Grow Your Own Turmeric In a Pot

Grow Your Own Turmeric In a Pot | turmeric1 | Agriculture & Farming Organics

 

By: Ariana Marisol, REALfarmacy.com |

With reports of contaminated, toxic turmeric products flooding store shelves, there is no better time to start growing your own. Turmeric is one of the healthiest, nutrient rich herbs you can eat. Learn how to grow your own turmeric at home.

Turmeric can help prevent cancer, it eases arthritis symptoms, it can soothe an upset stomach, it can help the heart stay healthy, it’s a natural fat burner, it helps prevent Alzheimer’s, it can help lower cholesterol, and it can help treat depression! These are only a few of the many benefits of this amazing herb.

Turmeric is a perennial herb that re-shoots every spring. Growing turmeric organic in pots is not difficult.

Although turmeric thrives in tropical climates, it can be grown in temperate areas in the summer. You can always move your plant inside when temperatures begin to dip.

Growing Turmeric

Turmeric can be grown in garden beds or containers. Be sure to grow in well draining containers because water retention will cause rhizomes to rot, reducing yield.

I grew 4 rhizomes in a pot that was about 30 inches long and 12 inches deep, and they are doing great.

Turmeric can grow in USDA Zones 7 through 10. The plants cannot tolerate climates colder than 65 degrees F. Plant turmeric in spring to summer because the roots sprout well when the soil is warm.

Turmeric thrives well in direct or indirect sun, but it can also grow in light shade. Heavy shade for a prolonged amount of time will reduce the yield.

Turmeric does best in well drained loamy fertile soils. Mix cow manure, compost, river sand, and some all purpose organic fertilizer and your plant will thank you.

Planting

Buy some turmeric roots from the market (be sure they are organic). Select small rhizomes with one or two buds. Plant rhizomes about 7 to 10 inches apart and bury them in wet soil about 2 to 3 inches deep. Do not water until shoots appear. The roots will germinate/shoot in 3-6 weeks depending on the soil temperature. Turmeric shoots will appear in about 20 to 45 days after planting.

Grow fresh plants every 3 to 4 years or leave a few roots inside while harvesting. Once the plants grow, keep them well watered.

Bring your turmeric indoors once the temperature gets below 50 degrees F.

You can also start turmeric in pots indoors and move it outdoors when the temperature begins to rise.

Watering

Turmeric plants require consistent and adequate watering. But overwatering can slow down growth.

If you are growing your turmeric in a container or in a garden bed, water only when you feel the is soil slightly dry to the touch. This will prevent leaching out of nutrients due to overwatering.

If your turmeric is grown in a sandy soil or if it is growing in a dry, low humidity area, water often or mist the leaves.

Harvesting

A good indication that your plant has reached maturity is if its leaves begin to turn yellow and its stems begin to dry. The plant usually matures in 9 to 10 months after planting. At this time, the turmeric rhizomes can be harvested.

Harvesting is easy. All you have to do is dig up the entire plant including the roots.

Storage

Wipe fresh turmeric roots and wrap them in a paper towel and place them in a zip lock plastic bag. Then, place them in a refrigerator. This way they will remain fresh for 3 to 4 weeks. Cut the needed piece and refrigerate. For longer storage, slice, wrap, and then freeze for up to 2 months.

You can also peel the rhizomes and place them in a jar with vodka and store them in the fridge for at least a year.

Or you can peel turmeric root and place it in honey for at least a year as well.


Ariana Marisol is a contributing staff writer for REALfarmacy.com. She is an avid nature enthusiast, gardener, photographer, writer, hiker, dreamer, and lover of all things sustainable, wild, and free. Ariana strives to bring people closer to their true source, Mother Nature. She graduated The Evergreen State College with an undergraduate degree focusing on Sustainable Design and Environmental Science. Follow her adventures on Instagram.


Subscribe to The Sleuth Journal Newsletter for Daily Articles!


Save

The post Grow Your Own Turmeric In a Pot appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Roundup Accumulates In GMO Food, Proving Its Lack Of Safety

Roundup Accumulates In GMO Food, Proving Its Lack Of Safety | soybean-sprouts | Agriculture & Farming GMOs Toxins

An important manuscript accepted for publication in the journal Food Chemistry disproves the widely held notion that GMO crops are ‘substantially equivalent’ to their traditional counterparts; a notion which forms the basis for national and international agencies – including the U.S. FDA, the United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organization and the World Health Organization – declaring genetically modified foods to be safe without having performed adequate health risk assessments.

The manuscript titled, “Compositional differences in soybeans on the market: Glyphosate accumulates in Roundup Ready GM soybeans,”[i] was submitted by a team of researchers from Norway and the United Kingdom who explored the compositional differences of 31 soybean batches from Iowa, USA, which consisted of three different types:

  1. Genetically modified, glyphosate-tolerant soy (GM-soy);
  2. Unmodified soy cultivated using a conventional “chemical” cultivation regime;
  3. Unmodified soy cultivated using an organic cultivation regime.

