99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand

99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | preppers | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests

Prepping isn’t all about wiling away your hours in a bunker, reloading ammo. It’s about the everyday things we do and the differences in our mindsets from non-preppers, and these are things that only real preppers will understand.

Preppers know these are actually signs of sanity, but we get used to being misunderstood by the unprepared and the mainstream media, who all seem to think that we’re crazy. Sometimes it’s fun to have a good laugh about their misconceptions of what we actually do.

You might be a prepper if these signs relate to you.

Many of the following signs will be so relatable that they’ll probably give you a warm glow. Feel the prepper solidarity!

  1. Pantries are so mainstream…you have food stashed in strange places in every room of the house.
  2. You have enough toilet paper to get through a year of uncomfortable digestive upsets…occurring with 6 people simultaneously
  3. Speaking of which, you possess at least 3 different ways to use the bathroom, only one of which is an actual bathroom.
  4. Your kids know what OPSEC means…at the age of 4.
  5. You have topographical maps of your area…plural.
  6. When you’re forced to interact with “the others” you feel like you are awkwardly censoring your true opinions
  7. You think nothing of treating an injury or illness yourself because “what if there was no doctor?
  8. Paintball and laser tag99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B006QHC8VU | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests  are no longer just a fun way to spend an afternoon  …they are tactical training.
  9. You’ve purchased duct tape in bulk.
  10. With every major purchase, you contemplate going for the off-grid version.
  11. You have more manual tools than power tools.
  12. You’ve washed entire loads of laundry by hand for either necessity or practice. (And not just your dainties…we’re talking about jeans and stuff!)
  13. Your kids are not afraid of guns…or fingers pointed like guns…or pastries in the shape of guns…or drawings of guns.
  14. When house-hunting you look for multiple heat and water sources.
  15. You store food in buckets…lots of buckets…like, maybe even a whole room full of buckets.
  16. You garden with a determination and time commitment normally reserved for endurance athletes training for an Ironman triathlon.
  17. If you don’t have a water source on your property, you have put in miles of footwork searching for one nearby, and have mapped multiple discreet routes to and from the source, and figured out how to haul the water back to your house on each route.
  18. Your first instinct when hearing about some event on the mainstream news is skepticism. (False flag event, anyone?)
  19. You read articles about multiple ways to use white vinegar and nod your head throughout.
  20. You believe that FEMA camps are real and that you are most likely on “The List”.
  21. Instead of CNN, you have alternative news sites bookmarked in your favorites on your computer.
  22. You have enough coffee/tea/favorite-caffeinated-item-of-choice to last you through 3 apocalypses.
  23. You could outfit a small-town pharmacy with all of the over-the-counter medications you have stashed away.
  24. You have an instinctive mistrust of anyone working for the government.
  25. You could sink a ship with the weight of your stored ammo. In fact, you put it in the basement when you became concerned about your floorboards.
  26. Looking for a fun weekend outing with the kids? Forget amusement parks –  the shooting range is where it’s at.
  27. When the power goes out, you calmly light the candles and proceed with whatever you had been dong previously.
  28. A longer-term power outage is called “practice”.
  29. If a like-minded person comes over to your house, they’ll realize you are “one of them” by seeing your reading material. Other folks won’t even notice. The FBI might call your copy of The Prepper’s Blueprint and your A. American fiction  “subversive literature”.
  30. Your children carry a modified bug-out kit in their school backpacks.
  31. You can and dehydrate food with the single-minded fervor of an Amish grandmother facing a 7-year drought.
  32. Calling 911 is not part of your home security plan.
  33. You spend your days off digging an underground bunker in your backyard.
  34. You have more than a thousand cheapo lighters that you purchased in bulk, stashed away in the back of your linen closet…and you don’t even smoke.
  35. You eat a lot of survival food now, so there is no ‘system shock’ when you are forced to eat only the items you have stocked (or that you GROW – hint hint).
  36. You stock alcohol in mass quantities so you can comfortably numb after the SHTF.
  37. You stock alcohol in mass quantities – and you don’t even drink. (Barter, baby!)
  38. You know what? Forget stocking alcohol.  You have your own still99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B00A943BFI | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests .  You’ll make alcohol.
  39. You have enough salt to create another Dead Sea.
  40. You don’t move – you strategically relocate.
  41. You purchased 50 of these little EDC multitaskers 99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B006E0QAFY | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests already for stocking stuffers for your friends/family/workmates/neighbor/random stranger.
  42. Speaking of Christmas, you gave Conflicted to everyone last year.
  43. When your friends ask about your favorite authors, instead of Hemmingway, Tolkien, or Kerouac, you get a blank stare when you tell them it’s John ‘Lofty’ Wiseman99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=ur2&o=1 | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests .
  44. You know exactly how many Mountain House buckets 99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B00955DUHQ | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests it takes to make a base for a single bed.
  45. You don’t stock up on milk. You get an actual cow.
  46. Your family doesn’t dare take something from the food stockpile without marking it off the list.
  47. Your kids know how to don a gas mask in 30 seconds.
  48. Everyone in your survival group carries the same firearm so that ammo is standardized.
  49. You have non-electric versions of appliances like wheat grinders99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B0038NPJVG | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests , washing machines99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B002C8HR9A | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests , and coffee makers99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B0000CFLCT | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests .
  50. You yell at the TV every time a commercial for Doomsday Preppers comes on.  Oh. Wait. You don’t have a TV. But if you did, you’d yell, because you know how positively ridiculous and unrealistic that show is.
  51. Your family is no longer surprised when you announce, “Hey, we’re going to learn how to make (insert anything here)!”
  52. You have more how-to books stored on hard-drives than most public libraries have on the bookshelves.
  53. Your children have a plan in case they need to bug out from school.
  54. Alternatively, you homeschool and bugging out is part of the curriculum.
  55. You have more than three ways to cook dinner if the power goes out: a woodstove, a barbecue, a sun oven99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B00C9OV8VK | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests , a fire-pit, and/or a volcano stove99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B000FDKXN6 | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests .
  56. First Blood99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B0004Z33EG | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests and Red Dawn 99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B005QG2DGC | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests are basic training films for your family.
  57. You have long since accepted the idea that if you’re not on someone’s list, you’re probably not doing it right.
  58. Your 7-year-old knows Morse code.
  59. You’re secretly disappointed when the electricity comes back on after only a few minutes.
  60. You know more ways to make a homemade knife than the entire population of your local prison combined.
  61. You don’t just rotate food, you rotate ammo.
  62. You know the distance from your door to your front gate is precisely 207 yards.
  63. Moving to a new house is no longer “moving”, but “strategic relocation99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=1568612621 | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests “.
  64. You have mapped out at least 3 different routes by car and 2 different routes on foot to get to your bug-out location.
  65. You know the difference between “Tyvek99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B00821J4JC | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests ” and “Tychem99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B005QQFHI8 | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests ” suits, and in which instance they should be used.
  66. Ditto the finer points of N-95 99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B0002YKBV2 | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests vs. N-10099 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B008MCV43K | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests masks.
  67. You watch The Walking Dead99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=ur2&o=1 | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests  in order to critique their survival tactics. (And you were secretly delighted to see Beth building a fire in a Dakota pit.)
  68. Speaking of fire, you can start one in at least 3 different ways, and you always carry a lighter, a fresnel lens99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B005MPREQ6 | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests , and a magnesium firestarter99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B0013L2DKU | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests .
  69. You have two (or more) of everything important, well, because “one is none.”
  70. You have a decoy food supply.
  71. Your kids think it’s a fun game to see who can find the most potential weapons in a room.
  72. Even your dog has a bug out bag99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand | ir?t=prepping0a-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B000HJJHXK | News Articles PreparednessSurvival Special Interests  – which she carries herself.
  73. You have elected NOT to purchase greater armament because you plan on upgrading with your future assailant’s weaponry.
  74. Your EDC includes a knife, firearm w/extra mag, flashlight, mylar blanket, Chapstick, and an ounce of silver — and that’s just for when you’re walking the dog.
  75. The trunk of your car has enough supplies to carry the family through an entire week during a major blizzard.
  76. One criterion for your new winter coat is that it fits over your body armor.
  77. Your neighbors separate their compost for you into a) chicken food b) garden food and c) other
  78. You scour travel size aisles because they fit better in bug-out bags and they make great barter items.
  79. You check out the garden center and pest control section for potential weapons.
  80. Your subscribed channels for YouTube and bookmarks now contain more prepper and alternative media sites than cute animal sites.
  81. Christmas and birthday gifts have a prepper theme.
  82. You actually know what the letters “EMP” stand for.
  83. Every time there is a small household “disaster” like a power outage or local water “boil order” you just grab your emergency supplies and remind dubious family members. “See, told you it pays to be prepared.”
  84. Your freeze-dried food has a longer expiration date than you do
  85. You know how to make bows out of skis and arrows out of garden bamboo.
  86. You have (or are seriously considering, buying) an old armored personnel carrier to turn into your RV.
  87. You know that Falling Skies has better idea for post-apocalyptic survival than The Walking Dead or Z Nation but you still watch them all just in case
  88. Your friend asks “Do you have enough bullets?” then you both laugh and laugh because you know you can never have enough.
  89. You changed your home page from MSN (or any other propaganda media) to Drudge Report or SHTFplan.
  90. You have no problem knocking on strangers’ doors to ask for fruit tree cuttings
  91. You have vacuum packed underwear in a plastic tub stashed somewhere in your house
  92. You just might have more medical supplies than the local ER.
  93. The Co-op and Costco recognize you but pretend not to. They know better than to ask questions about your purchases.
  94. If you’re a man you are no longer embarrassed to buy tampons and sanitary napkins because they make great bandages.
  95. If you’re a woman you know you don’t need to buy tampons or sanitary napkins because so many other options exist.
  96.  You actually own a toilet seat that fits on a bucket.
  97. You have enough wood cut and stacked to form a barricade around your whole property.
  98. Admit it. Every time the power goes out, you go see if your car starts so you can get the jump on hunkering down or buying out the store with case in the event that this one is actually an EMP.
  99. You have considered filtering water with a coffee filter or a t-shirt.

