Prepping In Real Life: It is Never Too Late to Change Course

Prepping In Real Life: It is Never Too Late to Change Course | escape-from-fishy-life-background-700x438 | PreparednessSurvival

There is no other way to begin this article than to simply begin.

Back in the day, meaning 2011 and 2012, survivalist preppers were a curiosity. Those of us that chose this journey ended up soldiering their way through a maze of trial and error, amassing supplies and traditional skills that would carry us through the next apocalypse.

Early on, I chose to refer to the next apocalypse as a “disruptive event” and the label stuck.  Whether a natural disaster, economic collapse, or manmade event, it was always my feeling that a broad foundation of self-sufficiency would carry us through the worst of times.

And so it has been for all these years.

Do you ever feel like a fish out of water? If so, you are not alone.

Unfortunately, so many years later, I find that prepping has become an industry filled with bad information, shoddy ethics, and fraud.  I am saddened by all of this, so much so that there are days I want to give it up lest I am caught up in a cycle where raw capitalism supersedes common sense education.

But I digress.

In this newest Backdoor Survival think piece, I would like to challenge you to take a look at yourself and your needs and judge yourself by your own standards and not those of someone else.  I ask you to walk the walk and stay true to your core belief system so that you can become as prepared as you need to be.  No more, and no less.

To help you along, I am including an excerpt from Dan Chiras’ book, Things I Learned Too Late In Life: It’s Never Too Late To Be Who You Might Have Been.  It has helped me a lot, and I hope it helps you, too.

It’s Never too Late to Be Who You Might Have Been

Most of us live two lives: a secret inner life decorated with high ideals and moral principles, and an outer real life in which we often abandon or compromise our morals and ideals, sometimes our most cherished ideals, for the sake of expediency, fitting in, getting by, or hundreds of other flimsy excuses.

In essence, each of us is a complex mixture of who we are and who we’d like to be. No wonder that we’re each a conflicting maze of emotions and ideas and actions.

At a keynote address at a conference at the University of Colorado in the 1990s, a prominent health-food advocate told her audience, “Don’t judge me by my cupboards.” She went on to explain that her children insisted on her buying all kinds of less-than-healthy goodies – cereals loaded with food dyes and, of course, dripping with sugar. All these products violated her beliefs – and teachings — about sound nutrition.

I fully understand and sympathize with her and don’t stand in judgment. All parents know how difficult it is to get our children to eat right. I offer this anecdote, however, as an example of one of many often powerful forces that steer us off the path of being – or becoming — who we really want to be – in this case, our children’s unrelenting and plaintive whining.

This speaker’s proclamation was just one example of how we all live lives nagged by many niggling little white lies – believing in one thing, acting in ways that contradict our beliefs.

Bottom line, however, when all is said and done, we have to judge ourselves by what’s in our cupboards, not by the slogans on the bumper stickers on our cars or the T shirts we wear on weekends.

What we do is who we are. We are not what we believe in but fail to do or be.

The Final Word

When it comes to prepping, talk is cheap. It is the doing that is expensive.  As I learned from Dan’s book, “walking your talk” takes time, energy, money, and commitment.

My wish for all of you is that you continue to walk your talk. Do it your way.  And when in doubt, ask a lot of questions.  If something smells wrong, most likely it is wrong. Go with your gut instincts, instead.

Prepping, and being a survivalist prepper, is hard work so define your needs, and go from there.  Be true to yourself and your moral compass and you can not and will not go astray.

And that, as I like to say, is all I am going to say about that.

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!


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Patient Advocacy For Good Times and Bad

Patient Advocacy For Good Times and Bad | holding-hands | General Health Medical & Health PreparednessSurvival

Becoming medically prepared can be one of the most difficult aspects of prepping.  First, there is the unpredictable nature of medical emergencies themselves.  Then there is the prospect of inadequate medical training coupled with the lack of supplies and medicine.

Even during normal times, doing the right thing medically can have dire consequences.  Something you may not have considered is the need for patient advocacy, both now and in the future when the prospect of getting good proper medical care is not likely.

Dr. Joe Alton is back again with an all-new and all-important article of medical preparedness.

Advocating for the Patient in Good or Bad Times

We spend a lot of time talking about medical issues in natural and man-made disasters. However, a calamity can also be very personal, such as when you or a loved one suffers a major medical emergency, whether in good or bad times.

In many instances, it is easy for someone like this to “fall through the cracks” of a huge medical establishment. I know this happens, as I saw the results of it as a resident in a large inner-city hospital. The lack of having an advocate, for example, in an epidemic setting can be very hazardous to your health.

A similar scenario that could have been fatal also happened to one of our sons, Daniel. Daniel is a 32-year-old who has had severe diabetes since he was nine years old. Due to his disease, he had developed kidney failure, partial blindness, circulatory problems, and had been on dialysis for more than a year. He had been on a transplant waiting list as well.

After a number of false alarms, a kidney and pancreas became available as a result of a drunk driver taking the life of a young father of two as he was riding his bicycle. Daniel underwent transplant surgery at a large city hospital, one of the few in the state that performed this type of procedure.

The good news is that the new organs functioned well from the very start, producing urine and lowering his blood sugars to almost normal levels within 24 hours. Several days after the operation, he was deemed fit enough to leave the Intensive Care Unit and go to a regular floor. This meant that, instead of having a nurse specifically for him, he shared a nurse with several other patients. This is standard operating procedure and usually, has no ominous implications.