Their analysis revealed the following discoveries:

  • “Organic soybeans showed the healthiest nutritional profile with more sugars, such as glucose, fructose, sucrose and maltose, significantly more total protein, zinc and less fibre than both conventional and GM-soy.”
  •  “Organic soybeans also contained less total saturated fat and total omega-6 fatty acids than both conventional and GM-soy.”
  • “GM-soy contained high residues of glyphosate and AMPA (mean 3.3 and 5.7mg/kg, respectively). Conventional and organic soybean batches contained none of these agrochemicals.”

They summarized their findings:

“Using 35 different nutritional and elemental variables to characterise each soy sample, we were able to discriminate GM, conventional and organic soybeans without exception, demonstrating “substantial non-equivalence” in compositional characteristics for ‘ready-to-market’ soybeans.” [emphasis added]

As we discussed in our previous article, “Extreme Toxicity of Roundup Destroys GM/Non-GM ‘Substantial Equivalence’ Argument,” an increasingly concerning body of peer-reviewed published research indicates that Roundup and related glyphosate-based herbicide formulations represent an extreme environmental and human health danger:

“If Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide were actually ‘safer than table salt’ as they once advertised, the consumption of GM food wouldn’t be nearly as controversial. The truth, however, is that virtually all GM food today contains residues of this toxic chemical, which disproves that GM and non-GM foods are ‘substantially equivalent,” and which is the primary doctrinal justification behind why GM foods are not properly safety tested and millions in this country eating them are living and breathing guinea pigs.”

Owing to the fact that glyphosate has now been identified as a ubiquitous environmental exposure, found in the majority of air and rain samples recently tested, groundwater, seawater and any glyphosate tolerant GM food, simply choosing to refrain from eating GM foods (which is exceedingly difficult owing to the lack of labeling) is not going to solve the problem of the incessant environmental fallout from the glyphosate-dependent GM agricultural system itself.  Pleading to regulatory agencies or lawmakers to provide us a right to choose to avoid GM ingredients is a worthwhile cause, but GM labeling is only a part of a larger battle, which includes refusing to buy foods that are made with GM ingredients or may be suspected to be, and moving towards an outright ban of agrochemicals and GM plants whose biopollution represents an irreversible threat to the biosphere, of which the human body forms an inextricable part.

In order to drive momentum towards mass awareness of the extreme health dangers associated with the use of Roundup and Roundup-Ready agriculture, we are offering a free PDF download of our accumulated research on the topic to be shared far and wide. It is a document consisting entirely of peer-reviewed and published research, with hyperlinks back to the original citation location on the National Library of Medicine’s bibliographic database. Please share and download it here today: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/sites/default/files/free_downloads/gpub_78151_toxic_ingredient_glyphosate_formulations.pdf

To learn more about the dangers of GM food, agricultural practices and agrichemicals, visit our regularly updated research section on the topic: Health Guide: GMOs.

 


Subscribe to The Sleuth Journal Newsletter for Daily Articles!


 

Save

The post Roundup Accumulates In GMO Food, Proving Its Lack Of Safety appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Congress Must Investigate Collusion Between Monsanto and the EPA

Congress Must Investigate Collusion Between Monsanto and the EPA | roundup-weedkiller | Agriculture & Farming General Health

“I have cancer, and I don’t want these serious issues in HED [EPA’s Health Effects Division] to go unaddressed before I go to my grave. I have done my duty.”

It’s been four years since Marion Copley, a 30-year EPA toxicologist, wrote those words to her then-colleague, Jess Rowland, accusing him of conniving with Monsanto to bury the agency’s own hard scientific evidence that it is “essentially certain” that glyphosate, the key ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup weedkiller, causes cancer.

Copley has since died. But her letter suggesting that EPA officials colluded with Monsanto to hide the truth about Monsanto’s flagship weedkiller has been given new life.

Thanks to the persistence of hundreds of plaintiffs in lawsuits alleging that they (or their deceased family members) were diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma after being exposed to Roundup, newly discovered internal emails and other documents paint an increasingly troubling and sinister picture of corruption.

In the coming weeks and months, reporters and lawyers will continue to sift through and analyze the mountain of new documents that include emails between Monsanto and EPA officials.

What we’ve seen so far may be just the tip of the iceberg. But after all the evidence has been analyzed and exposed, will the evidence of collusion be fatal to Monsanto? Or will we allow the collusion to continue to cause fatal illness?

Read the essay

 


Subscribe to The Sleuth Journal Newsletter for Daily Articles!


The post Congress Must Investigate Collusion Between Monsanto and the EPA appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

What is Organic Soil?