Do you have more prepper signs to add?

These signs that you might be one of those “crazy preppers” are consolidated from the hive mind of two previous articles and comments from the readers. (Find them here and here.) Do you have more signs to add?  Share them in the comments section below.


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Agenda For Change: The American Prepper Movement

Agenda For Change: The American Prepper Movement | proverbs-27-12 | PreparednessSurvival

A while back when I posted Define the Prepper Movement With A Call Action, I did not know what to expect.  One part of me thought, okay, I am going to put this out there and be run out of town for expressing such crazy ideas.  The other part of me dictated that I post the article because I believed in it.  Not posting would be paramount to selling out to what was popular as well as profitable in the prepper blogging community.

Selling out is not in my DNA so I went ahead and shared the think piece by Richard Earl Broome, and much to my delight, it found a thoughtful and passionate audience here at Backdoor Survival.  I was pleased.

The next question, of course, is where do we go from here.

In today’s think piece, Richard kicks things up a notch and suggests that we take some time to develop a mission statement for the American Prepper Movement.

An Agenda for Change: “Power to the Preppers”

Before anyone ever thinks about starting a movement, you need to look at previous movements that were successful and truly did drive change. Two that immediately come to mind are the Civil Rights and Anti Vietnam War movements. What made them successful?

At their origins both seemed to have disparate pockets of political activism, with members that seemed to be just fringe agitators. Over time these disparate pockets integrated and became more respected. As a result, the beliefs they represented became more forceful and powerful because each managed to achieve discipline within a common agenda of fighting against true injustice.

Once more cohesive, they also became increasingly focused and articulate with arguments that created a coherent and compelling agenda for change. Eventually, both had a seat at the national table and helped drive new laws, the Voting Rights Act of 1964, and a new national policy, the elimination of the military draft in 1973.

Why is it important for Preppers of all shapes, sizes and interests to try to find a common ground and organize a movement like this?

At present, Preppers are mostly dismissed as a group outside of the mainstream. Yet as a community, we are more knowledgeable and better prepared to meet the increasing level of threatening events facing us than almost everyone else. As a disparate group, with no common agenda that Preppers agree upon, we currently have little influence or power when it is most needed.

The American Prepper Movement must have a voice at the federal, state and local level with regard to policy, planning, budgeting and legislation. To achieve a seat at the table, Preppers need to become more focused, disciplined and articulate and represent a powerful voting bloc with a clear and coherent agenda for change that elected officials will respect.

What do you think needs to be a part of the American Prepper Nation agenda?

First, let us all accept the premise that there is a new global reality. Terrorism, cyber attacks, pandemic threats, etc., have reached all nations, and as we most recently witnessed with the Boston Marathon bombing last spring and now in France, this is no longer just happening somewhere else in the world. It is a clear and present danger to all of us. A war on all citizens is underway. We have squandered the time we had to prepare for it, so like our nation after Pearl Harbor some seventy-three years ago, we need to catch up and right now.

We are only at the beginning of a discussion about what I think is the critical Prepper Agenda for Change. Here are some ideas, most of which are from the readers of Backdoor Survival in response to my December 30th, 2014 think piece on Backdoor Survival, “Do Not Go Gentle Into the Night.” We seemed to think the Prepper Agenda for Change was in four categories:

–First, develop a mission statement that we all would agree articulates what the Prepper movement is really about.

The media tends to have a cynical view of prepping, which impacts the psychology of most uninformed audiences, and gives the impression we are all slightly odd and not to be taken seriously. Yet, you can go to Ready.gov and see very similar advice for the entire nation coming from FEMA. So we are, in fact, just doing what our government asks.

We also know that we can give better advice to our fellow citizens than the bureaucrats in Washington D.C. do, and on much a wider range of topics. We need our more informed, experienced Prepper voices heard.

A starting point would be our mission statement for the American Prepper Movement. How about we start a Proverb as our inspiration, and then the readers of Backdoor Survival can add their own thoughts?

Proverbs 27:12 “A prudent person foresees the danger ahead and takes precautions. The simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences.”

–Second, what can we learn from others?

We created the Department of Homeland Security twelve years ago. The State of Israel was founded sixty-seven years ago. The State of Israel has been focused on the preparedness of their citizens since the nation was founded.

