99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand

99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | preppers | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests

Prepping isn’t all about wiling away your hours in a bunker, reloading ammo. It’s about the everyday things we do and the differences in our mindsets from non-preppers, and these are things that only real preppers will understand.

Preppers know these are actually signs of sanity, but we get used to being misunderstood by the unprepared and the mainstream media, who all seem to think that we’re crazy. Sometimes it’s fun to have a good laugh about their misconceptions of what we actually do.

You might be a prepper if these signs relate to you.

Many of the following signs will be so relatable that they’ll probably give you a warm glow. Feel the prepper solidarity!

  1. Pantries are so mainstream…you have food stashed in strange places in every room of the house.
  2. You have enough toilet paper to get through a year of uncomfortable digestive upsets…occurring with 6 people simultaneously
  3. Speaking of which, you possess at least 3 different ways to use the bathroom, only one of which is an actual bathroom.
  4. Your kids know what OPSEC means…at the age of 4.
  5. You have topographical maps of your area…plural.
  6. When you’re forced to interact with “the others” you feel like you are awkwardly censoring your true opinions
  7. You think nothing of treating an injury or illness yourself because “what if there was no doctor?
  8. Paintball and laser tag99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B006QHC8VU | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests  are no longer just a fun way to spend an afternoon  …they are tactical training.
  9. You’ve purchased duct tape in bulk.
  10. With every major purchase, you contemplate going for the off-grid version.
  11. You have more manual tools than power tools.
  12. You’ve washed entire loads of laundry by hand for either necessity or practice. (And not just your dainties…we’re talking about jeans and stuff!)
  13. Your kids are not afraid of guns…or fingers pointed like guns…or pastries in the shape of guns…or drawings of guns.
  14. When house-hunting you look for multiple heat and water sources.
  15. You store food in buckets…lots of buckets…like, maybe even a whole room full of buckets.
  16. You garden with a determination and time commitment normally reserved for endurance athletes training for an Ironman triathlon.
  17. If you don’t have a water source on your property, you have put in miles of footwork searching for one nearby, and have mapped multiple discreet routes to and from the source, and figured out how to haul the water back to your house on each route.
  18. Your first instinct when hearing about some event on the mainstream news is skepticism. (False flag event, anyone?)
  19. You read articles about multiple ways to use white vinegar and nod your head throughout.
  20. You believe that FEMA camps are real and that you are most likely on “The List”.
  21. Instead of CNN, you have alternative news sites bookmarked in your favorites on your computer.
  22. You have enough coffee/tea/favorite-caffeinated-item-of-choice to last you through 3 apocalypses.
  23. You could outfit a small-town pharmacy with all of the over-the-counter medications you have stashed away.
  24. You have an instinctive mistrust of anyone working for the government.
  25. You could sink a ship with the weight of your stored ammo. In fact, you put it in the basement when you became concerned about your floorboards.
  26. Looking for a fun weekend outing with the kids? Forget amusement parks –  the shooting range is where it’s at.
  27. When the power goes out, you calmly light the candles and proceed with whatever you had been dong previously.
  28. A longer-term power outage is called “practice”.
  29. If a like-minded person comes over to your house, they’ll realize you are “one of them” by seeing your reading material. Other folks won’t even notice. The FBI might call your copy of The Prepper’s Blueprint and your A. American fiction  “subversive literature”.
  30. Your children carry a modified bug-out kit in their school backpacks.
  31. You can and dehydrate food with the single-minded fervor of an Amish grandmother facing a 7-year drought.
  32. Calling 911 is not part of your home security plan.
  33. You spend your days off digging an underground bunker in your backyard.
  34. You have more than a thousand cheapo lighters that you purchased in bulk, stashed away in the back of your linen closet…and you don’t even smoke.
  35. You eat a lot of survival food now, so there is no ‘system shock’ when you are forced to eat only the items you have stocked (or that you GROW – hint hint).
  36. You stock alcohol in mass quantities so you can comfortably numb after the SHTF.
  37. You stock alcohol in mass quantities – and you don’t even drink. (Barter, baby!)
  38. You know what? Forget stocking alcohol.  You have your own still99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B00A943BFI | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests .  You’ll make alcohol.
  39. You have enough salt to create another Dead Sea.
  40. You don’t move – you strategically relocate.
  41. You purchased 50 of these little EDC multitaskers 99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B006E0QAFY | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests already for stocking stuffers for your friends/family/workmates/neighbor/random stranger.
  42. Speaking of Christmas, you gave Conflicted to everyone last year.
  43. When your friends ask about your favorite authors, instead of Hemmingway, Tolkien, or Kerouac, you get a blank stare when you tell them it’s John ‘Lofty’ Wiseman99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=ur2&o=1 | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests .
  44. You know exactly how many Mountain House buckets 99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B00955DUHQ | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests it takes to make a base for a single bed.
  45. You don’t stock up on milk. You get an actual cow.
  46. Your family doesn’t dare take something from the food stockpile without marking it off the list.
  47. Your kids know how to don a gas mask in 30 seconds.
  48. Everyone in your survival group carries the same firearm so that ammo is standardized.
  49. You have non-electric versions of appliances like wheat grinders99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B0038NPJVG | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests , washing machines99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B002C8HR9A | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests , and coffee makers99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B0000CFLCT | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests .
  50. You yell at the TV every time a commercial for Doomsday Preppers comes on.  Oh. Wait. You don’t have a TV. But if you did, you’d yell, because you know how positively ridiculous and unrealistic that show is.
  51. Your family is no longer surprised when you announce, “Hey, we’re going to learn how to make (insert anything here)!”
  52. You have more how-to books stored on hard-drives than most public libraries have on the bookshelves.
  53. Your children have a plan in case they need to bug out from school.
  54. Alternatively, you homeschool and bugging out is part of the curriculum.
  55. You have more than three ways to cook dinner if the power goes out: a woodstove, a barbecue, a sun oven99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B00C9OV8VK | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests , a fire-pit, and/or a volcano stove99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B000FDKXN6 | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests .
  56. First Blood99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B0004Z33EG | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests and Red Dawn 99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B005QG2DGC | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests are basic training films for your family.
  57. You have long since accepted the idea that if you’re not on someone’s list, you’re probably not doing it right.
  58. Your 7-year-old knows Morse code.
  59. You’re secretly disappointed when the electricity comes back on after only a few minutes.
  60. You know more ways to make a homemade knife than the entire population of your local prison combined.
  61. You don’t just rotate food, you rotate ammo.
  62. You know the distance from your door to your front gate is precisely 207 yards.
  63. Moving to a new house is no longer “moving”, but “strategic relocation99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=1568612621 | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests “.
  64. You have mapped out at least 3 different routes by car and 2 different routes on foot to get to your bug-out location.
  65. You know the difference between “Tyvek99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B00821J4JC | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests ” and “Tychem99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B005QQFHI8 | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests ” suits, and in which instance they should be used.
  66. Ditto the finer points of N-95 99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B0002YKBV2 | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests vs. N-10099 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B008MCV43K | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests masks.
  67. You watch The Walking Dead99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=ur2&o=1 | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests  in order to critique their survival tactics. (And you were secretly delighted to see Beth building a fire in a Dakota pit.)
  68. Speaking of fire, you can start one in at least 3 different ways, and you always carry a lighter, a fresnel lens99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B005MPREQ6 | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests , and a magnesium firestarter99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B0013L2DKU | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests .
  69. You have two (or more) of everything important, well, because “one is none.”
  70. You have a decoy food supply.
  71. Your kids think it’s a fun game to see who can find the most potential weapons in a room.
  72. Even your dog has a bug out bag99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B000HJJHXK | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests  – which she carries herself.
  73. You have elected NOT to purchase greater armament because you plan on upgrading with your future assailant’s weaponry.
  74. Your EDC includes a knife, firearm w/extra mag, flashlight, mylar blanket, Chapstick, and an ounce of silver — and that’s just for when you’re walking the dog.
  75. The trunk of your car has enough supplies to carry the family through an entire week during a major blizzard.
  76. One criterion for your new winter coat is that it fits over your body armor.
  77. Your neighbors separate their compost for you into a) chicken food b) garden food and c) other
  78. You scour travel size aisles because they fit better in bug-out bags and they make great barter items.
  79. You check out the garden center and pest control section for potential weapons.
  80. Your subscribed channels for YouTube and bookmarks now contain more prepper and alternative media sites than cute animal sites.
  81. Christmas and birthday gifts have a prepper theme.
  82. You actually know what the letters “EMP” stand for.
  83. Every time there is a small household “disaster” like a power outage or local water “boil order” you just grab your emergency supplies and remind dubious family members. “See, told you it pays to be prepared.”
  84. Your freeze-dried food has a longer expiration date than you do
  85. You know how to make bows out of skis and arrows out of garden bamboo.
  86. You have (or are seriously considering, buying) an old armored personnel carrier to turn into your RV.
  87. You know that Falling Skies has better idea for post-apocalyptic survival than The Walking Dead or Z Nation but you still watch them all just in case
  88. Your friend asks “Do you have enough bullets?” then you both laugh and laugh because you know you can never have enough.
  89. You changed your home page from MSN (or any other propaganda media) to Drudge Report or SHTFplan.
  90. You have no problem knocking on strangers’ doors to ask for fruit tree cuttings
  91. You have vacuum packed underwear in a plastic tub stashed somewhere in your house
  92. You just might have more medical supplies than the local ER.
  93. The Co-op and Costco recognize you but pretend not to. They know better than to ask questions about your purchases.
  94. If you’re a man you are no longer embarrassed to buy tampons and sanitary napkins because they make great bandages.
  95. If you’re a woman you know you don’t need to buy tampons or sanitary napkins because so many other options exist.
  96.  You actually own a toilet seat that fits on a bucket.
  97. You have enough wood cut and stacked to form a barricade around your whole property.
  98. Admit it. Every time the power goes out, you go see if your car starts so you can get the jump on hunkering down or buying out the store with case in the event that this one is actually an EMP.
  99. You have considered filtering water with a coffee filter or a t-shirt.