What is Organic Soil? | seedlings | Agriculture & Farming Organics Special Interests

Organic soil has been naturally amended by the decomposition of plants and animals and unfortunately, today, most of the soil in the world has been depleted by agribusiness. Farmers who produce certified organic produce must first develop soil that meets with the criteria of the USDA. This requires them to amend previously depleted soil with essential organic compounds with the intent of restoring soil with the original richness our planet previously enjoyed prior to the damage caused by modern day industrialization.

How Effective is Organic Soil?

Organic soil is better able to cultivate plants than non-organic agribusiness soil. Organic soil also has a composition that provides some mechanical benefit too as the organic amendment improves soil drainage and makes the soil less apt to “pack” so it breaks up easily for planting. Organic amendment greatly increases soil nutrient content and the soil becomes much more resistant to pathogenic invasion that can harm plant life. Healthy soil develops a powerful mycelial layer that works to detoxify the land from pesticides and chemicals.

Research shows soil with higher levels of decomposing organic matter deters pest infestations. Not only do organic farmers avoid using pesticides; they actually do not need them the same way conventional farmers do because the richness of the soil actually provides a sort of natural protection for plants. Crops grown in organic soil contain higher levels of nutrients, minerals, and antioxidants. Organic farming often uses 50 percent less of the total amount of energy to operate than the mechanized, chemically oriented methods of agribusiness.

Simply put, organic farming in nutrient-rich, organic soil is as good for the environment as it is for the consumer.

Organic Farmers May be Using Contaminated Water

You have to watch for this. As of yet, the USDA does not regulate water quality used in organic farming. This means that some farmers can, and do, use municipal water sources to cultivate their crops. Many of these sources contain dangerous contaminants that go right back into amended soil and
straight to the core of the plants you eat.

Discovering if your vegetables were grown with municipal water requires some effort on your part, you will need locate and contact the farm and ask them yourself. Ask them if they are using well water or purified water to irrigate their organic soil. Also ask if they have tested the water to make certain it is as healthy as the earth they grow your vegetables in. Conscientious farmers who love the earth and its people will answer these questions politely and directly.

Do not be afraid to ask, and find out the truth about your produce before you buy it.


Subscribe to The Sleuth Journal Newsletter for Daily Articles!


The post What is Organic Soil? appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

GMO Golden Rice Flops In New Trial, Mutant Plants Reduces Crop Yield

GMO Golden Rice Flops In New Trial, Mutant Plants Reduces Crop Yield | gmo-golden-rice | Agriculture & Farming GMOs Special Interests

By: Brandon Turbeville, Natural Blaze |

After millions of dollars and untold amounts of hype, the GM Lobby’s favorite crop is demonstrating itself to do the opposite of what it was allegedly intended to do.As evidenced by a new study, Golden Rice, which was engineered to produce the precursor of vitamin A (carotenoids) has shown extensive abnormalities in growth as well as reduced grain yield.

The researchers named several reasons for the poor performance of Golden Rice, one of which being, that the new gene interferes with the plant’s gene that produces growth hormones. In addition, the new gene was not solely active in the kernels as it was intended, but also in the leaves. Both issues caused a substantial reduction in the amount of chlorophyll which is essential for the life of the plant.

Interestingly enough, these unintended effects were not detected in previous experiments. And Golden Rice was advertised as being a crop that would be genetically stable.

For years, Golden Rice has been hyped by the GMO lobby, Big Ag corporations and the “charitable” NGO community as the miracle that would save the third world from vitamin A deficiency, blindness and starvation. But so far, as is the case with most GMO crops, golden rice has produced nothing.

Instead, it seems that years of repeating the term Golden Rice in relation to saving the world and painting anti-GMO activists as stubbornly forcing the third world to starve is mainly more effective as a PR campaign than anything else.

Big corporations and NGOs run by bankers and financiers could not care less about starvation in the third world. After all, banks and corporations are largely the reason why Africans live on a continent of unimaginable abundance yet starve to death on a daily basis.

If vitamin A deficiency is an issue and it certainly is, the answer is not to destroy the environment and genetically engineer a shaky and undependable toxic form of rice, it is quite simply to introduce a different species of rice that contains vitamin A. In many countries, it is the lack of availability of food – due to economic policy and financial interests – that is the reason so many suffer from malnutrition.

Golden Rice is not an answer to that problem – it is making that problem worse while producing good PR and billion-dollar profits from major corporations. This foolish adventure needs to be abandoned immediately and real solutions need to be examined.

The post GMO Golden Rice Flops In New Trial, Mutant Plants Reduces Crop Yield appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

How to Raise Meat Rabbits in Small Spaces

How to Raise Meat Rabbits in Small Spaces | rabbits | Agriculture & Farming Off-Grid & Independent Living PreparednessSurvival

Whether you are planning to survive disasters or simply want to be self-sufficient and less dependent on outside resources, raising your own meat animals is a smart choice. That said, raising farm animals can be tough for those who live in urban areas, small homes or apartments, or under the rule of restrictive homeowners associations. If that sounds like you, consider raising meat rabbits.  Rabbits make it possible to produce your own meat without raising an eyebrow!