What policies should our federal, state and local governments adopt from Israel, particularly around citizen preparedness? We are not yet under a direct and constant threat as Israel experiences, but the threat to the USA is steadily growing. Now is the time to step back, re-examine ourselves, and start making bold changes.

For example, Israel makes civilian preparedness and resiliency part of their education curriculum. Students learn the importance of being prepared and have both historical lessons about terrorism along with “hands on” learning experiences to develop skills with first aid, CPR, chemical and biological weapons, the use of gas masks, and so on. High school students are expected to actively support the local Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), during an emergency.

Israel’s Home Front Command also uses consistent, straightforward messaging to the citizens of Israel about threats or possible events. Israel, with these policies, has achieved a genuine culture of preparedness.

So should the United States.

–Third, with all these kinds of actions we can begin to shift the psychology of Americans.

A recent article I wrote for Backdoor Survival was “Building a Culture of Preparedness.” I used the following quote in my article as a metaphor, to illustrate how our view of heath and fitness has changed over the last 50 years.

“If you have ever watched the TV show, “Mad Men,” on many levels it is both fascinating and a little horrifying. We did act that way. We drank too much, smoked, and ate whatever we pleased. Exercise was that occasional game of tennis or golf. This has all changed for the better. We pay more attention to diet, nutrition, exercise and avoid doing the things we know hurt us. Over time, as a society, we developed a culture of health and fitness. It took us years, but we made the cultural shift. What caused this was that we all raised our level of understanding about causes and effects and the ultimate impacts of poor choices about heath and fitness.

To achieve a similar kind of a societal-wide transition for better preparedness, by fostering the community discussions that I am proposing in this article, over time, could start to create and begin to build an overall culture of preparedness.”

We need to raise our level of national understanding about the importance of preparedness. If we are ever going to be truly prepared, this kind of a psychological shift by Americans is a fundamental requirement. Israel did it. So can we.

–Fourth, during future events Preppers more likely to shoulder most the burden of the threats to our safety because we, as a nation, allow others to remain less prepared.

Your federal, state and local tax dollars that go to emergency preparedness will be spent on those who are not prepared. Preppers will perhaps need, little to no help, which makes Preppers the ants paying for the grasshoppers.

If we, as a nation, will subsidize someone for putting solar panels on their roof to achieve energy efficiencies, why not advocate subsidizing Preppers for better overall preparedness? Shouldn’t Preppers get some sort of tax break for being a better-prepared citizen? Shouldn’t this be reflected in lower insurance bills for you?

A great side benefit if this actually happened would be the creation of a national standard for both individual and business preparedness. If this is ever created, the Prepper Nation definitely must have a voice in any kind of a preparedness standard.

Where do we go from here?

If we can agree on the basic tenets of a mission statement and agenda for change, we then have the fundamental pieces to begin to organize into a movement. With these we can start to address the simple; yet critical question: Where do we go from here?

Robert Kennedy one said:

“Few will have the greatness to bend history itself; but each of us can work to change a small portion of events, and in the total of all those acts, will be written the history of this generation.”

Each of us needs to do our small part and write the history of the beginnings of the American Prepper Movement.

Richard Earl Broome –  All Rights Reserved
February 4, 2015

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Richard Earl Broome is a contributing author and friend to Backdoor Survival. He has lived an extraordinary life rising from an Army private to an Army colonel who served on the White House staff for two Presidents of the United States as a member of their National Security Council staff.
He is considered a national expert on the subjects of crisis management, disaster recovery and survival. He is a frequent contributor of articles about the many threats facing our society, appearing frequently on radio shows to discuss issues such as pandemics, ISIS, and the cyber threat.
For more about Richard, visit my  About Richard page.  Also, note that his two books, Leaving The Trees and Good Crazy (Leaving The Trees Journey) (Volume 2)Agenda For Change: The American Prepper Movement | ir?t=continmoti-20&l=as2&o=1&a=1500505781 | PreparednessSurvival , can be found on Amazon.

The Final Word

As with all things preparedness, at first blush the task of preparing a mission statement may seem overwhelming.  After all, there is not only the effort of putting pencil to paper, but also the coordination of missives coming from various age groups, economic strata, and geographical locations. Each will have their own special needs and their own special interests.

The challenge going forward is to set aside our personal agendas and move toward a common goal for all preppers.  I know from reading your comments that there are plenty of you set to lead and an equal number set to follow with gumption and gusto.  Everyone is important.

Now it is your turn.  Let us continue brainstorm together; comments are open.

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!


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Prepping In Real Life: It is Never Too Late to Change Course

Prepping In Real Life: It is Never Too Late to Change Course | escape-from-fishy-life-background-700x438 | PreparednessSurvival

There is no other way to begin this article than to simply begin.

Back in the day, meaning 2011 and 2012, survivalist preppers were a curiosity. Those of us that chose this journey ended up soldiering their way through a maze of trial and error, amassing supplies and traditional skills that would carry us through the next apocalypse.

Early on, I chose to refer to the next apocalypse as a “disruptive event” and the label stuck.  Whether a natural disaster, economic collapse, or manmade event, it was always my feeling that a broad foundation of self-sufficiency would carry us through the worst of times.

And so it has been for all these years.

Do you ever feel like a fish out of water? If so, you are not alone.

Unfortunately, so many years later, I find that prepping has become an industry filled with bad information, shoddy ethics, and fraud.  I am saddened by all of this, so much so that there are days I want to give it up lest I am caught up in a cycle where raw capitalism supersedes common sense education.

But I digress.

In this newest Backdoor Survival think piece, I would like to challenge you to take a look at yourself and your needs and judge yourself by your own standards and not those of someone else.  I ask you to walk the walk and stay true to your core belief system so that you can become as prepared as you need to be.  No more, and no less.

To help you along, I am including an excerpt from Dan Chiras’ book, Things I Learned Too Late In Life: It’s Never Too Late To Be Who You Might Have Been.  It has helped me a lot, and I hope it helps you, too.

It’s Never too Late to Be Who You Might Have Been

Most of us live two lives: a secret inner life decorated with high ideals and moral principles, and an outer real life in which we often abandon or compromise our morals and ideals, sometimes our most cherished ideals, for the sake of expediency, fitting in, getting by, or hundreds of other flimsy excuses.

In essence, each of us is a complex mixture of who we are and who we’d like to be. No wonder that we’re each a conflicting maze of emotions and ideas and actions.

At a keynote address at a conference at the University of Colorado in the 1990s, a prominent health-food advocate told her audience, “Don’t judge me by my cupboards.” She went on to explain that her children insisted on her buying all kinds of less-than-healthy goodies – cereals loaded with food dyes and, of course, dripping with sugar. All these products violated her beliefs – and teachings — about sound nutrition.

I fully understand and sympathize with her and don’t stand in judgment. All parents know how difficult it is to get our children to eat right. I offer this anecdote, however, as an example of one of many often powerful forces that steer us off the path of being – or becoming — who we really want to be – in this case, our children’s unrelenting and plaintive whining.

This speaker’s proclamation was just one example of how we all live lives nagged by many niggling little white lies – believing in one thing, acting in ways that contradict our beliefs.