However, when we went to see him the day of his transfer, he wasn’t looking well. He seemed pale and his abdomen seemed more distended that it did before. There was a drain coming out of his belly, and it was full of bright red blood.

As a surgeon, seeing a drain with some bloody fluid isn’t that unusual. But the sheer volume of blood draining out of his abdomen was concerning. Nurse Amy and I took it upon ourselves to check Daniel’s vital signs earlier than scheduled and found him to have a racing pulse and a dropping blood pressure. As we were unable to find medical staff, we emptied the bloody drain and watched it rapidly fill up again (and again) in short order. It was clear that he was bleeding internally.

This occurred in the wee hours of the morning after most visitors had left. Staffing was light, and it took some time to find his nurse, who was attending another patient. Our hackles were raised, and we’re not ashamed to admit that we raised a racket. An overworked resident came in to take a look at him. To her credit, she realized that something was wrong, and he returned to the operating room. They wound up removing 3 or 4 liters of free blood from his abdomen before the hemorrhage came under control.

Daniel recovered from this ordeal and, thankfully, his transplanted kidney and pancreas are still functioning. However, thinking about this episode, it was clear to us that it could have ended very badly. If not identified in time, it’s very likely that we would have received a call in the morning notifying us that Daniel had passed away during the night.

We tell you this story not to gain sympathy or a pat on the back, but to convince you of the importance of being a patient advocate. Our advice is not just for family members. If you are working to become a better medical asset to your people in hard times, then you must take patient advocacy as serious as learning first aid. You must walk a mile in the shoes of your patient.

You may already see yourself as an advocate for your patient. Indeed, most doctors today feel they know what’s best for their patients. I certainly hope it is this that guides them; that they would do for their patients as they would for a member of their family. As a medic in a disaster, however, you may be overworked and under stress.

This may make it difficult for you to see things from your patient’s perspective. Your patient may “fall through the cracks” if you’re not careful, simply due to the amount of pressure on you to care for a large survival community.

Consider appointing a family member or other individual to follow a sick patient with you, not necessarily to provide care but to provide support as an advocate. Allow your patient to participate in medical decisions regarding their health and never resent their questions. If they are too weak to do so, communicate your plan of action with their appointed advocate.

Three A’s of Patient Advocacy

Here are Alton’s Three A’s of Advocacy

1)   Accept the importance of a patient’s right to be informed and, if possible, participate in medical decision-making.

2)   Advise the patient so that they understand the medical issue in question and can be a full partner in the therapeutic process.

3)   Allow an advocate to be an intermediary if the patient is too weak to actively participate in their care.

Hard realities may make it difficult to provide quality, informed care in times of trouble. Unfortunately, medic, that is your duty; it’s a responsibility that’s as imperative in bad times as it is in good.

The Final Word

It is not difficult to imagine a time or a place when medical help may not be readily available.  The scenarios are many.  Following a catastrophic natural or manmade disaster, during a pandemic, or even a during a vacation to a remote location.  In each of these cases, you may have to take patient care under your own wing and do the best you can to ensure a good outcome.

In those circumstances, do the best you can, keeping in mind the Alton’s three A’s: Accept, Advice, and Allow.  As a matter of fact, start practicing them now.  They could be a game-changer.

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!


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The Prepared Home: 50 Essential Items to Put in Your Ultimate Survival Medical Kit

The Prepared Home: 50 Essential Items to Put in Your Ultimate Survival Medical Kit | Medical-Supplies | Medical & Health PreparednessSurvival

Would you have the supplies you needed to stop a severe bleed? Do you know what household items you could use if someone was suffering from dehydration? What will you do if someone in the home has shortness of breath?

Short-term disasters can bring on a myriad of medical situations and they can occur very quickly. Because of the disaster, roads may be impassable, or in some cases, the hospitals may be at capacity and cannot take in any more patients. With that in mind, it is important to know what the most common medical emergencies are and prepare accordingly for them. In 2006, The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) released a 2006 Emergency Department Summary that gathered statistics of emergency department use, including the most common reasons adults and children sought medical care and treatment. Having medical supplies that could assist in these common medical emergencies would be proactive on your part.

    •  Children fever
    • Childhood earache
    • Various injuries such as sprains, strains, broken bones
    • Chest pain
    • Abdominal pain
    • Back pain
    • Shortness of breath

In short-term disasters, prepare for water-related illnesses. This will be very common given the close proximity to contaminated water sources. In The Prepper’s Blueprint, it states, “The relationship between communicable diseases and disasters exist and merits special attention. When there is a short-term emergency, there is an increased number of hospital visits and admissions from common diarrhea-related  diseases, acute respiratory infections, dermatitis, and other causes. These type of medical issues are due to those coming in direct contact with flood waters contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage. These contamination factors will cause irritation to skin and a host of other medical conditions.”

In longer-term disasters, burns, cuts, rashes and secondary infections will also be very common medical emergencies to prepare for. Folks, these are the disasters you will likely face and it is imperative that you prepare for this with proper medical supplies and knowledge.

I realize that there are a lot of medical conditions to think about. The best approach is to look at the basics and prepare for those. Many medical items can be used for multiple disasters, so take comfort in this and prepare accordingly.