Why rabbits? Meat rabbits are an excellent way to supplement your family food supply.  Rabbit meat is tender and mild, plus rabbit meat is one of the healthiest meat sources, even beating chicken for low calories, high protein, and lower cholesterol levels. Not only that, rabbit meat is also far lower in fat and is higher in calcium and phosphorus than other meats.

Perhaps one of the better reasons for raising rabbits for meat is that they can be raised just about anywhere. If you have a garage, a basement, a porch, a backyard or even a small corner of a living room, you can raise meat rabbits and produce quite a bit of meat for you and your family.  Sound interesting?  Here are some tips that will help you get started raising rabbits.

Raising Meat Rabbits in Small Spaces

Rabbits are an excellent choice no matter where you live. Meat rabbits are easy to breed and raise. They require very little space. Best of all, since they do not fall under the typical livestock category, they are not subject to zoning laws and restrictions like other types of livestock and small farm animals.

Production wise, a small triple stack of cages kept indoors will house a trio of rabbits that can produce between 30 and 60 kits (baby rabbits) per year.  Underneath each of the stacked cages is a catch pan to keep the area clean. The required space is about the same size that would be required to fit an average-sized chest of drawers.  Although larger areas can be created to house even more rabbits and more elaborate setups, a triple-stack hutch really does quite nicely.

Should rabbits be kept indoors?  Yes, when there is room, keeping your rabbits indoors makes the most sense. It is easier to provide a temperature controlled climate year-round and allows you to maximize your breeding schedule.

The cage size most appropriate for medium-sized meat rabbit breeds is 24 x 30 x 56.  There are other sizes available as well, but that would be a perfectly good size.

It is also possible to keep rabbits outdoors in a small yard.  All it takes is a few feet of space. Instead of a stack of cages, you will need hutches that have a portion enclosed for the rabbits to get out of the elements. There are a wide variety of types and styles of outdoor hutches available as either ready-made or DIY.  For do it yourself types, you can find free building plans online.

Hutches create very good accommodations for your rabbits that will keep them happy and healthy outdoors.

Housing your rabbits outside will cut down on the number of litters that can be bred each year. Does (mamma rabbits) will need winters off, and enough heat would not be possible to keep any resulting litters warm enough when first born. On the other hand, using an outdoor space may give you the ability to house a few more rabbits. This allows you to produce the same amount of meet by having extra litters during the warmer months.

While you keep the adults year-round, baby rabbits are usually slaughtered at 8 to 10 weeks.  The gestation period is only 28 to 31 days so the turnaround from breeding to dress out is very short.

Where to Get Meat Rabbits

There are rabbit breeders in all states, but they can be hard to find if you’ve never looked for them. The American Rabbit Breeder’s Association is a good place to start when looking for local breeders. The listing on the ARBA site is limited, however, and many good local breeders do not pay to be listed. You can find more choices on state rabbit breeder club websites like the Illinois Rabbit Breeder’s Association. Some state associations even have listings for neighboring states.

Other great resources are local county or state fairs.  Lucky for us, all states and most counties have their own annual fairs. Most, if not all, have rabbit exhibits for both open (adults), junior and 4-H classes. These are fantastic places to mingle with breeders from local and surrounding areas. At a fair, you will find a wide variety of breeds and will be able to familiarize with them in an up close, and personal way.

Selecting Your New Rabbits

Once you have decided on a breed of meat rabbit, and have an area set up to care for them, it’s time to start looking for your own breeding pair or breeding trio. If you can make an appointment with a local breeder, you will get a lot of information and help on how to handle and care for your new rabbits. There are also local swap meets and livestock exhibits that may have rabbits available for sale. These can be good places to find new stock but, you are less likely to get individual attention from sellers and will be on your own in making sure your selections are healthy.

One good thing with rabbits is that while they certainly can get sick, or be diseased, in general, they are incredibly hardy animals. When selecting your rabbits, the first thing you want to look for is clear, clean eyes and noses. The ears should also be free of any accumulation that could signal infection or mites. They should never have an offensive odor or look like they have been sitting in wet conditions. The anus should be clean and the vent should be clean and dry.  Naturally, the animal’s coat should be clean and unstained. These are not just aesthetic aspects. They are indicators of good care and good health.

The next part of checking out your rabbits for purchase can get a little trickier because you are going to need to grasp and turn the rabbit over.  If you are new to handling rabbits, it would be best to try and find a breeder who can help you so you don’t harm yourself or the animal.