Bottom line, however, when all is said and done, we have to judge ourselves by what’s in our cupboards, not by the slogans on the bumper stickers on our cars or the T shirts we wear on weekends.

What we do is who we are. We are not what we believe in but fail to do or be.

The Final Word

When it comes to prepping, talk is cheap. It is the doing that is expensive.  As I learned from Dan’s book, “walking your talk” takes time, energy, money, and commitment.

My wish for all of you is that you continue to walk your talk. Do it your way.  And when in doubt, ask a lot of questions.  If something smells wrong, most likely it is wrong. Go with your gut instincts, instead.

Prepping, and being a survivalist prepper, is hard work so define your needs, and go from there.  Be true to yourself and your moral compass and you can not and will not go astray.

And that, as I like to say, is all I am going to say about that.

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!


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How to Survive World War 3: Prepping for an Off-Shore Conflict

How to Survive World War 3: Prepping for an Off-Shore Conflict | How-to-survive-an-off-shore-conflict | PreparednessSurvival Sleuth Journal Special Interests War Propaganda

If an all-out war erupts, it will be like nothing the Earth has seen before. All of our “progress” means that each side now has the weapons at their disposal to destroy their enemy many times over. Because of this, we can’t as readily look back in history to learn how to survive World War 3.

Most of the time, when I write an article, it’s based on research or personal experience. I can find times when the incident has occurred in the past and study them. I can learn what catastrophes came hand-in-hand, and analyze what we need to know ahead of time to survive. The potential of a conflict like WWIII is quite different because, during the last World War, our technology was a drop in the bucket compared to what is now available. The situation we have now is called MAD – Mutually Assured Destruction – and the acronym couldn’t be any more accurate because it’s utter madness to destroy our world.

I have to be honest. This is based on speculation because we just don’t know how it would play out. It’s based on the most likely consequences, on what I know of our economy, on how wars have played out for ordinary citizens in the past, and on what I know of general preparedness. Earlier this week, I posted a compilation of reader’s comments about what we could face if we went to war. You can read that article here.

If there are developments, I’ll send out alerts via email, so make sure  you’re signed up to the newsletter.)

What this article is not about

There are some topics I won’t be covering in this article.

Current events: This won’t cover the current bombings, sabre-rattling, and incidents. I recommend the following sources for that coverage:

The dubious morality of war: A lot of folks seem to be thrilled at the concept of war. They don’t seem to comprehend that whatever our military does to another country, someone else could come along and do to us. The stuff I saw on social media reminded me of that naive scene in Gone with the Wind, when Civil War was declared and all the young men at the barbecue were whooping with excitement, having no idea of the horrors and brutality that would soon occur.

The United States is not untouchable, and I won’t even discuss the dubious morality of war. All I’ll say to those folks who are cheering from the sidelines and treating it like a football game, “You have no idea what you’re asking for.”

Nuclear war: Although a nuclear strike is a possibility, that isn’t a topic that will be covered in this article. That horrible prospect requires far more than I can provide in the scope of a single article. (Here’s some basic information on surviving a nuclear strike and you can look for a very thorough upcoming crash course on the topic at Preppers University – sign up here to get on the email list so you’ll be alerted when it is available.)

Attacks on American soil: This article is pretty long already and that topic deserves its own article – look for it next week.

Rainbows and Unicorns: And finally, before we get started, a quick note to all of the people who scorn articles like this as “fear-mongering:

Is it less frightening to face a situation with no knowledge of how it might play out? Is it preferable to be blithely unaware of what might befall us? Would you rather it all be a horrible shock for which you are completely unprepared? If that’s your philosophy, stop reading now. I’d hate to ruin the surprise for you. Go ahead and believe in unicorns and rainbows.

For the rest of us, who want to give our families the best possible odds, read on.

Prepping to Survive World War 3

In a non-nuclear conflict, there are two possible scenarios: fighting in distant lands and conflict on our soil. Many of the preparations are the same, so we’ll start with involvement from a distance.

Economic Ramifications

While some people will become mind-blowingly wealthy due to war, it won’t be ordinary folks like us. If previous World Wars are a good indicator, we’ll be asked to make sacrifices to “support” our soldiers.Think about all of the WW2 propaganda posters that encourage people to raise their own food, to go without certain items, and to whole-heartedly embrace rations. I can assure you that people who own stock in defense companies won’t be dining on pigeon and squirrel, but I can’t say the same for the rest of us.

Whether you wish to live frugally or not, it will be forced upon all but the most well-to-do.  This is in part due to shortages (which we’ll discuss below) that will drive up the cost of consumer products. The price of transportation will also increase due to inflated gasoline prices, and this will affect the cost of every single good that has to be transported across any distance.

It’s likely that jobs will be available, due to increased enlistment in the military. (This could be due to a draft or simply voluntary sign-ups.) However, the money you make will have to go much further to combat the price increases.

Here are some immediate steps you can take to help counteract these potential economic ramifications. And if nothing bad happens, this won’t go the way of the Y2K preps. All of these are logical and reasonable steps for anyone to take to protect themselves from a financial downturn.

Stock up NOW. There’s no time to waste, given current global tensions. You need to have as much food quietly stashed away as possible. Remember that hungry friends and neighbors can be a threat later if you have food and they don’t, so keep your preps on the down-low.

Enact your self-reliance strategies NOW.  If you’ve been idly pondering the idea of a garden or a few chickens, put those plans into action. Raising food isn’t as easy as throwing some seeds in the dirt or erecting a chicken coop and tossing the birds a handful of grain now and then. Thinking that a survival homestead is something you can do later, on the spur of the moment is a terrible – and potentially deadly – mistake.

Keep cash on hand. In a crisis, banks often close and if this happens you won’t be able to access your money. Another possibility is that a cyber attack could cripple the financial system. Keep at least enough cash for a month’s worth of expenses. Have the cash in small denominations so that you won’t have to try and get change during an emergency.

Invest in precious metals. For many of us, the best investment is tangible goods like food, tools, and homesteading supplies. However, if you are in a situation in which you have wealth to guard, the best way to do this is with precious metals. Gold and silver will hold their value even if the dollar goes under.

Learn to live frugally. Living beneath your means will help you survive potential economic woes.

Focus on general preparedness. Aside from the specifics mentioned above, do everything you can to become more prepared in a general way. This will help you take any difficulties in stride.

Shortages That We Could Expect

Another issue that comes hand in hand with war is shortages. We live in a country that runs on imports. The US has a trade deficit of over $500 billion. (source) This means that we import far more than we export, which could be a massive issue in the event of a war. This could happen in a few different ways:

  • Another country could halt our supply routes
  • Other countries could refuse to do business with us
  • Prices could rise dramatically due to the conflict from increased transportation costs, worries about safety risks during transport, or by the countries from which we import suffering their own shortages.

When President Trump was inaugurated and said that he was going to tax imports, many articles were written about how an import tax could affect our cost of living. The same information is applicable if you look at it through the scope of war. Although the imports wouldn’t necessarily be taxed, we’d be looking at similar shortages. (This article on Consumer Reports gives an excellent overview on what could be affected due to an import tax.)