Do you have more prepper signs to add?

These signs that you might be one of those “crazy preppers” are consolidated from the hive mind of two previous articles and comments from the readers. (Find them here and here.) Do you have more signs to add?  Share them in the comments section below.


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The post 99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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Why Low-Tech Prepping Is a Better Option for a Long-Term Grid-Down Scenario

Why Low-Tech Prepping Is a Better Option for a Long-Term Grid-Down Scenario | Why-Low-Tech-Prepping-Is-a-Better-Option-for-a-Long-Term-Grid-Down-Scenario | Off-Grid & Independent Living PreparednessSurvival

With power outages crippling cities across the nation, the potential for a nasty solar flare, and geopolitical tensions, it might be time to revisit your long term power outage plan. This article from the archives explains why I won’t be investing in pricey generators or expensive equipment. Low-tech prepping is much more affordable and sustainable for those of us without extravagant budgets.

The Big Blackout: Why I’m Going Low-Tech to Prep for an EMP

This might be stating the obvious, but in the event of an EMP, things will not be the same, no matter how great your generator is.

Aaron Dykes of Truthstream Media wrote an excellent article about the extreme likelihood of a catastrophic event that could take out our power grid:

Billionaire hedge fund manager Paul Singer is warning investors – and more broadly, lawmakers and leaders – about the potential destructive power of an electromagnetic pulse, or EMP, which could be triggered by solar events or artificially, via blasts in the atmosphere.

According to Singer, research shows that no other incident, including a nuclear bomb, has the potential for such wide-scale devastation, coupled with the relative likelihood of occurring. While a nuke would primarily impact on the location of a such (such a city), an EMP could occur globally or across large-scale regions, wreaking havoc on the entire electric grid and devices…

…Government agencies, such as NASA and Homeland Security, have taken some preliminary steps towards preparing for an EMP attack – regardless of the potential for natural of man made causes – but the public at large remains cripplingly unaware of the dangers present to modern life, and its reliance on all things electronic, digital and, thus, transient. (Check out the rest of this MUST-READ article HERE)

We’ve all read many articles about the likelihood of grid failure. We’ve been warned again and again that it isn’t a matter of if, but when, it happens.

Because of this, a lot of people are preparing for a very different future.  Folks are getting ready for the Big Blackout.  The thing is, I am not sure everyone is thinking this through.  Many people are spending buckets of money on preparations to try to keep their lives as similar as possible to how they are today. They’re investing in diesel generators and Faraday cages to protect their electronics. They are buying propane-fueled appliances.  They’re stashing away fuel to run these gadgets.

Generators are not a practical investment for EMP preparation.

The problem with that method of preparation is, the fuel-generated lifestyle will only last for as long as you have…well…fuel.

Very few of us have enough storage space or the proper facilities to store 5 years’ worth of fuel.  If the power grid goes down in a catastrophic way, it’s going to take at least 5 years to get things up and running again, and that’s assuming things ever get up and running again in the way they are now.

That means that people are spending thousands of dollars investing in items that will only sustain their lifestyles for a brief period of time.  Generators are not a long term solution unless you have renewable power. (More on that later). While a generator would be a blessing in a short-term emergency (think a week-long power outage due to a storm), for a permanent way of life they are completely impractical.

Furthermore, in the event of an EMP strike, if your generator is not protected, it may not work no matter how much fuel you have stored.

Maybe the fact that I’m not rolling in money is the reason I feel this way. Maybe people with lots of money to spare have ideas about how to keep their generators running forever. But for my personal situation, this is a preparation strategy that is completely impractical.

A low-tech lifestyle is the best way to prep for grid-down survival.

If money is an object in your preparedness endeavors, (and let’s face it, money is an object for most of us these days), then focus your dollars on preps that are sustainable without electrical power.  Instead of trying to live the exact same life you are living right now, only fueled by an individual generator, look for low-tech solutions instead.  This reminds me of people who stop eating gluten but still want to eat exactly like they have been eating their entire lives, only now with expensive gluten-free baked goods that cost 4 times the price of their wheat-filled counterparts.  When things change dramatically, accept the change and adapt to it, instead of trying to maintain the illusion that everything is the same.

Whether you can get power from an outlet in the wall or not, the necessities of day-to-day life will remain the same:

  • Water
  • Shelter and Warmth
  • Food
  • Sanitation and Hygiene
  • Light

The ultimate preparedness goal should be to provide those necessities without any help from the power grid, generators, or fossil fuel. (LEARN MORE about planning for a long-term disaster)

When my youngest daughter and I lived in the North Woods of Canada, we lost power frequently throughout the year. Lots of folks in the area had generators that they would fire up when the power went out, and that was a viable solution, since gas stations were available and fuel was pretty much unlimited as long as you could afford to go get it.  We were on a tight budget, however, and we adapted our situation to live without power during those outages.  After the first couple of outages, we had worked out most of the bugs and we even began to look forward to our time without power – it was like a little vacation from the regular workday.  As plugged in as our society is, power is not actually a necessity – it’s a luxury, and we can live without it as long as we are adaptable, creative, willing, and prepared.

Let’s look at some specific examples of low-tech ways to take care of our necessities.  These ideas are just food for thought, based on my own preparedness plan – they may not be the solutions that will work best for you, but the goal here is to brainstorm your own situation and figure out how to live your life low-tech if the need occurs.