Build the Ultimate 1 Year Medical Supply with These First Aid Basics

Experts suggest that each home have a basic medical supply that is unique to your family’s needs. Therefore, keep any preexisting conditions and allergies any family members may have, as well as the above list of the most common medical conditions that hospitals see. It is within your best interest to ensure that you have any and all necessary medications that require prescriptions before an emergency happens.We all have our fair share of band-aids and antibiotic ointment, but do you have medical supplies that can help with true medical emergencies? The following list is your basic medical preparations broken into sections of need to help in your organization.


Hygiene

  • Liquid antibacterial hand soap – 20
  • Disposable hand wipes – 20
  • Antibacterial hand sanitizer – 20
  • Feminine items – 12 packages
  • Extra baby needs (diapers, wipes, pacifiers, bottles, medicine, etc.) – in quantity
  • Exam gloves – 5 boxes

Essential Medical Tools

  • Trauma shears
  • Pen light or small flash light
  • Scalpel with extra blades
  • Stethoscope
  • Irrigation syringe
  • Tweezers
  • Thermometer
  • Foam splint – 2 per family member
  • Thermometer

Over-the-Counter Products

  • Aspirin or non-aspirin pain reliever (for adults and children) – 5 bottles
  • Stool softener – 5 bottles
  • Electrolyte powder – 3 boxes
  • Cold/flu medications – 2 boxes per family member
  • Expectorant/decongestants – 3 per family member
  • Hydrocortisone – 3
  • Miconazole/anti-fungal – 3
  • Syrup of Ipecac and activated charcoal – 2
  • Eye care (e.g., contact lens case, cleansing solution, eye moisture drops) – 3 per family member

Natural Supplements

Wound Care

  • Disinfectant (Betadine, isopropyl alcohol, iodine, hydrogen peroxide, etc.) – 2 per family member
  • Band-aids – 3 large boxes in assorted sizes
  • Antibiotic ointment – 5
  • Instant cold and hot packs – 10
  • 1 week of prescription medications – as many as you are able to get with your prescription
  • Ace bandages – 10
  • Non- stick gauze pads in assorted sizes (3×3 and 4×4) – 10 boxes
  • Sterile roller bandages – 5
  • Surgical sponges – 5
  • Adhesive tape or duct tape – 5
  • Steri-strips – 5
  • Moleskin – 3
  • Respirator masks – 4
  • CPR microshield – 1 per family member
  • Suture kit – 3 per family member
  • QuikClot® compression bandages – 2 per family member
  • Tourniquet – 2
  • Thermal Mylar blanket – 1 per family member
  • Antibiotics

*These are your minimum quantities. If you are able to do so, prepare for more.


Customize Your Supplies

Many believe that a basic store-bought medical kit will provide for all of  their medical needs, but these kits tend to be overloaded with unneeded items (i.e., 500 band aids). Buying your own medical supplies allows you to customize your kit to fit your family’s unique needs and is more economical. In fact, you can purchase many of these items at your local Dollar Store to save money.  Customizing your family’s medical supply gives your family members the best chance at being cared for when a medical emergency arises. Further, take your preparedness a step further and organize your medical preps and create medical response packs for quick acting.

Storing Medical Supplies

How you store your first aid supplies is every bit as important as having the supplies in the first place.

Medicines can lose potency or spoil if they are subject to moisture, temperature fluctuations, and light.  For example, aspirin begins to break down when it is exposed to a slight amount of moisture.

Unless the instructions indicate otherwise, store medications in a cool, dark place that is out of the reach of children.   However, you still want to store the medical supplies in a place that is easily accessible to adults, who may need to respond very quickly in the event of a medical crisis.

Check expiration dates periodically to ensure the medicines are still good to use.  While most medicines lose potency once they’re past the expiration date, there are a few that will actually make a person extremely ill if taken after it spoils.  For example, tetracycline antibiotics that have spoiled can cause a severe, sometimes deadly, kidney ailment.

Signs of Expired Medicines

Although there is data that states most medicines can last longer than their expiration dates, it is important to understand that using medicine years past its expiration date can lose effectiveness and in some cases, change its chemical makeup. If you are in a survival situation where your life depended on an outdated drug, then it is wise to follow the cliché “better safe than sorry”.

Knowing the signs of expired medicine can help indicate when new items are needed.

  • Creams or ointments which are discolored or have changed in texture.
  • Creams or ointments which have cracked or separated.
  • The medicines smell has changed since it was opened.
  • Tablets are broken or chipped and have changed color.

Source – www.generalmedicine.suite101.com

Bear in mind, there are some medications that should never be used after their expiration and could have severe consequences for patients. These include:

  • Anticonvulsants – narrow therapeutic index
  • Dilantin, phenobarbital – very quickly lose potency
  • Nitroglycerin – very quickly lose potency
  • Warfarin – narrow therapeutic index
  • Procan SR – sustained release procainamide
  • Theophylline – very quickly lose potency
  • Digoxin – narrow therapeutic index
  • Thyroid preparations
  • Paraldehyde
  • Oral contraceptives
  • Epinephrine – very quickly lose potency
  • Insulin – very quickly lose potency
  • Eye drops – eyes are particularly sensitive to any bacteria that might grow in a solution once a preservative degrades.