Keep in mind that when handling a rabbit, always grasp them around the ears with thumb and forefinger on either side of the head. Do not lift them by the ears. This can be especially harmful to the heavier adult meat rabbits, but it can damage even small, light rabbit ears. Grasping the ears with the remaining fingers only helps you steady the head and keep control if the rabbit gets scared and tries to get away.

While holding the head, gently run your free hand over the loin and down the hips. This will give you a good feel for the meat on the back of the rabbit. The animal should feel firm and rounded. While maintaining your grip on the head, and the other hand on the rear, scoop the hips under and turn the rabbit over, keeping them close to the body.

You should quickly move the hand under the rear of the bunny up to grasp the hind legs when dealing with skittish rabbits, or those you are unfamiliar with. Those hind feet can be quite powerful.  With the rabbit in this position, check the nails to see if they are overgrown. You should also use the hand not holding the rabbits head to lift the upper lip and pull down the lower lip gently and look at the front teeth of the rabbit. They should not overlap, be buck-toothed, or be crooked and over-grown.

Rabbit Care and Breeding

First of all, let’s start with some definitions.  Female rabbits are referred to as does. Males are bucks. Baby rabbits are kits.  Now that we have that out of the way, let’s talk about caring for and breeding your rabbits.

Rabbits do not have a lot of fancy requirements. You will need a food bowl and a drip water bottle similar to what is used for hamsters and gerbils and the cages. In addition, when breeding, you will need a nesting box for each doe you are breeding.

The breeding process itself is amazingly simple. You take the doe out of her cage and put her in with the buck. That’s it. Watch and wait. If the doe is receptive, the breeding will take place immediately and be over quickly. Do not be alarmed when the buck does a backflip off and looks like he had a stroke. That’s normal, and he will get up immediately.

If the female runs around the cage and does not let the buck near enough to mount, remove her and try again in a day or two. Never, under any circumstances take the buck to the doe’s cage. The does are extremely territorial and will attack the buck even if they are ready to breed. When put in the buck’s cage they will not be as aggressive.  Also, it is a good idea not to leave the pair alone. If she is not ready to breed she may fight off his advances if you don’t take her out of the cage.  Bucks are persistent and do not take no for an answer well.

Once you witness a coupling, remove the doe and place her back in her cage. That’s all there is to it. In 28 to 31 days you will likely have babies. While there are times when the breeding isn’t successful, they don’t say ‘breeding like rabbits’ for nothing. They are very prolific.

One to two weeks before the doe is due, place a clean nesting box in the cage with her. Place some straw inside so she can make a nest. A few days before she delivers, she will also pull out fur to add to the nest.

If your cages are in a garage or other unheated area, and you are breeding during the winter, a heat lamp placed above the cage will help keep the area warm enough.

Rabbits can be weaned as soon as they are eating solid food, at about 4 weeks. Some breeders prefer to place those kits in grow pens to go on to slaughter age at 8 to 10 weeks, so they can get the mother back in condition to breed again quickly. If space for a grow-out cage is at a premium, however, keeping the babies with their mother the full 8 to 10 weeks is fine.

Dressing out Meat Rabbits

Rabbits are one of the easiest and most pleasant animals to butcher. If you have ever slaughtered chickens, sheep, or goats, you will find that rabbits take far less time and space. They are great for people who have never dressed out their own meat animals before because the learning curve is very modest.

Here are the things you need for butchering:

A gambrel is basically a set of hooks that hold the animal up by the hind legs so you can access it easily.  You will need it to hang the carcass on while dressing it out. These are available premade, but they are simple to construct on your own as well. A sturdy stick, some rope and a couple of “S” hooks will do the trick.

You will also need a sharp knife. Fish filet knives work well. Even a small paring knife can do the job if it is sharp enough. Place a bucket directly beneath the gambrel so that it will catch the blood and offal. Offal is the term used for the non-edible parts of the inside of a meat animal.

Here are the steps needed to butcher a meat rabbit:

To slaughter the rabbit, grasp the hind legs firmly and place the upper part of the rabbit’s body on a firm surface. With a hammer (or your hand if you are strong enough), hit the rabbit directly behind the ears on the back of the neck. This will knock them out. Using the sharp knife, slit the throat and cut through the neck.

Allow the carcass to bleed out into the bucket for a few minutes, and then make a small incision between the bone and tendon of the rear leg at the hock (knee joint). Hang one leg from the incision on one of the gambrel hooks.

From the incision on each rear leg, insert the knife tip between the meat and the skin. Slice down toward the groin. Repeat with the opposite rear leg. Cut off the tail of the rabbit and connect the slices in the pelt of the rear legs. Cut off the front feet at the knee joint. This is easily done with a quick stroke of the knife.

Peel the pelt off of the legs, then grasp it firmly once it is at the body and pull downwards until it is free of the front legs. It will come off in one solid tube of skin and fur.

Put the pelt aside if you are going to keep it for tanning later.