Off-grid Water

If you haven’t located water sources near your home,  it’s time to break out the topographical maps of your area and find them!  A low-tech water plan might include some or all of the following:

  • A manual pump for your well
  • Buckets and wheelbarrows for hauling water from a nearby source
  • Rain barrels for water harvesting (THIS is an inexpensive option with mixed reviews)
  • A gravity-fed water filtration system (we have THIS ONE)
  • A water dispenser for convenient access to filtered water (Be sure to get one with the bottle on top so that it can be operated without electricity, and not one that uses an electric pump to pull the water up from the bottom)
  • Storage units for water such as cisterns or tanks
  • Portable water filter bottles for safe water when you are away from home (we have THIS ONE)

Off-grid Shelter and Warmth

Homes these days aren’t built to function without a connection to the power grid.  If you aren’t fortunate enough to live in an older home that was designed for off-grid living, look at some ways to take your home back a century or so. A secondary heating system is vital in most climates.

  • An antique oil heater can use lots of different oils and requires little effort for installation (THIS SITE is loaded with information about Perfection oil heaters)
  • Have a woodstove installed
  • Clean your chimney and get your fireplace working
  • Set up an outdoor fireplace with large rocks to bring inside for radiant heat (this won’t get you super warm but it’s better than nothing)
  • Have a good supply of blankets, warm clothes, and cold-rated sleeping bags
  • Learn techniques to stay warm with less heat

Off-grid Food

Not only do you need access to food, but you also need a way to cook it and a way to keep your refrigerated and frozen items from spoiling.

Off-grid Sanitation and Hygiene

How will you keep clean and deal with human waste in the event of a long-term emergency?

Off-grid Lighting

The world is a scary place when it’s dark, and most of us have forgotten how dark TRUE dark really is, due to light pollution and the proximity of neighbors. Here are some lighting solutions for an off grid world:

  • Solar garden lights – store them outside to be charged during the day and bring them in and put them in vases where they’re needed at night
  • Oil lamps – you can recycle used cooking oil or use rendered fat to power these – they give a brighter light and can be used for reading and close-work (Learn more HERE)
  • Candles – stock them and learn to make them
  • Solar powered flashlights

Renewable power is practical power.

One exception to my no-generators rule is renewable power. If you can afford a solar set up for your home, then very little would change about your day-to-day life, aside from you being one of the few people with power.  You don’t have to go totally solar to have power for a few important items.  Assuming you have electronics in working order, they can be powered with solar, wind, or water.

Most of us can’t afford an entire set up but these are some options to consider:

  • Build a DIY portable solar recharging station – learn how to make it HERE
  • Solar-powered systems for specific items – learn more HERE
  • Use wind power – learn more HERE
  • Use water power – learn more HERE

What will you do when the electrical power goes out?

Do you have plans in place for a long-term (or permanent) power outage?  Are you planning to use generators and maintain your current lifestyle, or are you planning to go low-tech? Share your opinions and some of your cost-effective ideas in the comments!


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The post Why Low-Tech Prepping Is a Better Option for a Long-Term Grid-Down Scenario appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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Prepping In Real Life: It is Never Too Late to Change Course

Prepping In Real Life: It is Never Too Late to Change Course | escape-from-fishy-life-background-700x438 | PreparednessSurvival

There is no other way to begin this article than to simply begin.

Back in the day, meaning 2011 and 2012, survivalist preppers were a curiosity. Those of us that chose this journey ended up soldiering their way through a maze of trial and error, amassing supplies and traditional skills that would carry us through the next apocalypse.

Early on, I chose to refer to the next apocalypse as a “disruptive event” and the label stuck.  Whether a natural disaster, economic collapse, or manmade event, it was always my feeling that a broad foundation of self-sufficiency would carry us through the worst of times.

And so it has been for all these years.

Do you ever feel like a fish out of water? If so, you are not alone.

Unfortunately, so many years later, I find that prepping has become an industry filled with bad information, shoddy ethics, and fraud.  I am saddened by all of this, so much so that there are days I want to give it up lest I am caught up in a cycle where raw capitalism supersedes common sense education.

But I digress.

In this newest Backdoor Survival think piece, I would like to challenge you to take a look at yourself and your needs and judge yourself by your own standards and not those of someone else.  I ask you to walk the walk and stay true to your core belief system so that you can become as prepared as you need to be.  No more, and no less.

To help you along, I am including an excerpt from Dan Chiras’ book, Things I Learned Too Late In Life: It’s Never Too Late To Be Who You Might Have Been.  It has helped me a lot, and I hope it helps you, too.

It’s Never too Late to Be Who You Might Have Been

Most of us live two lives: a secret inner life decorated with high ideals and moral principles, and an outer real life in which we often abandon or compromise our morals and ideals, sometimes our most cherished ideals, for the sake of expediency, fitting in, getting by, or hundreds of other flimsy excuses.

In essence, each of us is a complex mixture of who we are and who we’d like to be. No wonder that we’re each a conflicting maze of emotions and ideas and actions.

At a keynote address at a conference at the University of Colorado in the 1990s, a prominent health-food advocate told her audience, “Don’t judge me by my cupboards.” She went on to explain that her children insisted on her buying all kinds of less-than-healthy goodies – cereals loaded with food dyes and, of course, dripping with sugar. All these products violated her beliefs – and teachings — about sound nutrition.

I fully understand and sympathize with her and don’t stand in judgment. All parents know how difficult it is to get our children to eat right. I offer this anecdote, however, as an example of one of many often powerful forces that steer us off the path of being – or becoming — who we really want to be – in this case, our children’s unrelenting and plaintive whining.

This speaker’s proclamation was just one example of how we all live lives nagged by many niggling little white lies – believing in one thing, acting in ways that contradict our beliefs.

Bottom line, however, when all is said and done, we have to judge ourselves by what’s in our cupboards, not by the slogans on the bumper stickers on our cars or the T shirts we wear on weekends.

What we do is who we are. We are not what we believe in but fail to do or be.

The Final Word

When it comes to prepping, talk is cheap. It is the doing that is expensive.  As I learned from Dan’s book, “walking your talk” takes time, energy, money, and commitment.

My wish for all of you is that you continue to walk your talk. Do it your way.  And when in doubt, ask a lot of questions.  If something smells wrong, most likely it is wrong. Go with your gut instincts, instead.

Prepping, and being a survivalist prepper, is hard work so define your needs, and go from there.  Be true to yourself and your moral compass and you can not and will not go astray.

And that, as I like to say, is all I am going to say about that.

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!


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The post Prepping In Real Life: It is Never Too Late to Change Course appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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How to Survive World War 3: Prepping for an Off-Shore Conflict

How to Survive World War 3: Prepping for an Off-Shore Conflict | How-to-survive-an-off-shore-conflict | PreparednessSurvival Sleuth Journal Special Interests War Propaganda

If an all-out war erupts, it will be like nothing the Earth has seen before. All of our “progress” means that each side now has the weapons at their disposal to destroy their enemy many times over. Because of this, we can’t as readily look back in history to learn how to survive World War 3.

Most of the time, when I write an article, it’s based on research or personal experience. I can find times when the incident has occurred in the past and study them. I can learn what catastrophes came hand-in-hand, and analyze what we need to know ahead of time to survive. The potential of a conflict like WWIII is quite different because, during the last World War, our technology was a drop in the bucket compared to what is now available. The situation we have now is called MAD – Mutually Assured Destruction – and the acronym couldn’t be any more accurate because it’s utter madness to destroy our world.

I have to be honest. This is based on speculation because we just don’t know how it would play out. It’s based on the most likely consequences, on what I know of our economy, on how wars have played out for ordinary citizens in the past, and on what I know of general preparedness. Earlier this week, I posted a compilation of reader’s comments about what we could face if we went to war. You can read that article here.

If there are developments, I’ll send out alerts via email, so make sure  you’re signed up to the newsletter.)