Here are some of the shortages we could anticipate and supporting links to help you prep for them:

Gasoline: A fuel shortage will, quite literally, affect everything. It will increase the cost of goods because getting them from one side of the country to the other will be more expensive. It will cause shortages because importing the goods into the country from elsewhere will be more difficult and costly. The ability to travel or commute will be affected for many people, causing it to be more difficult to get to work or school. Our worlds will get much smaller in such a situation.

This could happen in a few different ways. First, our fuel could be diverted to the war effort, or secondly, since a quarter of our petroleum comes from other countries (source), a shortage could evolve the same way as shortages of consumer goods, as addressed above.

Food: For all of the reasons mentioned above, we could be facing food shortages. America imports $130 billion per year worth of food, and we have all become accustomed to blueberries in December and bananas on demand. In 2011, statistics showed that 20% of our food is imported with particular emphasis on seafood (70%) and produce (35%).  With droughts and weather concerns plaguing agricultural hubs of the country over the past few years, this percentage has surely risen, although I was unable to find specific recent statistics.

Prescription medications: We are also a nation that is heavily reliant on prescription medications, many of which are made offshore. A whopping 80% of our prescription drugs are imported, according to the FDA website. In the event of a war that halts imports, the almost 70% of Americans who regularly rely on prescription drugs will be in big trouble.

Shortages of prescription medications could result in increased use of medical facilities due to uncontrolled heart conditions, diabetes, or other chronic ailments. This could cause reduced access to physicians, fewer available beds in hospitals, and higher prices for drugs that are available.

  • Sign up here to get a special report on Venezuela that discusses the medical crisis there that erupted due to pharmaceutical shortages. (It also lists the other things that they ran out of first during their own economic crisis.)
  • Look for options other than pharmaceutical for a backup plan. This book is loaded with natural remedies in the event that meds are no longer available.
  • Do your best to reduce your reliance on prescription medications if you can at all. Some health conditions can be managed with good nutrition. If you have an underlying issue that can be taken care of, do so now.

Power: In previous conflicts, power has been rationed in some parts of the world. This could be anything from predictable rolling blackouts to cutting power entirely in order to “support the war effort.”

Of course, during WW2, people were less reliant on electronics for every facet of their lives. Now, we are all completely hooked into the grid. Most folks rely on it for everything: information,  warmth, communication, money, and food storage. If that grid was no longer reliable, everything would change and some people would have a lot of difficulty adapting.

If your budget is tight, I strongly recommend against investing in a generator. First of all, they’re expensive and that money can be spent elsewhere. Unless it is solar, you’ll have to have fuel to run it. And it’s a pretty safe bet that if electricity is rationed, fuel will be outrageously expensive and difficult to acquire.

What if the conflict hits American soil?

The last time there was war on the American mainland was during the American Civil War. The next article in this series will discuss ways to prepare for the potential of conflict if it comes to us. Be sure to sign up for the newsletter so you don’t miss it.

Part 1: Is World War 3 Coming? 18 Preppers Discuss Effects, Shortages, and How to Get Ready

Part 2: How to Survive World War 3: Prepping for an Off-Shore Conflict

Part 3: How to Survive World War 3: Prepping in Case the Fight Comes to Us (coming soon)


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The post How to Survive World War 3: Prepping for an Off-Shore Conflict appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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Secret Sniper Technique Revealed: Ballistic Loophole Shooting (VIDEO)

Secret Sniper Technique Revealed: Ballistic Loophole Shooting (VIDEO) | brandon-precision | Multimedia PreparednessSurvival Special Interests

First, I brought you a practical method for easily building a ghillie suit which defeats thermal imaging (FLIR).  Now, I’ve decided to create an entire YouTube channel dedicated to equipping the citizenry with advanced means of self defense.

Guerrilla Think Tank is a project created by Brandon Smith of Alt-Market.com focused specifically on training, tactics and outside the box thinking.  We will study alternative means by which the general liberty-loving public can counter an advanced aggressor with the sometimes meager means at their disposal.  We will also study the psychology behind propaganda and how to recognize it, as well as study geopolitical events around the world and the perhaps unseen influences they can have on the future.   In short, Guerilla Think Tank is about asymmetric thinking and dismantling seemingly insurmountable threats with simple but unique solutions.

My first video teaches the long “secret” method of shooting at any distance through a ballistic loophole; effectively making the shooter invisible to observation.  Be sure to give the video a thumbs-up and subscribe to Guerrilla Think Tank if you liked it:

If you want Alt-Market to produce more videos like this one, consider sending a donation for our Guerrilla Think Tank fund.  There is a lot more training info on the way that you probably won’t find anywhere else!  Visit our donations page here: http://www.alt-market.com/donate

This article was republished from Alt-Market.com.


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Source: Alternative news journal

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Why Preppers Should Spend More Time Learning (and Less Time Shopping)

Why Preppers Should Spend More Time Learning (and Less Time Shopping) | Why-preppers-should-spend-more-time-learning | PreparednessSurvival
Hey – you, with the shovel.  Stop building that bunker. I want to ask you a question. Also, you – the folks with the shopping cart full of shelf-stable food. Hold on a minute.
How much time do you spend learning?
And by learning, I don’t mean some required on-the-job training or skimming over an article here and there. I mean a time that you set aside on a regular basis, whether it is weekly or daily, to focus all of your attention on something you need to learn.
Many people, once they get out of school, don’t spend a lot of time in study. As far as actual, scheduled study time, it’s gone along with their childhoods once they get their degree or diploma. But recently, when I asked the community what you felt you should focus on to further your preparedness efforts, a huge portion of you said, “Skills and Information.”
Becoming adept or knowledgeable is not going to magically happen without some concentrated effort and some resources. Just owning some books on a topic isn’t enough. You have to delve into it deeply and try it out if you want to be able to depend on that skill or knowledge during a difficult situation.
And best of all, it can never be taken away from you. No government officials doing so “for the greater good.” No jerk whose entire survival plan revolves around taking what you stored. No natural disaster that destroys your homes, your preps, and all your worldly possessions. In a long-term scenario or exteme situation, the only way to be truly prepared is to be able to independently provide for your own needs, without relying on the government, the stores, or the supply chain.
Once you’ve learned something – really learned it and put it into practice – it’s yours forever.
If you’re on a budget, you’re in luck. It often costs very little to obtain the knowledge. Between books, local classes, and online courses, you can get a ton of information and practical steps to take for a very nominal fee. And, sometimes, it’s even free. Of course you need supplies, but stop shopping for a little while and focus on increasing your knowledge. Bonus: Your future purchases will be made with more discretion due to your new information.
But it won’t happen without some determination and some time blocked off specifically for that purpose. You have to learn like your life depends on it.
Because, one day, it could.
First, I’ll provide some of my favorite resources and then I’ll tell you my secrets for making learning a priority.

Build your library

Most of the time, people in the preparedness world like to have hard copies of important information. This way, if the power goes out and you can’t access the internet or recharge your Kindle, you still have access to vital advice.

Some of these books are for just such an event, while others are guides to building your self-reliance skills.  Commit to picking up a good book each pay period until you have a library to reference during any type of scenario. But don’t just buy it and stick it on a shelf. Read that book and put some of the ideas into action. You may not have time to sit down and read 200 pages in the midst of a crisis, right?