Gently insert the tip of the knife into the belly at the groin. Be careful not to cut too deep. You just want to cut the thin skin. Slice down toward the breast until you get to the rib cage. With a thumb and forefinger, grasp the anus end of the intestine and pinch it as close to the anal opening as possible to avoid any fecal matter from escaping. Pull down to release it, and let all of the intestines and organs fall forward out of the opening.

Remove the liver, heart, and kidneys if you want to keep them, and place them in a clean dish. Rabbit livers are delicious. They are similar in size and texture to chicken livers, but a little more tender.

Dump all of the offal into a garbage bag and tie up securely.

Rinse the remaining carcass under cool water. Cut up or bag whole for later use. Place in the refrigerator for a day if you are going to freeze the resulting meat or use immediately. If you are not going to use the meat immediately, do not use it for at least 24 hours so it has the time to go through rigor mortis. Once 24 hours in the refrigerator is passed, freeze or use the meat.

Using Rabbit Meat

Rabbit meat is tender, mild meat. It can be used in almost any recipe, replacing other types of meat. However, because it is such a mild meat, it is best in recipes normally containing chicken, or in rabbit specific recipes.

You will find that all young rabbits are excellent simply barbecued, fried, stewed or baked. Older rabbits can also be used for meat once they are no longer up to breeding.  If you butcher an older animal, replace it with a rabbit from a resulting litter, or purchase another outside breeding animal.  Prepare the older rabbit for eating the same as you would a young rabbit.

There are pros and cons to consuming older rabbit meat. The animals are usually twice the size of the usual slaughter age rabbits, so they produce twice as much meat. On the other hand, the meat is usually a little tougher. Many consider older rabbit suitable only for stews or ground meat.  That said, many find that even older rabbits taste fine in any of the ways younger rabbit meat is prepared for the dinner table.

The Final Word

No matter how big or small your rabbit breeding operation, these little livestock animals offer the most bang for the buck.  In addition, they are pleasant to have around.

Word of caution: it is a good idea not to allow family members of any age to make pets out of your meat rabbits.  This also applies to your breeding rabbits since they, too, may end up on the dinner table at some point in time.  That said, for me personally, it would be difficult not to name them.  Many of my friends name their chickens that ultimately end up as Sunday dinner.

Finally, in closing, I would like to thank my collegue, Tami P. (you know who you are!), who raises meat rabbits and has provided valuable insight into this article.

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!

The post How to Raise Meat Rabbits in Small Spaces appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Where Oh Where Are the GMO Apples?

Where Oh Where Are the GMO Apples? | apples | Agriculture & Farming GMOs Petitions

It’s a little too early for Easter egg hunts. How about a pre-Easter GMO apple hunt?

We recently reported that Intrexon, marketer of the GMO Arctic Apple, is quietly selling the apples in 10 retail grocery chains in the Midwest. Along with Friends of the Earth and Center for Food Safety, and with your help, we’ve been trying to figure out exactly which stores are selling the apples, in which states.

So far, we’ve come up empty. But we’re not ready to give up.

If you live in the Midwest, can you help us hunt down the stores that are already selling GMO apples?

Intrexon’s GMO apples will supposedly bear a label identifying the brand—Arctic. But they won’t have a label that says “GMO.” (You can thank Congress and its DARK Act, for that).

The GMO apple uses an experimental, unregulated technology called RNA interference that keeps the apple from turning brown after it’s been sliced. Scientists say this process may have negative unintended impacts on human health and the environment.

You can help disrupt the market for these apples. But we need you to act now during this trial run in grocery stores.

TAKE ACTION: Tell grocery stores to commit to keeping GMO apples off their shelves!

Live in the Midwest? Help us find the stores selling GMO apples.

h/t: Organic Consumers Association

The post Where Oh Where Are the GMO Apples? appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Extreme Toxicity of Roundup Destroys GM/Non-GM ‘Substantial Equivalence’ Argument

Extreme Toxicity of Roundup Destroys GM/Non-GM 'Substantial Equivalence' Argument | cornfield-farm | Agriculture & Farming Special Interests Toxins

If Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide were actually ‘safer than table salt’ as they once advertised, the consumption of GM food wouldn’t be nearly as controversial. The truth, however, is that virtually all GM food today contains residues of this toxic chemical, which disproves that GM and non-GM foods are ‘substantially equivalent,” which is the primary doctrinal justification behind why GM foods are not properly safety tested and millions in this country eating them are living and breathing guinea pigs. 

There was a time when Monsanto claimed their patented herbicide Roundup was “safer than table salt” and “practically nontoxic,”  and aggressively marketed this message until 1996, when they were ordered by Dennis C. Vacco, the Attorney General of New York, to pull the ads.[1]

Fast forward 15 years, after millions of farmers around the world bought into the false advertising and who, as a result, are now driving the production and use of several hundred million pounds of the chemical annually, Roundup herbicide is beginning to look eerily like Monsanto’s Agent Orange 2.0.