What this article is not about

There are some topics I won’t be covering in this article.

Current events: This won’t cover the current bombings, sabre-rattling, and incidents. I recommend the following sources for that coverage:

The dubious morality of war: A lot of folks seem to be thrilled at the concept of war. They don’t seem to comprehend that whatever our military does to another country, someone else could come along and do to us. The stuff I saw on social media reminded me of that naive scene in Gone with the Wind, when Civil War was declared and all the young men at the barbecue were whooping with excitement, having no idea of the horrors and brutality that would soon occur.

The United States is not untouchable, and I won’t even discuss the dubious morality of war. All I’ll say to those folks who are cheering from the sidelines and treating it like a football game, “You have no idea what you’re asking for.”

Nuclear war: Although a nuclear strike is a possibility, that isn’t a topic that will be covered in this article. That horrible prospect requires far more than I can provide in the scope of a single article. (Here’s some basic information on surviving a nuclear strike and you can look for a very thorough upcoming crash course on the topic at Preppers University – sign up here to get on the email list so you’ll be alerted when it is available.)

Attacks on American soil: This article is pretty long already and that topic deserves its own article – look for it next week.

Rainbows and Unicorns: And finally, before we get started, a quick note to all of the people who scorn articles like this as “fear-mongering:

Is it less frightening to face a situation with no knowledge of how it might play out? Is it preferable to be blithely unaware of what might befall us? Would you rather it all be a horrible shock for which you are completely unprepared? If that’s your philosophy, stop reading now. I’d hate to ruin the surprise for you. Go ahead and believe in unicorns and rainbows.

For the rest of us, who want to give our families the best possible odds, read on.

Prepping to Survive World War 3

In a non-nuclear conflict, there are two possible scenarios: fighting in distant lands and conflict on our soil. Many of the preparations are the same, so we’ll start with involvement from a distance.

Economic Ramifications

While some people will become mind-blowingly wealthy due to war, it won’t be ordinary folks like us. If previous World Wars are a good indicator, we’ll be asked to make sacrifices to “support” our soldiers.Think about all of the WW2 propaganda posters that encourage people to raise their own food, to go without certain items, and to whole-heartedly embrace rations. I can assure you that people who own stock in defense companies won’t be dining on pigeon and squirrel, but I can’t say the same for the rest of us.

Whether you wish to live frugally or not, it will be forced upon all but the most well-to-do.  This is in part due to shortages (which we’ll discuss below) that will drive up the cost of consumer products. The price of transportation will also increase due to inflated gasoline prices, and this will affect the cost of every single good that has to be transported across any distance.

It’s likely that jobs will be available, due to increased enlistment in the military. (This could be due to a draft or simply voluntary sign-ups.) However, the money you make will have to go much further to combat the price increases.

Here are some immediate steps you can take to help counteract these potential economic ramifications. And if nothing bad happens, this won’t go the way of the Y2K preps. All of these are logical and reasonable steps for anyone to take to protect themselves from a financial downturn.

Stock up NOW. There’s no time to waste, given current global tensions. You need to have as much food quietly stashed away as possible. Remember that hungry friends and neighbors can be a threat later if you have food and they don’t, so keep your preps on the down-low.

Enact your self-reliance strategies NOW.  If you’ve been idly pondering the idea of a garden or a few chickens, put those plans into action. Raising food isn’t as easy as throwing some seeds in the dirt or erecting a chicken coop and tossing the birds a handful of grain now and then. Thinking that a survival homestead is something you can do later, on the spur of the moment is a terrible – and potentially deadly – mistake.

Keep cash on hand. In a crisis, banks often close and if this happens you won’t be able to access your money. Another possibility is that a cyber attack could cripple the financial system. Keep at least enough cash for a month’s worth of expenses. Have the cash in small denominations so that you won’t have to try and get change during an emergency.

Invest in precious metals. For many of us, the best investment is tangible goods like food, tools, and homesteading supplies. However, if you are in a situation in which you have wealth to guard, the best way to do this is with precious metals. Gold and silver will hold their value even if the dollar goes under.

Learn to live frugally. Living beneath your means will help you survive potential economic woes.

Focus on general preparedness. Aside from the specifics mentioned above, do everything you can to become more prepared in a general way. This will help you take any difficulties in stride.

Shortages That We Could Expect

Another issue that comes hand in hand with war is shortages. We live in a country that runs on imports. The US has a trade deficit of over $500 billion. (source) This means that we import far more than we export, which could be a massive issue in the event of a war. This could happen in a few different ways:

  • Another country could halt our supply routes
  • Other countries could refuse to do business with us
  • Prices could rise dramatically due to the conflict from increased transportation costs, worries about safety risks during transport, or by the countries from which we import suffering their own shortages.

When President Trump was inaugurated and said that he was going to tax imports, many articles were written about how an import tax could affect our cost of living. The same information is applicable if you look at it through the scope of war. Although the imports wouldn’t necessarily be taxed, we’d be looking at similar shortages. (This article on Consumer Reports gives an excellent overview on what could be affected due to an import tax.)

Here are some of the shortages we could anticipate and supporting links to help you prep for them:

Gasoline: A fuel shortage will, quite literally, affect everything. It will increase the cost of goods because getting them from one side of the country to the other will be more expensive. It will cause shortages because importing the goods into the country from elsewhere will be more difficult and costly. The ability to travel or commute will be affected for many people, causing it to be more difficult to get to work or school. Our worlds will get much smaller in such a situation.

This could happen in a few different ways. First, our fuel could be diverted to the war effort, or secondly, since a quarter of our petroleum comes from other countries (source), a shortage could evolve the same way as shortages of consumer goods, as addressed above.

Food: For all of the reasons mentioned above, we could be facing food shortages. America imports $130 billion per year worth of food, and we have all become accustomed to blueberries in December and bananas on demand. In 2011, statistics showed that 20% of our food is imported with particular emphasis on seafood (70%) and produce (35%).  With droughts and weather concerns plaguing agricultural hubs of the country over the past few years, this percentage has surely risen, although I was unable to find specific recent statistics.

Prescription medications: We are also a nation that is heavily reliant on prescription medications, many of which are made offshore. A whopping 80% of our prescription drugs are imported, according to the FDA website. In the event of a war that halts imports, the almost 70% of Americans who regularly rely on prescription drugs will be in big trouble.

Shortages of prescription medications could result in increased use of medical facilities due to uncontrolled heart conditions, diabetes, or other chronic ailments. This could cause reduced access to physicians, fewer available beds in hospitals, and higher prices for drugs that are available.

  • Sign up here to get a special report on Venezuela that discusses the medical crisis there that erupted due to pharmaceutical shortages. (It also lists the other things that they ran out of first during their own economic crisis.)
  • Look for options other than pharmaceutical for a backup plan. This book is loaded with natural remedies in the event that meds are no longer available.
  • Do your best to reduce your reliance on prescription medications if you can at all. Some health conditions can be managed with good nutrition. If you have an underlying issue that can be taken care of, do so now.

Power: In previous conflicts, power has been rationed in some parts of the world. This could be anything from predictable rolling blackouts to cutting power entirely in order to “support the war effort.”

Of course, during WW2, people were less reliant on electronics for every facet of their lives. Now, we are all completely hooked into the grid. Most folks rely on it for everything: information,  warmth, communication, money, and food storage. If that grid was no longer reliable, everything would change and some people would have a lot of difficulty adapting.

If your budget is tight, I strongly recommend against investing in a generator. First of all, they’re expensive and that money can be spent elsewhere. Unless it is solar, you’ll have to have fuel to run it. And it’s a pretty safe bet that if electricity is rationed, fuel will be outrageously expensive and difficult to acquire.

What if the conflict hits American soil?