My own books are indicated with a star. *

Be sure to check out used bookstores, libraries, and garage sales, too. Look for books that teach self-reliant skills like sewing, gardening, animal husbandry, carpentry, repair manuals, scratch cooking, and plant identification. You can often pick these up for pennies, and older books don’t rely on expensive new technology or tools for doing these tasks.

Bookmark some websites

The internet is a wonderful place, and best of all, a lot of this knowledge can be found for FREE! The more you know about crisis situations, the more ready you will be to face them.

Some sites are friendlier to beginners than others, so if you stumble upon a forum where people seem less than enthusiastic about helping people who are just starting out, don’t let it get you down. Move on and find a site that makes you feel comfortable.  If you see them utter the words, “If you aren’t already prepared, it’s too late,” run, don’t walk, away from them. No one needs that kind of doom and gloom. It’s stressful, unhelpful, and honestly, kind of mean. Plus, I firmly believe it’s never too late as long as you just get started.

To get the most out of a website, I strongly recommend subscribing to the newsletter. For example, I provide information to subscribers that isn’t available on my website, plus I share a lot of personal stories about how preparedness and frugality have helped our family live a comfortable and secure lifestyle. As well, when I find a really cool offer or discount, I can let you know about it ASAP. (You can subscribe to it here and get a free bundle of PDFs of the information readers have found to be the most helpful and inspiring over the years.)

Following are some of my favorite sites, and the link will take you to a good starting point on these sites. In no particular order:

Bookmark these, subscribe to the newsletters, and learn for free!

7 Ways I Make Learning a Priority

You may notice that there are a couple of days per week on which I don’t usually post articles or send newsletters. That’s because, on at least one of them, I learn. I set aside the entire span of my workday for it, too. I don’t mess around. Here’s what my study schedule looks like:
  1. I block off time for it. I have “work hours” even though I’m self-employed because I find it makes me more productive. I get up early, feed animals, grab some coffee, and get to work on the things that require the most concentration. Then, by the time my daughter is up and over her morning muteness, I’m finished with the things that require my undivided attention. I treat Learning Day exactly the same as any other work day.
  2. I catch up on newsletters.  I don’t usually take the time to read newsletters the day they come (there are a couple that are so good I have to, but mostly, I save them in a file on my email. Then, I sit down with my coffee and read them all.
  3. I keep a link document. As you can imagine, with the amount of research I do, I read many articles per week. However, there are dozens more I want to read but just don’t have time at the moment. Instead of losing them to the vagaries of the internet, I have a document to which I paste links all week long so that when I have time, I can sit down and read the articles. Once I’ve read them, I delete them from my list.
  4. I take online courses. Man, I love the internet. I can learn about things that would have cost thousands of dollars and time in a classroom before. Almost everything I learned about homesteading or running an easy-to-use website originated from an online course. On my designated learning day, I catch up with any webinars or assignments.
  5. I listen to podcasts or videos. If the information is presented in a format that I can listen to, I generally do that while I’m doing laundry or working in the kitchen. Those links go into my link document too.
  6. I take notes.  I keep two learning journals. One is for preparedness/homesteading information and the other is for website and business-related stuff. I take notes of the things that inspire me or seem the most applicable to my situation.
  7. I implement what I’ve learned. At the end of my learning session, I make a plan to implement the things I’ve learned. Maybe I add a button to my website that makes it easy for folks to print off the information. Perhaps I figured out a good way to plant a certain vegetable, so I order the seeds. You get the idea.
Now, you may not have an entire day to spare but I’ll bet you could take a few hours away from other activities, right? Having the information at hand can help, but often, in a crisis, seconds count and you won’t want to waste that time looking things up in a book.

Finally, you have to actually do stuff.

You can read and listen to podcasts until the cows come home, but until you actually put what you’ve learned into practice, it will be of as much use to you as the difference between an isosceles triangle and a scalene one – something you learned but never applied.
  • Take a prepping course and actually follow the to-do lists and do the challenges – there is a section each week of low-cost tasks and the challenges don’t cost a penny.
  • Take the master gardening class, make a plan, and produce the best garden ever.
  • Go take that First Aid course and brush up on your skills regularly.
  • Learn 5 ways to light a fire without matches and actually practice until it becomes easy.
  • Involve the family – you can make this fun!

Become a prepared, skillful person takes time. If you’re really serious about it, you’re going to have to commit to more than just stashing away some buckets.

Make learning a priority. It’s the least expensive but most important prep you’ll ever make.


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The post Why Preppers Should Spend More Time Learning (and Less Time Shopping) appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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Get 11 Steps to Living a Strategic Life for Free

Get 11 Steps to Living a Strategic Life for Free | life-options | Off-Grid & Independent Living PreparednessSurvival Special Interests

Things tend to move fast and furious at times and at this moment, such is the case in Backdoor Survival Land. So what is happening?  I am in the process of getting settled at my mountain retreat in Payson, Arizona.  When a prepper moves, it is hectic!

That being said, a couple of days ago I took a break to be interviewed by Todd Sepulveda, the editor of Pepper Website.  He has a new website, The Prepper Website Podcast, and today he is featuring an interview with both me and my BFF, George Ure, who runs the Urban Survival website.

Free eBook:  11 Steps to Living a Strategic Life

We are both honored and thrilled and to celebrate, a copy of our eBook, 11 Steps to Living a Strategic Life: A Guide to Survival During Uncertain Times will be available on Amazon for free between April 5 and April 9.

What is this book about?  Strategic Living, of course.

Here is a section from the interview. (Click here to hear the whole thing.)

Question: Could you paste in a paragraph from your book that gives a good feel for what readers will experience?

Answer Gaye:

“Living strategically – by our own definition – means living a life full of abundant adventure while embracing the tenets of simplicity and sustainability. It means being healthy and reaping the benefits of bounteous friendships and caring relationships.

It means living a life full of happiness and readiness, without the burden of wanting to be someone else or someplace else. It means liking yourself and moving forward with this business of life with animated spirit and optimism.

This all sounds like lofty stuff but when you get right down to it, we think we have been preparing for this moment for a long long time. Living strategically means being self-sufficient and being self-reliant. It means being prepared for life in these uncertain times.”

Answer George:

“The only real “business equation” you need ever learn is that if you spend less than you make, you will always be well off. It seems almost childish to say this, but if you can pay cash for anything it is a good idea to do so. There are plenty of reasons why:

1. If you pay cash, your ownership in generally unencumbered. This means that you own something outright and no one can take it away from you without breaking the law. One exception here is that the government can seize property for nonpayment of taxes.

2. If you pay cash, you don’t pay interest charges. Even though real estate loans are at record low levels of interest, there are still credit card outfits which gouge people for 21% and higher at a time when they are borrowing at the Fed discount window for less than 1%. Oh, sure, they whine about nonpayment’s, charge-off rates and other items, but in the end they’re gouging. You don’t have to contribute to their greed and that’s the power paying cash offers.

3. You don’t have to work. We can’t count the number of people we’ve run into who have to work or face bankruptcy, and some multiple times! If you don’t have cash — and can get even a small home with modest utilities and taxes and save something up to provide a few years of cushion, you can take off work for extended periods of time. You stop being a wage slave.”

Sound interesting?  Here is the link to get our eBook for free between April 5-9.