Indeed, within the scientific community and educated public alike, there is a growing awareness that Roundup herbicide, and its primary ingredient glyphosate, is actually a broad spectrum biocide, in the etymological sense of the word: “bio” (life) and “cide” (kill) – that is, it broadly, without discrimination kills living things, not just plants.  Moreover, it does not rapidly biodegrade as widely claimed, and exceedingly small amounts of this chemical – in concentration ranges found in recently sampled rain, air, groundwater, and human urine samples – have DNA-damaging and cancer cell proliferation stimulating effects.

You don’t have to look very far to find research documenting its extreme and wide-ranging  toxicity.  Anyone with a smart phone can now access the accumulating body of experimental and epidemiological research freely available on the National Library of Medicine’s citation database MEDLINE, proving that glyphosate-based agrichemicals have been linked to over 40 health conditions, from Parkinson’s to Leukemia, and over two dozen modes of toxicity, from causing damage to the DNA to disrupting hormone receptors, from suppressing the immune system to damaging neurons. To view all 26 adverse physiological actions visit our open access, MEDLINE-derived Glyphosate Formulation research page.

Once the public begin to let the reality of Roundup’s parts-per-trillion toxicity sink in, then another realization naturally follows.  The vast majority of GM crops are designed to survive chemical poisoning with Roundup. So-called ‘Roundup ready’ or ‘glyphosate-resistant’ plants are sprayed with this chemical, ensuring they are contaminated with toxic residues. This means that the potentially endless, impossible to resolve debate over whether GM transgenes inserted into food and feed crops produce ‘allergenic’ or ‘potentially toxic’ proteins only scratches the surface of the problem, acting like a smokescreen distracting from the more obvious problems associated with the clear and present threat of glyphosate/Roundup toxicity.

Essentially, if you are eating anything that is not explicitly labeled non-GMO or USDA certified organic (and there are reasons to doubt the veracity of this logo), you are being exposed to Roundup and its toxic metabolites. And when we say ‘exposed’ we are using a euphemism for poisoned. This also means that the primary doctrinal justification for not labeling, adequately safety testing, and regulating GM foods, namely, the view that they are ‘substantially equivalent,’ no longer holds any water. Roundup poisoned food is never equivalent to Roundup-free food. 

In order to drive momentum towards mass awareness of Roundup and Roundup-Ready agriculture toxicity, we are offering a free PDF download of our accumulated research on the topic to be shared far and wide. It is a 100% peer-reviewed and published research document, with hyperlinks back to the original citation location on the National Library of Medicine’s MEDLINE. Please download it here today: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/sites/default/files/free_downloads/gpub_78151_toxic_ingredient_glyphosate_formulations.pdf

For additional research and articles on the dangers associated with GMO food, visit our research page on the topic: Health Guide: GMO Research


[1] The New York Times, Monsanto recruits the horticulturist of the San Diego Zoo to pitch its popular herbicide, May 29, 1997

 

© March 12, 2017  GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here http://www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter.

The post Extreme Toxicity of Roundup Destroys GM/Non-GM ‘Substantial Equivalence’ Argument appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

GMO Potatoes Will Hit Stores and Restaurants Soon…If They Haven’t Already

GMO Potatoes Will Hit Stores and Restaurants Soon…If They Haven’t Already | potatoes | Agriculture & Farming GMOs Sleuth Journal Special Interests

If you prefer to avoid genetically modified foods, here’s another one to avoid. GMO potatoes will be joining  GMO apples at a store near you very soon – if they aren’t there already.

Last week, the FDA added their approval (again) to that of the EPA, giving the go-ahead for these potatoes to be planted this spring for harvest in the fall.

The rollout of the spuds has been cloaked in a fair bit of secrecy. Generally, one would expect something “new and improved” to be presented via a high-budget advertising campaign, press releases, and a giant hurrah. But, since marketers know that the public doesn’t really want anyone messing with the genetics of their favorite root vegetable, they’ve just sort of snuck them into the food supply.

Back in 2015 the FDA assessed and passed genetically modified potatoes as safe for human consumption. These potatoes are known by their trade name, Innate and so far three varieties have been assessed. They are Ranger Russet, Russet Burbank, and Atlantic, produced by J.R. Simplot Company. (source)

The claims of the modified potatoes are that:

  • They’re engineered to resist the pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine
  • They don’t brown when sliced
  • They produce 70% less acrylamide when fried, a chemical said to cause cancer – leading to ridiculous claims by the company that these are “cancer-fighting potatoes”
  • They don’t bruise as easily as non-GMO potatoes
  • They don’t get those black spots in them

Althealthworks.com reported in July 2015 that GMO potatoes (which were, of course, not labeled as GMO potatoes) were already on store shelves.