The last time there was war on the American mainland was during the American Civil War. The next article in this series will discuss ways to prepare for the potential of conflict if it comes to us. Be sure to sign up for the newsletter so you don’t miss it.

Part 1: Is World War 3 Coming? 18 Preppers Discuss Effects, Shortages, and How to Get Ready

Part 2: How to Survive World War 3: Prepping for an Off-Shore Conflict

Part 3: How to Survive World War 3: Prepping in Case the Fight Comes to Us (coming soon)


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The post How to Survive World War 3: Prepping for an Off-Shore Conflict appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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Secret Sniper Technique Revealed: Ballistic Loophole Shooting (VIDEO)

Secret Sniper Technique Revealed: Ballistic Loophole Shooting (VIDEO) | brandon-precision | Multimedia PreparednessSurvival Special Interests

First, I brought you a practical method for easily building a ghillie suit which defeats thermal imaging (FLIR).  Now, I’ve decided to create an entire YouTube channel dedicated to equipping the citizenry with advanced means of self defense.

Guerrilla Think Tank is a project created by Brandon Smith of Alt-Market.com focused specifically on training, tactics and outside the box thinking.  We will study alternative means by which the general liberty-loving public can counter an advanced aggressor with the sometimes meager means at their disposal.  We will also study the psychology behind propaganda and how to recognize it, as well as study geopolitical events around the world and the perhaps unseen influences they can have on the future.   In short, Guerilla Think Tank is about asymmetric thinking and dismantling seemingly insurmountable threats with simple but unique solutions.

My first video teaches the long “secret” method of shooting at any distance through a ballistic loophole; effectively making the shooter invisible to observation.  Be sure to give the video a thumbs-up and subscribe to Guerrilla Think Tank if you liked it:

If you want Alt-Market to produce more videos like this one, consider sending a donation for our Guerrilla Think Tank fund.  There is a lot more training info on the way that you probably won’t find anywhere else!  Visit our donations page here: http://www.alt-market.com/donate

This article was republished from Alt-Market.com.


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Source: Alternative news journal

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Why Preppers Should Spend More Time Learning (and Less Time Shopping)

Why Preppers Should Spend More Time Learning (and Less Time Shopping) | Why-preppers-should-spend-more-time-learning | PreparednessSurvival
Hey – you, with the shovel.  Stop building that bunker. I want to ask you a question. Also, you – the folks with the shopping cart full of shelf-stable food. Hold on a minute.
How much time do you spend learning?
And by learning, I don’t mean some required on-the-job training or skimming over an article here and there. I mean a time that you set aside on a regular basis, whether it is weekly or daily, to focus all of your attention on something you need to learn.
Many people, once they get out of school, don’t spend a lot of time in study. As far as actual, scheduled study time, it’s gone along with their childhoods once they get their degree or diploma. But recently, when I asked the community what you felt you should focus on to further your preparedness efforts, a huge portion of you said, “Skills and Information.”
Becoming adept or knowledgeable is not going to magically happen without some concentrated effort and some resources. Just owning some books on a topic isn’t enough. You have to delve into it deeply and try it out if you want to be able to depend on that skill or knowledge during a difficult situation.
And best of all, it can never be taken away from you. No government officials doing so “for the greater good.” No jerk whose entire survival plan revolves around taking what you stored. No natural disaster that destroys your homes, your preps, and all your worldly possessions. In a long-term scenario or exteme situation, the only way to be truly prepared is to be able to independently provide for your own needs, without relying on the government, the stores, or the supply chain.
Once you’ve learned something – really learned it and put it into practice – it’s yours forever.
If you’re on a budget, you’re in luck. It often costs very little to obtain the knowledge. Between books, local classes, and online courses, you can get a ton of information and practical steps to take for a very nominal fee. And, sometimes, it’s even free. Of course you need supplies, but stop shopping for a little while and focus on increasing your knowledge. Bonus: Your future purchases will be made with more discretion due to your new information.
But it won’t happen without some determination and some time blocked off specifically for that purpose. You have to learn like your life depends on it.
Because, one day, it could.
First, I’ll provide some of my favorite resources and then I’ll tell you my secrets for making learning a priority.

Build your library

Most of the time, people in the preparedness world like to have hard copies of important information. This way, if the power goes out and you can’t access the internet or recharge your Kindle, you still have access to vital advice.

Some of these books are for just such an event, while others are guides to building your self-reliance skills.  Commit to picking up a good book each pay period until you have a library to reference during any type of scenario. But don’t just buy it and stick it on a shelf. Read that book and put some of the ideas into action. You may not have time to sit down and read 200 pages in the midst of a crisis, right?

My own books are indicated with a star. *

Be sure to check out used bookstores, libraries, and garage sales, too. Look for books that teach self-reliant skills like sewing, gardening, animal husbandry, carpentry, repair manuals, scratch cooking, and plant identification. You can often pick these up for pennies, and older books don’t rely on expensive new technology or tools for doing these tasks.

Bookmark some websites

The internet is a wonderful place, and best of all, a lot of this knowledge can be found for FREE! The more you know about crisis situations, the more ready you will be to face them.

Some sites are friendlier to beginners than others, so if you stumble upon a forum where people seem less than enthusiastic about helping people who are just starting out, don’t let it get you down. Move on and find a site that makes you feel comfortable.  If you see them utter the words, “If you aren’t already prepared, it’s too late,” run, don’t walk, away from them. No one needs that kind of doom and gloom. It’s stressful, unhelpful, and honestly, kind of mean. Plus, I firmly believe it’s never too late as long as you just get started.

To get the most out of a website, I strongly recommend subscribing to the newsletter. For example, I provide information to subscribers that isn’t available on my website, plus I share a lot of personal stories about how preparedness and frugality have helped our family live a comfortable and secure lifestyle. As well, when I find a really cool offer or discount, I can let you know about it ASAP. (You can subscribe to it here and get a free bundle of PDFs of the information readers have found to be the most helpful and inspiring over the years.)

Following are some of my favorite sites, and the link will take you to a good starting point on these sites. In no particular order:

Bookmark these, subscribe to the newsletters, and learn for free!

7 Ways I Make Learning a Priority

You may notice that there are a couple of days per week on which I don’t usually post articles or send newsletters. That’s because, on at least one of them, I learn. I set aside the entire span of my workday for it, too. I don’t mess around. Here’s what my study schedule looks like:
  1. I block off time for it. I have “work hours” even though I’m self-employed because I find it makes me more productive. I get up early, feed animals, grab some coffee, and get to work on the things that require the most concentration. Then, by the time my daughter is up and over her morning muteness, I’m finished with the things that require my undivided attention. I treat Learning Day exactly the same as any other work day.
  2. I catch up on newsletters.  I don’t usually take the time to read newsletters the day they come (there are a couple that are so good I have to, but mostly, I save them in a file on my email. Then, I sit down with my coffee and read them all.
  3. I keep a link document. As you can imagine, with the amount of research I do, I read many articles per week. However, there are dozens more I want to read but just don’t have time at the moment. Instead of losing them to the vagaries of the internet, I have a document to which I paste links all week long so that when I have time, I can sit down and read the articles. Once I’ve read them, I delete them from my list.
  4. I take online courses. Man, I love the internet. I can learn about things that would have cost thousands of dollars and time in a classroom before. Almost everything I learned about homesteading or running an easy-to-use website originated from an online course. On my designated learning day, I catch up with any webinars or assignments.
  5. I listen to podcasts or videos. If the information is presented in a format that I can listen to, I generally do that while I’m doing laundry or working in the kitchen. Those links go into my link document too.
  6. I take notes.  I keep two learning journals. One is for preparedness/homesteading information and the other is for website and business-related stuff. I take notes of the things that inspire me or seem the most applicable to my situation.
  7. I implement what I’ve learned. At the end of my learning session, I make a plan to implement the things I’ve learned. Maybe I add a button to my website that makes it easy for folks to print off the information. Perhaps I figured out a good way to plant a certain vegetable, so I order the seeds. You get the idea.
Now, you may not have an entire day to spare but I’ll bet you could take a few hours away from other activities, right? Having the information at hand can help, but often, in a crisis, seconds count and you won’t want to waste that time looking things up in a book.