Source

Don’t limit first aid supplies to your home

Store a first aid kit in the car (being careful with heat sensitive items) and also tuck some medical supplies into your 72-hour bag. This way, you can be ready to deal with medical emergencies wherever they happen to occur.

To conclude, there will always be the threat of completely unanticipated disasters, but your overall preparedness should enable you to effectively deal with those situations when they arise. This year supply of first aid items will enable you to prepare for medical emergencies when the hospitals aren’t an option.


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The post The Prepared Home: 50 Essential Items to Put in Your Ultimate Survival Medical Kit appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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Best Practices For Dealing With Wounds In A Survival Situation

wound care

Depending upon who you talk to, a severe wound or lasceration should always be sutured close.  Or should it?

When faced with an austere survival situation, the decision you make to close an open wound could spell the difference between proper healing and an infected mess.  Personally, I vote for proper healing but getting to the correct decision when under pressure may not be easy.

Help is on the way.

Dr. Joe Alton, known to those of us in the survival community as Dr. Bones, is launching the first of a series of exclusive articles for Backdoor Survival readers in this article, “To Close or Not to Close”.  This article began life as a question from a reader, making it particularly relevant.

To Close or Not to Close (A Wound)

By Joe Alton, MD

When a laceration occurs, our body’s natural armor is breached and bacteria, even species that are normal inhabitants of our skin, get a free ticket into the rest of our body. Microbes that are harmless outside the body could be life-threatening inside the body.

It only makes common sense that we want to close a cut (also known as a “laceration”) to speed healing and lock out infection. There is controversy, however, as to whether or not a wound should be closed. When and why would you choose to close a wound, and what method should you use?

A laceration may be closed either by sutures, tapes, staples or medical “superglues” such as Derma-Bond or even industrial “Super-Glue”. After rendering first aid, which includes controlling the bleeding, removing any debris, irrigation the wound, and applying antiseptic, you will have to make a decision.

What are you trying to accomplish by closing a wound? Your goals are simple. You close wounds to repair the defect in your body’s armor, to eliminate “dead space”, and to promote healing. A well-approximated wound also has less scarring.

It sounds as if all wounds should be closed. Unfortunately, closing a wound that should be left open can do a lot more harm than good, and could possibly put your patient’s life at risk. Take the case of a young woman injured some years ago in a “zip line” accident: She was taken to the local emergency room, where 22 staples were needed to close a large laceration. Unfortunately, the wound had dangerous bacteria in it, causing a serious infection which spread throughout her body. She eventually required multiple amputations.

We learn from this an important lesson: Namely, that the decision to close a wound is not automatic but involves several considerations. The most important consideration is whether you are dealing with a clean or a dirty wound.

Most wounds you will encounter in an off-grid setting will be dirty. If you try to close a dirty wound, such as a gunshot, you have sequestered bacteria, bits of clothing, and dirt into your body. Within a short period of time, the wound will become infected. An infected wound appears red, swollen, and hot. In extreme cases, an abscess may form, and pus will accumulate inside. The infection may spread to the bloodstream, a condition known as “septicemia”, and become life-threatening.

It may be difficult to fight the urge to close a wound. Leaving the wound open, however, will allow you to clean the inside frequently and directly observe the healing process. It also allows inflammatory fluid to drain out of the body. The scar isn’t as pretty, but it’s the safest option in most cases. In addition, if you’re truly in a long-term survival scenario, the suture material or staples you have aren’t going to be replaced. It’s important to know when closure is absolutely necessary and when it’s not.

Other considerations when deciding whether or not to close a wound are whether it is a simple laceration (straight thin cut on the skin) or whether it is an avulsion (areas of skin torn out or hanging flaps). If the edges of the skin are so far apart that they cannot be stitched together without undue pressure, the wound should be left open.

Another reason the wound should be left open if it has been open for more than 8 hours. Why? Even the air has bacteria, and there’s a good chance that they have already colonized the injury by that time.

Let’s say that you’re certain the wound is clean. It’s less than 8 hours old. Here are some other factors that would suggest that closure is appropriate:

• The laceration is long or deep. The exception would be a puncture wound from an animal bite. These bites are loaded with bacteria and should be kept open in austere settings.

• The wound is located over a joint. A moving part, such as the knee, will constantly stress a wound and prevent it from closing in by itself.

• The wound gapes open loosely, suggesting that it can be closed without undue pressure on the skin.

t’s important to realize that you will only have a limited supply of staples and sutures. Feel free to mix different closure methods like alternating sutures and steri-strips, or even adding duct tape when you’ve run out of medical supplies. You’d be surprised what qualifies as medical supplies when the chips are down.

If you are unsure, you can choose to wait 48 to 72 hours before closing a wound to make sure that no signs of infection develop. This is referred to as “delayed closure”. Some wounds can be partially closed, allowing a small open space to avoid the accumulation of inflammatory fluid.

Drains, consisting of thin lengths of latex, nitrile, or even gauze, might be placed into the wound for this purpose. “Penrose” drains are a version of these that are still used in some operating rooms. Drains have a tendency to leak, so place a dressing over the exposed area

Many injuries that require closure (and some that don’t) also should be treated with antibiotics in oral or topical form to decrease the chance of infection. Natural substances with antibiotic properties, such as garlic or raw, unprocessed honey, may be useful in survival scenarios.

More on antibiotic use in future articles.

Read  more from Joe and Amy Alton at their website at www.doomandbloom.net or in their book, The Survival Medicine Handbook.