Speaking of Strategic Living – Subscribe Now

At the beginning of the year, I did a gentle roll out of my new Strategic Living website.  There is not much content and the site is still a bit rough around the edges but I expect things to pick up in earnest early this summer.

Want to be the first to learn about new articles being posted to the site?

Subscribe to Strategic Living

I also have a Facebook page where I will be continuing the tradition of posting free eBooks.  The difference is that the Strategic Living FB page will focus more on DIY, Cooking, Essential Oils, and, topics to related to living and being awesome.

The Final Word

I am keeping this brief because I need to get back to unpacking and organizing my preps.  When I can once again see the forest through the trees, I promise to share what moving is like, prepper-style!

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!


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Source: Alternative news journal

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20 Strategies and Tips for Creating a Rainwater Catchment System

20 Strategies and Tips for Creating a Rainwater Catchment System | rain-water | PreparednessSurvival

Living in the desert has taught me not to take water for granted.  Unlike the Pacific Northwest, I am not footsteps away from streams, ponds, or a vast sea just waiting for me to collect and purify for personal use.

In a continuing effort to educate our readers on the finer aspects of self-sufficiency, I have invited Dan Chiras to share his best strategies and tips for creating a rain catchment system that works.

If Dan’s name sounds familiar, it is because he is the author of two Prepper Book Festival titles, Survive in Style: The Prepper’s Guide to Living Comfortably through Disasters and Power From the Sun: A Practical Guide to Solar Electricity.  Today he is here with specifics on collecting rainwater, regardless of where you live.

Let it Rain: Collecting Rainwater from Your Roof to Survive in Style

In a crisis, rainwater can become one of a prepper’s greatest allies. If you live in an area with as few as 30 inches (12 cm) of precipitation a year, you may be able to live entirely off water falling on the roof of your home. That is, you could collect enough water from precipitation to meet all of your needs for cooking, cleaning, bathing, flushing toilets, watering gardens, and supplying a few chickens and a goat or cow – if you use water efficiently. I’ve done it for many years.

In drier climates, you may not be able to live off rainwater, but you could capture enough water to irrigate a vegetable garden and fruit trees and perhaps supply a few animals that provide the food you’ll need to survive in style.

Rainwater catchment systems are about as simple as they come. All you’ll need is a roof, gutters and downspouts, several rain barrels or a large tank (cistern), and water filters and purifiers. Chances are you are already well on their way to having a successful rainwater catchment system.

If your house is equipped with gutters and downspouts and you’ve got a water filter like an MSR Miniworks EX Microfilter and water purification device like a SteriPen, all you’ll need to do is to add a few rain barrels or a cistern connected to several downspouts to start collecting rain water right now.

I lived off-grid for 14 years in Colorado in the Foothills of the Rockies and supplied all of my family’s water with a rainwater catchment system during that time, although we used water very efficiently. I was constantly amazed by the amount of water we were able to collect off our roof. You will, too.

20 Strategies and Tips for Creating a Rainwater Catchment System | 2500-gallon-plastic-tank | PreparednessSurvival

This 2500 gallon plastic tank was installed to catch rainwater off our roof.

How Much Rainwater Can I Collect?

To estimate the amount of rainwater you can capture from a rooftop, simply multiply the square footage of your home by the amount of precipitation in inches by 0.55. (IF your home is two stories, divide the total square footage by the number of stories.)

A 2,000 square foot (190 square meter) home in the Midwest in an area that experiences 30 inches of annual precipitation could capture 33,000 gallons (125,000 liters) of water per year. That’s about 90 gallons (230 liters) of water per day.

In most conventional homes, that’s only enough water for one person. If used judiciously, however, that 90 gallons (230 liters) per day could meet all of your and your family’s needs. (Judiciously is another way of saying you will need to use water very efficiently.)

How to Create a Water Catchment System from Rainwater

Here are some tips to create a successful rainwater catchment system.

1.  Check with local authorities to be sure that rainwater catchment systems are legal in your state.

Some western states like Colorado prohibit rainwater collection, although I’ve known a few rebellious individuals who have installed them anyway, flying successfully under the radar. I can’t recommend that strategy, for legal reasons, but doubt anyone’s going to care if they’re capturing rainwater to survive. Even in “normal” times, illegal rainwater catchment is not a high-priority crime.

2.  Remember, you can collect rainwater off your home, but also off roofs of other buildings such as garages, carports, sheds, and chicken coops.

Doing so will greatly increase your supply of water.

3.  The cleaner the roof the better. Metal and tile roofs produce cleaner water than asphalt shingle roofs.

The cleaner the water, the less filtering and purification you’ll need to render the water drinkable. Bear in mind, however, if you’re going to simply use rainwater to irrigate gardens, fruit trees, and berry patches or supply a few chickens and a cow or goat, the water won’t need to be as clean up front.

4.   If your home is surrounded by deciduous trees, install leaf guards on your gutters.

At the very least, install a leaf screen on your downspout. Leaves clog up gutters, but more important, decaying leaves in gutters produce organic compounds that contaminate water supplies. They probably won’t kill you, but they may turn the water brown.

5.  For best results, install a roof washer.

This is a rather simple device that diverts a small amount of water initially flowing off a roof during a rainstorm away from your cistern or rain barrel. This, in turn, prevents dirt and bird droppings, if any, from contaminating your drinking water supply. (See the website I cited below to learn more about roof washers.)

6.  If you live in a warm climate, rain barrels and cisterns can be installed above ground.

Be sure to install tanks with opaque walls (not clear or translucent). If possible, install them in shady locations to keep the water cooler and protect the tank from UV radiation. Tanks with transparent or translucent walls allow sunlight to penetrate. Sunlight, in turn, supports algae that will contaminate your water.

7.  If you live in a colder climate and want to collect water from snow melting off your roof, be sure to bury your cistern below the frost line or place it indoors – for example, in a basement.

Only bury water tanks rated for underground burial.

8.  If you are planning on drinking water from your system, it’s a good idea to install a tank rated for potable water, although a high-quality filter that removes organic chemicals may be all you need.

If you are going to be using the water for cleaning, watering plants, and supplying animals, a clean plastic tank will generally suffice.

9. If you purchase used tanks, be sure they have never been used to store toxic chemicals such as herbicides or insecticides or natural oils like Vitamin E.

The latter are very difficult to clean initially.

10. Rainwater can be emptied directly into open barrels from gutters cut off just above the rain barrel or can be filled by rainwater diverters that are installed in gutters.

20 Strategies and Tips for Creating a Rainwater Catchment System | simple-two-tub-system-collects-rainwater | PreparednessSurvival

It ain’t pretty but this simple two-tub system collects rainwater off one of our outbuildings to help water our cattle.

11.  Be sure to place a fine-mesh screen over open rain barrels to keep mosquitos and other critters out.

They’ll lay eggs in standing water. Mosquitos are also potential carriers of some microorganisms that result in fatal diseases such as malaria, in tropical and semitropical climates. They’re also known to spread the West Nile virus in temperate climates. Lest we forget, they’re also a nuisance for those who like to sit outdoors at night. A screened top will also prevent birds and mice from gaining access and drowning, then rotting, in your water supply.