Finally, you have to actually do stuff.

You can read and listen to podcasts until the cows come home, but until you actually put what you’ve learned into practice, it will be of as much use to you as the difference between an isosceles triangle and a scalene one – something you learned but never applied.
  • Take a prepping course and actually follow the to-do lists and do the challenges – there is a section each week of low-cost tasks and the challenges don’t cost a penny.
  • Take the master gardening class, make a plan, and produce the best garden ever.
  • Go take that First Aid course and brush up on your skills regularly.
  • Learn 5 ways to light a fire without matches and actually practice until it becomes easy.
  • Involve the family – you can make this fun!

Become a prepared, skillful person takes time. If you’re really serious about it, you’re going to have to commit to more than just stashing away some buckets.

Make learning a priority. It’s the least expensive but most important prep you’ll ever make.


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Source: Alternative news journal

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Is World War 3 Coming? 18 Preppers Discuss Effects, Shortages and How to Get Ready

Is World War 3 Coming? 18 Preppers Discuss Effects, Shortages and How to Get Ready | 18-Preppers-Discuss-Effects-Shortages-and-How-to-Get-Ready-750x500 | PreparednessSurvival Special Interests US News

Last week was tense as far as international relations go. We’re standing in a big puddle of gasoline and hoping that no one decides to light a cigarette because if they do, we’ll all go up in flames. For some background, here’s the information I gathered on the conflict between the US and Syria, along with the ties to Russia.

When there are missiles involved and talk of sending over ground troops, it isn’t a stretch of the imagination to believe that the current proxy war between the United States and Russia could turn into the real deal: World War III.

How would you even begin to prep for this?

If the conflict never reached American soil, there would still be dramatic changes in the way we live right now. Not only would the threat of violence be hanging over our heads – when will an attack happen and will my area be targeted? – but there would be serious economic and supply ramifications.

Preparing for this could be a book in and of itself, so I’m breaking this into two parts.

In the first installment, I’ll share some insights garnered from the readers. Next time around, we’ll discuss the preparations you need to begin making right away.

I had a chat with readers to discuss what they foresaw as the most likely concerns should these tensions escalate into a full-blown world war. Some of the comments are from people who recall living through a war, while others are educated suppositions from people with military backgrounds. Still others are stories passed down from parents and grandparents.

I asked these questions:

  • If World War 3 were to break out, how do you believe it would affect the average American?
  • What challenges do you think we would face here at home?
  • What shortages do you predict would occur?
  • How would you prep for this?

One principle that everyone seems to agree on is that we’ll be living very differently from our current luxurious, everything-on-demand lifestyles. It will be a dramatic change for many people, especially those who have never produced anything physical, like food, clothing, or other items. The government won’t be in a position to help those who can’t help themselves, and this could hit younger people particularly hard.

In summary, these were the most common suggestions.

Where appropriate, I’ve included links that will take you to information to help you learn the skills. I’ve also included a few of my own resources.

But for the real dish, read on.

Here’s what the readers had to say.

1.  Mimi

It would definitely affect Americans, average or not, because as a Nation we WOULD be involved. We may see higher prices on all goods , expecially oil, whether as a direct result of war or producers/retailers taking advantage for a higher profit.

We’d probably see rationing if it was prolonged, certainly an elevated Threat Level here at home, perhaps more ‘lone wolf’ attacks, more protests, and definitely more fear, which would be the most difficult for most people (sadly).

2. Helene

Considering that large swaths of the population don’t see themselves as part of this culture and that those same people have never delayed any gratification. I see riots and looting the minute after they’ve been told that their new “must have” kicks won’t be able to be imported due to fuel shortages and trade embargoes.

Buy. More. Ammo.

3. Elizabeth

Read Alas,Babylon by Pat Frank. [Note from Daisy: You can get that book here and I highly recommend it.] WWIII could be a whole different ball game.

Since we import everything, I see huge shortages, or extreme high prices. Prepping for this, I would stick up on DIY books and knowledge, heirloom seeds, and clothes. If it gets really bad the government can take your food, but not your knowledge.

 4. Mark

My Uncle served in WWll and Korea and Dad served during Korea and I served during Vietnam. Our families went through the great depression and passed down to children lessons learned.

My family is ready. We have home canned goods, stored fuels, Private well with stock pond and creek, generator numerous freezers of food that I can, if need be, home can most everything in there that would be necessary to save and enough self-defense equipment. I garden and home can every year as well as hunting and fishing with meat canned as well.

5. Sue

America has always been lucky. The land is isolated from Asia and Europe, and our neighbors have been friendly. WW3 will probably see impact on our shores and it won’t be good.

Interuptions of food, gasoline, and perscription drugs will happen first. Panic in the cities no doubt. That 3 days of food will be history, probably in less than 2. People will die in hospitals and elder care facilities due to shortages and lack of doctors and nurses since they will be taking care of their own families. Firefighters and paramedics will stay home too once they realize thia is long term. Local governments may step into the vacuum each to their own talents and faults. Not a pretty picture.

Prepping should be food, water, fuel, drugs, seeds, gardening tools, preservation of food ability, clothing for all seasons (remember kids grow), shoes, nails and screws to fix stuff, tarps, duck tape, etc.

6. Don

~If World War 3 were to break out, how do you believe it would affect the average American?

I think the media would try to console us and convince us that things were not as bad as they seem…and food riots, power inturruptions and mini pandemics were localized and rare…but the truth of the matter is…we live in a “supply side” economy and when gas starts being rationed and the trucks stop…America stops. The propaganda machine will swear to us that we are winning the war and that the sacrifices are worth the victory…but we will eventually learn that no one benefits from prolonged warfare.

~What challenges do you think we would face here at home?

Massive shortages, an increase in crime, an economic recession as the government prints more and more money to pay for the war. Rationing and a new “black market” emerges.

~What shortages would occur?

The essay “when the trucks stop America stops” [Note from Daisy – find that essay here]  said that EVERYTHING will disappear from shelves within 2 weeks. This will occur because gasoline will be rationed and interstate travel will become limited due to xenophobia. Hospitals will run out of medicine and wont be able to treat the sick. Stores wont stock food.

Thats when the theft kicks in…and thats when martial law will be used in most urban areas. Troops will search every home and confiscate whatever they feel will make their job easier and make you less of a threat. And of course…this will make the shortages even more severe.

~How would you prep for this?

The key really is “skills”. Not just survival/bushcraft skills but manufacturing and bartering skills as well. If you know how to make soap, distill alcohol, purify water, trap small game for meat, know how to grow vegetables…you can manufacture goods you can barter for other goods and even services.

Thats what I have done. I’ve developed skills that I can use to create things of value that I will use to trade for what I do not have.

7. Susan

We got a glimpse of reactions after Hurrican Katrina. The entitlement crowd felt entitled to steal and riot since they weren’t getting their freebies.

Will they suddenly get patriotic and sacrifice for the good of the country? Highly unlikely.

8. Ken

If World War 3 were to break out, how do you believe it would affect the average American?

This question depends on where to break out is. Generally speaking, I believe a large section of the populace will panic. They are just not prepared, mentally, emotionally, spiritually, physically, financially or have the necessary skills to actually provide for themselves or their families.

People would be so stunned by the depth of cuts needed to provide the necessary material to fight a World War that government (local and national) would have to step in on an even more intrusive level. Many ‘average Americans” would starve, die of diseases, or just succumb to the circumstances as they are not prepared for something of this magnitude. We have forgotten the lessons of the past.