The Final Word

I am over the moon thrilled that Joe has agreed to bring exclusive new content to Backdoor Survival readers.  You will begin to see his articles monthly, as I carry out my initiative to present survival and prepping information from some of the best and the most experienced minds available.

Last month I sent Joe and his wife, Nurse Amy, a long list of survival medicine related questions you have been asking.  As with his upcoming article on antibiotic use, you can bet that we will be getting to your requests a bit at a time.

Stay tuned, and, as always, keep your questions coming.

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!

The post Best Practices For Dealing With Wounds In A Survival Situation appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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Which Items Will Disappear First During A Major National Emergency?

End-Times-Ruins-Apocalypse-Public-Domain

One day in the not too distant future, a major emergency will strike this nation, and that will set off a round of hoarding unlike anything we have ever seen before.  Just think about what happens when a big winter storm or a hurricane is about to hit one of our major cities – inevitably store shelves are stripped bare of bread, milk, snow shovels, etc.  Even though winter storms and hurricanes are just temporary hurdles to overcome, they still cause many people to go into panic mode.  So what is going to happen when we have a real crisis on our hands?

We can get some clues about which items will disappear first during a major national emergency by taking a look at where such a scenario is already playing out.  One recent survey found that over 80 percent of all basic foodstuffs are currently unavailable in Venezuela, and about half the country can no longer provide three meals a day for their families.  Thankfully, some stores still have a few things that they are able to offer, but other key items are completely gone.  The following comes from USA Today

Oh, there are some things to buy. Besides salt, there are fresh vegetables and fruits, dairy products but no milk, some cereal, lots of snacks and a few canned goods.

The only meat is sausages; there are three kinds of cheese. The only problem: A kilogram of each costs more than a fourth of our monthly minimum wage of 15,050 bolivars.

But basic foodstuffs – the things most Venezuelans want to eat  such as corn meal, wheat flour, pasta, rice, milk, eggs, sugar, coffee, chicken, mayonnaise, margarine, cooking oil and beef – are conspicuous by their absence. And there is no toilet paper, no sanitary napkins, no disposable baby diapers, no shampoo, no toothpaste, no hand soap and no deodorant.

Do you have plenty of the items in bold above stored up?

If not, you may want to stock up while you still can.

Venezuela was once the wealthiest nation in all of South America, but now lines for food often begin as early as three in the morning.  Some people have become so desperate that they are actually hunting cats, dogs and pigeons for food, and there are even a few very sick people that have been killing and eating zoo animals.

Someday similar things will happen in the United States and Europe too.

When that day arrives, will you be prepared?

One of the things that got my attention from the article quote above was the lack of milk.  My wife is always telling me that we should store up more dried milk, and I believe that she is right.

Just imagine not having any milk and not being able to get any more.

What would you do?

Another thing that really stood out to me in the article was the fact that there is a severe shortage of personal hygiene items.  Most people don’t really think of those as “prepper goods”, but the truth is that life will become very uncomfortable without them very rapidly.

What would you do if there was no more toilet paper?

And if you have a little one, how are you going to manage without any diapers?

In general, it is wise to always have an extra supply of just about everything that you use on a daily basis stored away somewhere in your home.  The generation that went through the Great Depression of the 1930s understood this concept very well, but most of us that are younger have had it so good for so long that we don’t even really grasp what a real crisis looks like.

Another thing that we are seeing happen right now in Venezuela is the rise of a barter economy

Many of my urban friends are now planting vegetables in their outdoor spaces – if they have any – or in pots. Another friend, who is a hairdresser, is charging clients food to do their hair. For a shampoo and dry, she charges a kilo of corn meal, saying that she doesn’t have time to stand in line like some of her clients.

As you prepare for what is ahead, you may want to consider stocking up on some items that would specifically be used for bartering in a crisis situation.

For example, you may not drink coffee, but there are millions upon millions of people that do.  In a crisis situation, there will be many that will be extremely desperate to get their hands on some coffee, and so any coffee that you store away now may become a very valuable asset.

We live in a world where one out of every eight people already goes to bed hungry each night, and where one out of every three children is underweight.  As global weather patterns become more extreme, as natural disasters continue to become more frequent and more intense, and as terror and war continue to spread, it is inevitable that the stress on the global food system is going to continue to grow.

Today you can waltz into Wal-Mart and buy giant cartloads of very inexpensive food, but it will not always be that way.

Unfortunately, more than half the country is currently living paycheck to paycheck, and most Americans do not have any emergency food stored up at all.

In addition to food and personal hygiene supplies, here are some other items that are likely to disappear very rapidly during a major national emergency…

-Flashlights

-Batteries

-Generators

-Propane

-Can Openers

-Water Filters

-Water Containers

-Anything Related To Self-Defense

-Axes

-Knives

-Sleeping Bags

-Tents

-First Aid Kits

-Matches

-Candles

-Firewood

-Shovels

-Bottled Water

-Warm Clothing

-Lanterns

-Portable Radios

So in addition to food and personal hygiene items, you may want to do an inventory of the items that I have listed above and see where you may have some holes in your preparation plans.

I understand that there will be some people that will read this article and think that all of us “preppers” are being just a tad ridiculous.

But when a major emergency strikes this nation and you haven’t done anything to prepare, you will dearly wish that you had bothered to take action while there was still time remaining to do so.