12. Place rain barrels on cement blocks and install a spigot so you can easily remove water from the tank with a garden hose or bucket.

20 Strategies and Tips for Creating a Rainwater Catchment System | Rain-barrel-with-spigot-e1491005696397 | PreparednessSurvival

You definitely will want to install a spigot on your rain barrel.

13.  Remember, two or more rain barrels can be daisy chained (plumbed) together to increase the amount of water you collect.

14.  If you install an underground cistern or an aboveground barrel or tank, be sure to equip it with an overflow – a safe outlet that will carry excess water away from the tank should it top off in a rainstorm.

Be sure the drains at least six to 10 feet away from your foundation.

15.  If you draw water out of a cistern with an electric pump, be sure the inlet to the pump is six inches or so off the bottom of the tank so it won’t suck up any sediment.

16.  Drain rain barrels and cisterns every year or two and clean them to remove sediment or organic residues that may have collected on the bottom of the tank or organic matter such as algae attached to the walls.

17.  Purify water intended for human consumption – for example, water in which you cook food or water you drink.

Because rainwater collected off most roofs tends to be pretty clear (free of sediment or suspended solids), you may not need to filter it or it’ll require very little filtering. Do purify all potable water to eliminate potential parasites and microbes.

18. After you have set up your rainwater catchment system, have the water tested for a wide range of contaminants, especially if you live in or near a polluted city.

19.  Purchase filters and purifiers, then try them out.

Have the water tested again to determine how clean the water is.

20.  Start learning many ways to use water more efficiently.

You can learn about them in my new book, Survive in Style: How to Live Comfortably through Disasters.

Additional Resources

To learn more about roof washers and system design visit http://extension.psu.edu/natural-resources/water/drinking-water/cisterns-and-springs/rainwater-cisterns-design-construction-and-water-treatment.

To obtain information on cisterns for personal water collection visit http://www.rainharvest.com/rain-harvesting.html.

The Final Word

Rainwater catchment systems are perfect for those who want to stay put or for those who have a safe place to escape to in times of crisis but lack a water supply. Although you may have to use water very efficiently, for instance, by taking shorter and less frequent showers, you’ll be much better off if a short-term disaster morphs into a year-long nightmare than those who have simply stockpiled water. You can even use a rainwater catchment system in times of relative calm to reduce your dependence on well water or municipal water supplies.

Get going now and set up a system as soon as you can. This will give you time to learn how much water you can collect and how the system works. It will also give you time to work out any bugs. You’ll never regret this decision.

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!


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The post 20 Strategies and Tips for Creating a Rainwater Catchment System appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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How To Prepare For An Earthquake

How To Prepare For An Earthquake | Quake | PreparednessSurvival

The post How To Prepare For An Earthquake appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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10 Basic Household Items to Use in a Survival Situation

10 Basic Household Items to Use in a Survival Situation | dental-floss-1024x682 | PreparednessSurvival

No matter how prepared you are, survival is really about making the most of what you have on hand. Did you know there are many items sitting around your house that can protect you, no matter what kind of catastrophe strikes?

If this list is any indication, women may be the ones to stick closest to since they have some of the most useful items. If you aren’t one, hopefully, you will know one since they likely will have the best multi-purpose goods when the SHTF.

Household Items To Use When Disaster Strikes

No matter what you have in your storehouse, supplies can run out or you may not have prepared for every eventuality. If you are in a pinch, here are some household items that can mean the difference between life and death in a survival situation.

1.  Tampons and Pads

These two have a variety of uses. Pads are obviously an excellent way to staunch blood if someone suffers a serious wound, but they are also a great way to filter water. Tampons can do a lot of the same work. They can be used to filter water when they are fluffed out, and the string makes an excellent wick. They can both be used for tinder as well.

2.  Dried Kitchen Sponges

These sponges — like those you get at William-Sonoma — were the inspiration for U.S. Military’s tool, XStat, which works similar to a fix-a-flat. Its purpose was to stop gunshot and shrapnel wounds from bleeding out. Since XStat isn’t lying around the house, those super-compressed sponges can be used to do the same thing, though it may take a little finesse without the syringe.

3.  Bras

Snip a bra down the middle front and you have two fairly reasonable particulate filters that can be used as facemasks. You can even use the straps to tie it around the face for hand-free use. Underwire could also come in handy when metal becomes a need, the elastic straps make useful slings and, if the bras are padded, the padding can be used for tinder.

4.  Air Compressor

Air compressors will be great to have on hand in a survival situation for many reasons. Perhaps one of the most crucial is for skinning meat after a kill. Cut a small hole in the thigh of a deer you have killed and hung, insert the air compressor nozzle, and voila, the skin becomes detached from the meat.

5.  Canned Tuna

No matter the situation, wasting food isn’t a good idea. Some foods, however, are packaged in such a way that also makes them good for survival. Not much can beat canned tuna when the SHTF since it can be used as a food source and an oil lamp.

Make sure it’s oil-packed tuna, then stab a hole in the top. Use the tampon string or some newspaper as a wick and shove it into the hole, leaving about a ½” exposed. Give the oil time to soak to the wick, then light it. A can of oil-packed tuna will burn for about two hours, and the fish is still good for eating after.

6.  Chapstick

Chapstick can be used to protect lips, faces and hands against the elements in a survival situation, but it may be more important as a candle. Use wire from a bra to work the tampon-wick into the top of the chapstick. Light it up, and continue to push the chapstick up to keep the tube from melting. It should work as a candle for about two hours. Lip balm in a can works well for this, too.

7.  Alcohol

Because it can increase dehydration, most preppers don’t think to stockpile alcohol, but it can mean the difference between life and death in some situations. It’s a disinfectant, so it can be used to treat wounds and calm the injured person down. Among other uses, it can:

  • Clean a gun
  • Cook an egg
  • Kill bacteria and mold
  • Start a fire

8.  Dental Floss

More than for your mouth’s hygiene, dental floss has an unending list of uses.  It can suture a wound, seal pipes, kill a chicken, be used as a fishing line and to fix broken eyeglasses. In any situation where you might need string it can be handy, but its portability and strength make it effective beyond even that.

9.  Coffee Filters and Coffee Grounds

Prepping sometimes involves taking what no longer has traditional use and using it for survival. Coffee filters can filter water and be used as tinder, but coffee grounds are just as important. Coffee grounds can melt ice, repel pests and be used as fertilizer.

10.  Pantyhose

You can now stop throwing away pantyhose after you get a run. Add them to your stockpile because they have myriad uses. They can be used to carry things, prevent blisters, as mosquito netting, to filter water and to sprout seeds.

The Final Word

Alongside the traditional items to stockpile like salt, water, and canned goods, consider keeping a few of these items on hand. What may seem like common items that get you through your day can also help you survive a crisis. The key to survival is thinking ahead, so look beyond the prescribed use of everyday items in your home and prepare today for anything that could happen tomorrow.

Author Bio: Bobbi Peterson loves writing and regularly posts on her blog Living Life Green. She’s also a freelance writer, green living advocate and environmentalist. You can find more from Bobbi on Twitter.

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!


Subscribe to The Sleuth Journal Newsletter for Daily Articles!


The post 10 Basic Household Items to Use in a Survival Situation appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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