What challenges do you think we would face here at home?

1. Economy
2. Access to Medical services
3. “Things” breaking down and no idea how to fix or manage without them
– Computers, banking, cars, etc.…
4. Security
5. Safety
6. Fear

What shortages would occur?

Fuel, Power, Food staples (sugar, butter, meats), Medications, Metal, Labor (farm, “menial”), Textiles, Precious Metals. This list is far from complete, but highlights those things that come immediately to mind.

Don’t forget that the things needed to produce them would also be in limited supply, so to would be the individuals that know how to make things.

We have become a nation that insists on attending Colleges and Universities instead of trade schools, we are losing the ability to “make” things and keep them up and running.

How would you prep for this?

1. LEARN how to do many different things. Doesn’t mean I have to master them, just means I have to make things work for my needs.
2. GROW the items that will allow me to survive and hopefully thrive.
3. STOCK UP on the items I can’t grow or procure.
– Meats, arms, spare parts, tools, toiletries, medications
– Precious metals
– Communications capability 4. REUSE, REFURBISH everything
5. NOW put items up that have “proven” long shelf life.
– Canning, smoking, curing the items I need and like.
6. CONTACTS are needed because no one person can do everything
7. CURRENTLY try to live that lifestyle, as anything over and above is a gift and should be treated so
8. MENTALLY prepare to do what is necessary to ensure my families welfare and safety
9. PRACTICE, PRACTICE and PRACTICE some more
10. FAITH we will all need this to get through
11. GUTS, trust your guts before your heart when dealing with mankind in all things
– People WILL screw you and attempt to take what you have work hard for
12. TRUST the ones you have chosen to be in your life

9. Terri

How it would affect the “average American” is easy. Since most have lost touch with the ability to grow their own food, much less preserve it (heck many don’t when know how to cook). That with the possible reduction in imported goods, the average American may end up in the fetal position until the war ends. Mexico is threatening to not send us their goods in protest over our immigration policies (a move that will probably hurt them more than us, frankly).

For awhile, fuel shouldn’t be an issue because we still aren’t exporting it. There will be a spike in costs across the board. My advice, get your butt in the dirt! Learn to garden, preserve, cook, fix your own stuff rather than replacing at every turn.

10. Betty

When I lived in Israel the govt. told us to have a 3 week supply of water and food. We still have our “war closet” here in the U.S.. I am aiming at 3 month supply. We had to use our supplies there more because of job losses. Once when there was a terror attack the govt shut down ATMs so we learned to keep some cash on hand. Water and a way to cook long term are my biggest concerns living in an apartment.

11. Debbie

If the bombs and destruction were not happening here on the homeland, there would be no affect. Many ppl would not even be aware that we were at war.

If, however, there were bombs and destruction on the homeland (God forbid), there would be total chaos and panic. There would be total breakdown of law and order in the urban areas, especially after a given city had sustained an attack.

Best place to be would be out in the country. First sign of WWIII, get out of Dodge (problem is, though, it will go down in hours, not days).

12. Frank

My parents grew up during the depression and my father was in England during WW2. Backyard gardens, chickens and rabbits were a regular thing for them. Today they are gone but not forgotten. Prepping is just routine for me. Anyone thinking that the Gov’t will be there to help you will surely not survive. We all have lives to live so I don’t obsess over everything but I do something every day to stay prepared.

13. Dana

Skills, skills, skills. Being able to grow, can, hunt, butcher,etc are key in my mind. Stockpiling is important to keep yourself well and comfortable to stay at home.

Here is my thought in medications, put back all you can but get to know an herbalist or naturopathic doc. Long term, meds can and will run out.

 14. John

I don’t think very many people understand what truly hard times entail to thrive or just survive.

Start talking to people 70 and up and you’ll realize like I did that most info is flawed from the start and what preppers consider hard times they never saw it that good. No offense, I had to readjust my thinking too.

Like how they wouldn’t think twice about eating meat we would consider spoiled twice over. That’s why they damn near burned all the meat they ate. Burnt won’t make you sick but med- rare will with no refrigerator.

15. Nancy

My dad served in three wars. He served WWII, army air corp before it was USAF, before me. He and his three brothers all served during the WW, each in a different branch and all overseas. I cannot imagine how my grandmother, a widow with four girls at home, dealt with it. He served Korea, before my memory lol. He served Viet Nam and I was in high school.

I remember my parents and grandparents talking about being prepared with necessities, always having a victory garden, and the strict list of staples they had to adhere to in WWII. Those times compared in no way to the Viet Nam era. I do not recall mom and me doing without anything we needed or wanted while he was gone then, other than him.

He is buried in Arlington cemetery. I remember waking every morning to him raising the flag outside our house and then turning to salute it, and then reversing the patriotic gesture before dusk. He did this until his eighties. He was diagnosed with prostate cancer in his late seventies. The VA confirmed it was from agent orange used in Viet Nam. He gave all he could for our country and us, and in the end, he gave it all for our freedom. Thanks for asking about my dad, the biggest American patriot I will ever know.

16. Donna

My parents were born just before the Depression – I know how to start a fire, milk a cow, kill a chicken. My baby sister on the other hand, has NO idea what you have to do to live without electricity, I fear that most people would literally freeze or starve to death just from ignorance. Is World War 3 Coming? 18 Preppers Discuss Effects, Shortages and How to Get Ready | 1f641 | PreparednessSurvival Special Interests US News

17. Pragmatic

World War 3? If that happens you better be mega prepared and even then it doesn’t matter. The way I see it, so many people are on prescription drugs for one thing or another. Disease is going to kill more than anything else. Do people really know how to deal with medical emergencies when there’s no hospitals, doctors, medicines at the snap of a finger?

People are going to die and die fast without modern medicine. Propery body disposal .. are you ready to deal with this? The physical, emotional toll this will have on many will be major. Many will not be able to deal and will off themselves.

All the prepping in the world will not do you any good, if you do not have skills and the emotional & psychological mindset to deal with some pretty ugly and disturbing things in a World War, especially in this day and age. I see way to many prepping pages and survival pages with great information, but not reasonable or feasable. Just food for thought.

18. Keith

Everything could and probably will happen. Knowing how to survive, literally, is all that might matter. Hopefully, we’ll still be able to gather together in our local communities and help each other. Having something to barter, is always good.

I decided, when I was 15, I’d learn all I could about everything I came across that helped me to be selfsufficient. After 42 years, I’ve learned a lot, but still don’t know everything. Knowing how to build a house, and fix everything in it, grow your food, hunt, fish and protect yourself is a good start.

We all need to have something to offer or ‘bring to the table’. The Platinum card has expired, I’m afraid.

Thank you!

Thank you to everyone who shared their thoughts. It was difficult to choose which suggestions to include – this article is more than 3000 words, so I wasn’t able to include all of the comments. To read more, find the threads HERE and HERE.

Now, it’s your turn.

I’ll ask you the same questions.

  • If World War 3 were to break out, how do you believe it would affect the average American?
  • What challenges do you think we would face here at home?
  • What shortages do you predict would occur?
  • How would you prep for this?

If you were around during one of the major wars, what do you remember from it? What stories did your family members tell? Do you have experience-based advice for people who have never seen a situation like this?

Please share your stories in the comments section. We all look forward to reading them.

And be on the lookout for part 2, coming later this week. Part 2 will be a practical guide.


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The post Is World War 3 Coming? 18 Preppers Discuss Effects, Shortages and How to Get Ready appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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Get 11 Steps to Living a Strategic Life for Free

Get 11 Steps to Living a Strategic Life for Free | life-options | Off-Grid & Independent Living PreparednessSurvival Special Interests

Things tend to move fast and furious at times and at this moment, such is the case in Backdoor Survival Land. So what is happening?  I am in the process of getting settled at my mountain retreat in Payson, Arizona.  When a prepper moves, it is hectic!