The post Which Items Will Disappear First During A Major National Emergency? appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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Why Is The German Government Telling People To Stockpile Food, Water And Cash?

why-is-germany-telling-people-to-stockpile-food

The government of Germany is advising citizens to get prepped. Increased terror attacks from refugees have put the country on high alert, and a new “Concept for Civil Defense” will be presented on Wednesday.

Generally speaking, the more dependent a citizenry is, the easier they are to control. In my book, The Pantry Primer, I wrote about the history of using food as a weapon of manipulation by governments throughout history. Whenever the government gives up the Nanny stance and tells people that they need to put on their big kid pants and take care of themselves, there’s reason for concern.

This translated report explains that German citizens will be required to take responsibility for themselves with a 10 day supply.

“The population is stopped, hold up a personal supply of food of ten days,” the newspaper quoted from the draft of the concept, which was already known in essential parts in early August. According to the report, the population should be able to protect themselves in an emergency before calling government action to ensure an adequate supply of food, water, energy and cash. Therefore, the population should also be encouraged to reproach for a period of five days for each two liters of drinking water per person per day…

The recommendation for stockpiling to citizens is only one of many elements of the 69-page concept. It reads aloud FAS with reference to the threat assessment of the federal government in the new white paper , “that an attack on the territory of Germany, which requires a conventional defense, play” was. Nevertheless, it was necessary, “nevertheless to such sufficiently prepared not fundamentally excluded for the future development of life-threatening”.

These include a reliable alarm system and sufficient capacity in the health system.

Who can help but point a finger at the immigration crisis?

When German Chancellor Angela Merkel threw open the doors to hordes of Syrian refugees (and by hordes, I mean  over 1.1 million refugees arrived in Germany in 2015), an epidemic of rape and violence against the German people began. Gun ownership in the country has skyrocketed in the wake of the rapes in Cologne on New Years Eve (but don’t worry – it was all just a “game” to the refugees) and Islamic terror attacks that are growing in frequency.

Of course, the LA Times says the concern about Islamic terror attacks in Germany is greatly exaggerated. And in a recent interview,  Merkel refused to take the heat, despite the fact that her own advisors blame the unchecked flood of migrants.

Mrs Merkel seems determined to ignore public opinion about her ‘open door’ policy towards asylum seekers.

At a political meeting on Wednesday in her home state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern ahead of a regional poll next month she was asked if ‘terrorism had come to Germany with the refugees’.

The chancellor, whose approval ratings are dwindling on the back of public fears about increased terror risk, said: ‘The phenomenon of Islamic terrorism of IS not a phenomenon that has come to us through the refugees but one we already had.’

George Soros has blamed Merkel’s immigration policies for causing the chaos in Germany. Ironically, Soros himself was recently outed as being the puppetmaster behind the refugee Trojan horse that has destabilized Europe.

When the warnings start, it’s already too late.

We’ve seen this before.

If you’ve been following collapses around the world for the past few years, you know that right before all heck breaks loose, the government issues a half-hearted warning along the lines of, “You’re on your own now.” But by then, it’s already too late. People who try to prepare after the government tells them to will be dealing with limited supplies as everyone else tries to get prepped too.

It happened in Greece and Venezuela both, and it’s highly possible that we’re about to watch history repeat itself.

Will Germany become the next falling domino in the collapse of the Western world?

The lesson that we can take from this is that being prepared far in advance of a collapse is the wisest course of action. If you stock up on emergency food, water, and other vital supplies before the crowd, you’ll do so at better prices with better options. Last summer, our own government issued 2 warnings to the American people to get prepared, but very few people took it seriously.

Don’t wait until it’s too late.

The post Why Is The German Government Telling People To Stockpile Food, Water And Cash? appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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Over A Thousand Motorists Stranded By The Flood: Are You Prepped For Something Like This?

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As the waters in Louisiana continue to rise, over a thousand motorists stranded by the flood have been stuck on Interstate 12 for more than 24 hours. Southeast Louisiana has been hard-hit before with flooding, and a decade after Hurricane Katrina, people are still trying to rebuild.

Some families were trying to evacuate, as flood waters crept closer to their homes, while others were going about their day-to-day business. The National Guard has dispatched helicopters to drop food, water, and supplies to the folks who are waiting in their cars for rescue.

Being stranded in your vehicle is not as rare as you might think. A few years back, a freak snowstorm in Georgia and Alabama resulted in a gridlock that left motorists heading home from work stranded in their cars overnight. And in an even more dramatic event, one family was stranded in the frigid wilderness for days after an accident, surviving on what they had with them in their Jeep.

There are several preparedness lessons to be learned from this disaster:

  • Your car kit should see you through at least 48 hours.  Do you have enough water and food that doesn’t require cooking to get your family through an event like this? Do you have a way to keep small children entertained? Go here to see what I keep in my car kit. Yes, it’s extensive, but in a situation like this one, we could last for days without waiting for a helicopter to drop supplies to us.
  • Whenever possible, evacuate before things get this bad.  Timing is everything when it comes to an evacuation. If you get out early, you won’t get stuck in traffic and are less likely to encounter insurmountable hazards. (This is an excellent guide to evacuations.) Of course, you can’t always make it out ahead of the crowd, especially in a situation with conditions that strike suddenly, like wildfire (check out the videos here to see how fast it can happen) or flash floods.
  • Keep your gas tank above 3/4 full.  If you get stranded, you may need to run your vehicle for warmth, to keep the cell phone battery charged, and to listen to news updates. You’ll be glad you kept the tank topped up.

If you were stranded in your car, would you have to wait for supplies to be dropped?

None of these steps take a whole lot of money or effort. Go to your pantry right now and choose some supplies to add to your vehicle. It can’t hurt, and it could possibly make a miserable experience a lot less unpleasant.

Hat tip to Ellen!

The post Over A Thousand Motorists Stranded By The Flood: Are You Prepped For Something Like This? appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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Save Money By Raiding The Pantry For Food Preps

canned storage food

There are times when we all need to budget and to carefully watch our food expenditures.  Throughout my own adult life, I have done so on many occasions.  Sometimes it was because I was saving for something special but more often, my personal austerity had to do with the reality of income less expenses resulting in a shortfall.

As a prepper, this can be a dilemma, especially as we try to acquire emergency food and supplies that are going to stand up to the test of time.  For most of us, even during the best of times the process of acquiring large stores of emergency supplies can be daunting, expense wise.  Actually, it is a daunting process period, regardless of the expense.

I find it so much easier to break things down into baby steps, and, from your comments and emails, know that I have had some success in doing so with my 12 Months of Prepping series, which, when written, had beginning preppers in mind.

Baby steps can also be applied to prepping on a budget.  And what is my #1 baby step?  Raiding the pantry for emergency food preps!  When the budget is a wreck, before spending even a dollar on food storage pantry, go on a scavenger hunt and gather food staples and supplies from the kitchen cupboard.

Here is the list of items to look for:

  • Rice
  • Oatmeal
  • Canned or dried beans
  • Canned meats or seafood products (chicken, tuna, sardines)
  • Canned tomatoes
  • Canned soups
  • Unopened jar of peanut butter
  • Chicken broth
  • Powdered beverage mixes
  • Instant coffee and tea bags
  • Condiments: salt, pepper, chili powder
  • Sugar
  • An old fashioned, manual can opener

Something these pantry foods have in common is that they are relatively easy to prepare, nutritious, and except for the canned meats, budget friendly.  They may be boring to eat maybe but then again, our goal is not be become a gourmet cook while we shelter in place.

My best guess is that you will find most if not all of these items in your kitchen pantry.  The next step is to remove them from your kitchen pantry, mark the date with your Sharpie pen, and take them out of circulation.  I recommend that you put them in a spare cupboard, a bin, or even in a large plastic garbage bag. The point is that you want your emergency items set aside for just that, an emergency.  They should be out of sight.

Something else to keep in mind that if at all possible, these items should be kept in a cool, dry place.  In addition, the rice and oatmeal should be sealed in containers that will keep out the insects and critters.  Have an old cookie tin or popcorn tin?  That will work.  If you have a food saver, better yet.  As you become more advanced, you can move on to Mylar bags and buckets but for now, easy baby steps rule.

Jus remember that whatever storage container you choose should be scrupulously clean and dry.

A quick note about condiments:  adding a bit of salt, pepper and spice to your foods will make all the difference in the world when it comes to taste. One easy way to get started with condiments is to make small, foil packets of your favorite spices and include them with your emergency supplies.  Just don’t forget to mark them so that you know what is in each packet.

Nothing I mention here is rocket science. I suppose it is best described as a gentle kick in the bum to get up and do something.

The Final Word

Let us not lose sight of what it is like to prep when you are just getting started.  We were all there at one time or another,  In addition, sometimes we have had to start over because we used our preps to get through a short term crisis.  Or, as I am facing, a long-distance move.  Is it really worth is to move a year’s worth of canned goods?

In closing, let me remind you that prepping is a lifestyle.  And, as with all things in life, circumstances can change.  When that happens, we must adjust, adapt, and start anew by going back to the beginning when we were just getting started.

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!

 

The post Save Money By Raiding The Pantry For Food Preps appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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Are YOU Prepared ? (VIDEO)

Are You Prepared?

If you are reading this, then you are likely in the minority of people who understands what the “mainstream media” and their brethren politicians tell you about the economy, compared with reality, may be “slightly” different from one another. For example, while the government and the evening news reports United States unemployment at 4.9 %, they do so by intentionally skewing the figures to leave out large sections of the population, that if included, would bring the unemployment figure closer to 25 %.

Every major economic crash in history, oddly enough, was preceded by just the opposite in appearance, a sudden rise in the value of stocks. Why? Because the billionaires who influence the market the most, with their large stock purchases or sales in the billions of dollars in a single day, intentionally run up the stock market just before they sell their stocks so that they can receive the maximum value possible, though their very sales in this quantity inevitably crashes the market for everyone else. Such is the case at this hour. Do not be deceived by appearances. If you own stocks, NOW is the time to cash them in. Do it while you still can.

The main reason for the coming economic crisis is the little reported fact that ten years ago, 75 % of all global trade was with the US Dollar. Today it is 37% and dropping fast. When, not if, it reaches 33%, the Dollar will collapse against other international currencies, causing domestic and international hardship the world has never before seen. The interest on 20 Trillion Dollars of US debt (which doubled from 10 Trillion over the last eight years) will become too great for the weakened Dollar to bear. The domino effect will be global inflation and a repeat of the “Great Depression” of 1929, though likely worse, due to the growth of international interdependence, making it all the more severe.