That being said, a couple of days ago I took a break to be interviewed by Todd Sepulveda, the editor of Pepper Website.  He has a new website, The Prepper Website Podcast, and today he is featuring an interview with both me and my BFF, George Ure, who runs the Urban Survival website.

Free eBook:  11 Steps to Living a Strategic Life

We are both honored and thrilled and to celebrate, a copy of our eBook, 11 Steps to Living a Strategic Life: A Guide to Survival During Uncertain Times will be available on Amazon for free between April 5 and April 9.

What is this book about?  Strategic Living, of course.

Here is a section from the interview. (Click here to hear the whole thing.)

Question: Could you paste in a paragraph from your book that gives a good feel for what readers will experience?

Answer Gaye:

“Living strategically – by our own definition – means living a life full of abundant adventure while embracing the tenets of simplicity and sustainability. It means being healthy and reaping the benefits of bounteous friendships and caring relationships.

It means living a life full of happiness and readiness, without the burden of wanting to be someone else or someplace else. It means liking yourself and moving forward with this business of life with animated spirit and optimism.

This all sounds like lofty stuff but when you get right down to it, we think we have been preparing for this moment for a long long time. Living strategically means being self-sufficient and being self-reliant. It means being prepared for life in these uncertain times.”

Answer George:

“The only real “business equation” you need ever learn is that if you spend less than you make, you will always be well off. It seems almost childish to say this, but if you can pay cash for anything it is a good idea to do so. There are plenty of reasons why:

1. If you pay cash, your ownership in generally unencumbered. This means that you own something outright and no one can take it away from you without breaking the law. One exception here is that the government can seize property for nonpayment of taxes.

2. If you pay cash, you don’t pay interest charges. Even though real estate loans are at record low levels of interest, there are still credit card outfits which gouge people for 21% and higher at a time when they are borrowing at the Fed discount window for less than 1%. Oh, sure, they whine about nonpayment’s, charge-off rates and other items, but in the end they’re gouging. You don’t have to contribute to their greed and that’s the power paying cash offers.

3. You don’t have to work. We can’t count the number of people we’ve run into who have to work or face bankruptcy, and some multiple times! If you don’t have cash — and can get even a small home with modest utilities and taxes and save something up to provide a few years of cushion, you can take off work for extended periods of time. You stop being a wage slave.”

Sound interesting?  Here is the link to get our eBook for free between April 5-9.

Speaking of Strategic Living – Subscribe Now

At the beginning of the year, I did a gentle roll out of my new Strategic Living website.  There is not much content and the site is still a bit rough around the edges but I expect things to pick up in earnest early this summer.

Want to be the first to learn about new articles being posted to the site?

Subscribe to Strategic Living

I also have a Facebook page where I will be continuing the tradition of posting free eBooks.  The difference is that the Strategic Living FB page will focus more on DIY, Cooking, Essential Oils, and, topics to related to living and being awesome.

The Final Word

I am keeping this brief because I need to get back to unpacking and organizing my preps.  When I can once again see the forest through the trees, I promise to share what moving is like, prepper-style!

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!


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The post Get 11 Steps to Living a Strategic Life for Free appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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How To Prepare For An Earthquake

How To Prepare For An Earthquake | Quake | PreparednessSurvival

The post How To Prepare For An Earthquake appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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10 Basic Household Items to Use in a Survival Situation

10 Basic Household Items to Use in a Survival Situation | dental-floss-1024x682 | PreparednessSurvival

No matter how prepared you are, survival is really about making the most of what you have on hand. Did you know there are many items sitting around your house that can protect you, no matter what kind of catastrophe strikes?

If this list is any indication, women may be the ones to stick closest to since they have some of the most useful items. If you aren’t one, hopefully, you will know one since they likely will have the best multi-purpose goods when the SHTF.

Household Items To Use When Disaster Strikes

No matter what you have in your storehouse, supplies can run out or you may not have prepared for every eventuality. If you are in a pinch, here are some household items that can mean the difference between life and death in a survival situation.

1.  Tampons and Pads

These two have a variety of uses. Pads are obviously an excellent way to staunch blood if someone suffers a serious wound, but they are also a great way to filter water. Tampons can do a lot of the same work. They can be used to filter water when they are fluffed out, and the string makes an excellent wick. They can both be used for tinder as well.

2.  Dried Kitchen Sponges

These sponges — like those you get at William-Sonoma — were the inspiration for U.S. Military’s tool, XStat, which works similar to a fix-a-flat. Its purpose was to stop gunshot and shrapnel wounds from bleeding out. Since XStat isn’t lying around the house, those super-compressed sponges can be used to do the same thing, though it may take a little finesse without the syringe.

3.  Bras

Snip a bra down the middle front and you have two fairly reasonable particulate filters that can be used as facemasks. You can even use the straps to tie it around the face for hand-free use. Underwire could also come in handy when metal becomes a need, the elastic straps make useful slings and, if the bras are padded, the padding can be used for tinder.

4.  Air Compressor

Air compressors will be great to have on hand in a survival situation for many reasons. Perhaps one of the most crucial is for skinning meat after a kill. Cut a small hole in the thigh of a deer you have killed and hung, insert the air compressor nozzle, and voila, the skin becomes detached from the meat.

5.  Canned Tuna

No matter the situation, wasting food isn’t a good idea. Some foods, however, are packaged in such a way that also makes them good for survival. Not much can beat canned tuna when the SHTF since it can be used as a food source and an oil lamp.

Make sure it’s oil-packed tuna, then stab a hole in the top. Use the tampon string or some newspaper as a wick and shove it into the hole, leaving about a ½” exposed. Give the oil time to soak to the wick, then light it. A can of oil-packed tuna will burn for about two hours, and the fish is still good for eating after.

6.  Chapstick

Chapstick can be used to protect lips, faces and hands against the elements in a survival situation, but it may be more important as a candle. Use wire from a bra to work the tampon-wick into the top of the chapstick. Light it up, and continue to push the chapstick up to keep the tube from melting. It should work as a candle for about two hours. Lip balm in a can works well for this, too.

7.  Alcohol

Because it can increase dehydration, most preppers don’t think to stockpile alcohol, but it can mean the difference between life and death in some situations. It’s a disinfectant, so it can be used to treat wounds and calm the injured person down. Among other uses, it can:

  • Clean a gun
  • Cook an egg
  • Kill bacteria and mold
  • Start a fire

8.  Dental Floss

More than for your mouth’s hygiene, dental floss has an unending list of uses.  It can suture a wound, seal pipes, kill a chicken, be used as a fishing line and to fix broken eyeglasses. In any situation where you might need string it can be handy, but its portability and strength make it effective beyond even that.

9.  Coffee Filters and Coffee Grounds

Prepping sometimes involves taking what no longer has traditional use and using it for survival. Coffee filters can filter water and be used as tinder, but coffee grounds are just as important. Coffee grounds can melt ice, repel pests and be used as fertilizer.

10.  Pantyhose

You can now stop throwing away pantyhose after you get a run. Add them to your stockpile because they have myriad uses. They can be used to carry things, prevent blisters, as mosquito netting, to filter water and to sprout seeds.

The Final Word

Alongside the traditional items to stockpile like salt, water, and canned goods, consider keeping a few of these items on hand. What may seem like common items that get you through your day can also help you survive a crisis. The key to survival is thinking ahead, so look beyond the prescribed use of everyday items in your home and prepare today for anything that could happen tomorrow.

Author Bio: Bobbi Peterson loves writing and regularly posts on her blog Living Life Green. She’s also a freelance writer, green living advocate and environmentalist. You can find more from Bobbi on Twitter.

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!


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The post 10 Basic Household Items to Use in a Survival Situation appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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