If the skies were sunny as you left your house for the day, yet you saw your neighbor donning a raincoat, rain boots, and an umbrella, would you not consider that they might be privy to information about the future which had not yet reached your ears? In the same way, when the Department of HOME-land security purchases enough ammunition to shoot every American five times, local police departments purchase unprecedented amounts of riot gear, and the President of the United States signs dozens of Executive Orders regarding future procedures for a National Emergency, shouldn’t you also take notice and prepare accordingly?

The question is, what are YOU doing to protect your family and friends from this emending crisis?

For those who consider themselves “Christians” and believe that God will protect them without any effort on their part, might I suggest reading Matthew 4:5-7 and Genesis 41:17-36?

The fact is, with modern tire technology, the odds of having a flat tire on any given trip is only about a 1 in 1500 chance, nevertheless, would you feel comfortable or intelligent running a casual errand without a fully inflated spare tire, jack, and the appropriate fitting lug wrench? I doubt it. I would say that the possibility, or probability, of a soon economic collapse is somewhat greater than a 1 in 1500 chance, as astute billionaire George Soros and former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan have clearly indicated. As such, what are YOU doing to prepare for it?

As the above picture indicates, when a crisis occurs, whether it be a hurricane, earthquake, or an economic collapse, it only takes about thirty minutes for your local grocery store to become barren. Stocking up on food, water, water filters, flashlights, batteries, or whatever you deem appropriate, NOW before a crisis hits, seems like a reasonable thing to do, just like having an inflated spare tire in your car is essential before you have a flat. After all, it is better to have something you don’t need, than to need something you don’t have.

I will discuss this, and much more, in this week’s episode of “Conspiracy Corner News”.

Just click on the Youtube Link below to watch.

Brother Bart-

 Donate

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References

Banking Crisis Eminent

Economic Collapse Forecasted

Riot Control Gear Sales Soar

DHS Buys Enough Ammo to Shoot Every American Five Times

Bible Preparedness

The Prepper’s Blueprint

The post Are YOU Prepared ? (VIDEO) appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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Givers And Takers: What Will You Do With The Unprepared?

lost

As much as I wish it were not true, I do believe that within my lifetime, our society will reach a SHTF situation.  The nature and shape of this event is unknown to me but on some level, I dread the thought of the societal chaos that will occur, for better or for worse.

Now it may seem odd to include the words “for better” when referring to a SHTF situation but in looking back at history, it seems that advances in civilization have frequently risen from the ashes of chaos.  So, even though I may have to live through the disorganized and destructive forces of a global breakdown, the optimist in me is hopeful that the results will be beneficial to future generations – even if the generations may be hundred’s of years from now.

This leads me to the topic today:  What will you do if and when the SHTF?  Will you be a Giver to those who have failed to prepare or will you be a Taker from those who have prepared?

As some of my readers have indicated, in today’s world there are people that will walk in to a McDonald’s and demand free food.  If it is not forthcoming, they shoot the place up, causing harm to innocent bystanders.  For these people, there is a prevailing mentality of entitlement with no mindset oriented toward hard work, moral ethics and the family values so well ingrained in previous generations.

So where does this leave the prepper?  Where does this leave those of us that have saved our money, planned for the unexpected and lived a life of self-sufficiency?  When SHTF do we share what we have with our peers that have lived the good life with no concern for tomorrow?  Do we open our homes and our hearts?  Or do we lock ourselves up within our well-fortified homesteads and say no, you are not welcome here?

This is certainly not a new topic but one that must be addressed on an ongoing basis.  Why you ask?  Well for one, food is becoming more scarce and more expensive on a daily basis.  Something as simple and basic as a single potato can now cost as much as $1.00 each.  A buck a potato?  Five years ago that would have been unheard of.  Fuel to heat our homes and to cook our food is becoming precious and consider this:  gasoline, the mainstay source of power for our transportation systems is running $11 a gallon in Europe.  It won’t be long until the rest of the world will pay that much and I don’t know about you, but that will certainly curtail my ability and interest in freely moving around by private vehicle.

During some recent travels to the city, I saw copious and conspicuous consumption.  It was sickening.  And yet the mention of putting away some canned goods and extra water for a “just in case” situation was met with either a quizzical look, a blank stare, or an “are you one of those nut jobs?” comment.  This came from folks with a new car in the driveway next to a mailbox overflowing with monthly credit card bills totaling tens of thousands in debt. These same folks were also dining at the newest and the most chic of restaurants and were routinely coming home with shopping bags laden with brand new designer clothes.  (And by the way, those designer duds are often available for a fraction of the price on eBay.)

I just do not get it.  And as generous of spirit as I would like to be, I find myself hunkering down and reminding myself that I can not and will not be able to help these people.  Even more significant, I don’t want to help them.  For the  moment and maybe forever, I am losing compassion for those that will not take the few steps necessary to learn to fend for themselves.

One thing I know for sure:  I will not be a Taker.  But when SHTF, I will also not be a Giver to those that have turned their thumbs down to those of us that have learned to be self-sufficient and self-reliant, no matter what.

How about you?  Will you be a Giver when society breaks down?

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!

The post Givers And Takers: What Will You Do With The Unprepared? appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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