Until just recently, little has been seen in the press since then regarding the sale of these spuds, the majority of which are produced in Idaho – the home of J.R. Simplot.

It all started with Monsanto.

I’m sure that’s not a surprise to anyone.

Back in 1998,  Monsanto was the company marketing the Frankenspuds, a variety called NewLeaf  Superior. The potatoes were Monsanto’s first GM crop and they were immediately rejected in the United States. The public just wasn’t ready for the most popular veggie in the country to be engineered in a lab.

In the same year that NewLeaf was launched, a group of 30 researchers with a grant of 2 million Euros halted the GMO potato program due to a variety of health concerns. Watch the video below from 46:55 to hear what declassified documents have to say about genetically modified vegetables.

YouTube

So, according to the video above declassified documents show that there are most likely health issues associated with GMO produce.

Are the potatoes marketed by J.R. Simplot any different? Well, we have no idea because the FDA passed the NewLeaf Superior back in 1995 and it was the public backlash rather than health concerns that saw Monsanto themselves withdrawing the spuds from sale in 2001…three years after they were banned in Europe due to the research cited above.

Interestingly some of the varieties being produced by Simplot also appear on the  old Monsanto portfolio:

Monsanto NewLeaf potato which incorporate a Bt gene conferring resistance to Colorado Potato Beetle was first approved by the US regulatory agencies in early 1995. The GE Russet Burbank potato was first transformed and appeared in Canada food chain in 1996, Bt varieties of Atlantic and superior soon followed. In both cases, the potatoes were labeled as “NatureMark” and were accompanied by informational brochures detailing the new technology. In late 1998, Monsanto acqired final approval for a second type of GE potatoes: a Russet Burbank marketed as “NewLeaf Plus” which combines the Bt trait with resistance to the Potato Leaf Roll Virus (PLRV). Shortly after that, in 1999, Monsanto added a third GE potato “NewLeaf Y” combining Bt with resistance to the Potato Virus Y (PVY). This GE trait was available in both Russet Burbank and Shepody varieties.(source)

Which companies are using GMO potatoes?

It’s impossible to say which companies do use GMO potatoes in their products. It’s usually the companies that don’t use them that make a statement, like this one from McCain:

Since 1999 McCain has abided by a policy of not using genetically modified potatoes in any of our products globally. This policy holds true today, but we also recognize that science holds the potential to address many of the issues that continue to challenge the world with respect to the sustainable production of affordable and nutritious food to meet the demands of a growing population. It is the positive potential of science that drives our continued interest in plant biotechnology, and as such, we actively monitor and may participate in research and development projects that seek to offer significant social benefits. Regulatory compliance and consumer acceptance for the use of any new technology will guide our actions. (source)

So not McCain isn’t using them yet – but they haven’t ruled out using them in the future if they figure it wouldn’t negatively affect sales.  Don’t expect an announcement if they do.

In 2015, ConAgra, who supplies fries through Lamb Weston to restaurant chains, also said they don’t plan to use the Frankenspuds:

“All Lamb Weston frozen potato products are made with non-GMO potatoes, in line with customer demand,” a company statement said. (source)

McDonald’s issued a similar statement in 2014. Which makes no difference at all if they are using GMO soy products and corn products, but I digress.

How can you avoid GMO Potatoes?

It should be remembered that Simplot is supplying the seeds for these GMO potatoes to farmers all over the country. It is those farmers who are getting the potatoes into the local food chain, especially if they sell at markets and to small stores where the potatoes are sold loose, without the plastic bags that are beloved by supermarkets. Most of what you purchase from the loose bins are completely unlabeled.

If you want to avoid genetically modified spuds, these tips can help.

  • Beware of the brand names Ranger Russet, Russet Burbank, and Atlantic
  • Look for merits on the label like “reduced bruising” and “fewer black spots”
  • Look for any reference or link to the J.R. Simplot Company
  • Look for the word “innate” on the label
  • Buy organic potatoes whenever possible
  • Look for the “Non-GMO Project Verified” label (Wisconsin Healthy Grown is one brand that has this seal)
  • Consider buying Yukon Gold or a more rare variety
  • Be leery of processed food containing potatoes, like frozen fries, tater tots, and chips. (Kettle Chips are non-GMO verified) Buy organic if you must get processed potatoes.
  • Restaurants may also be likely to use GMO potatoes since they don’t brown as easily as regular potatoes

For more information on avoiding GMOs, even if you’re on a budget, check out this article. (It was written a couple of years ago, so there’s no mention of the potatoes in it.)

Of course, with these potatoes and seeds coming to a store/farm near you this fall, the best way to ensure that you aren’t eating GMO spuds is to grow your own and then seed your own next crop from your last crop.

Growing potatoes is easy. You can even do it in a heavy duty garbage bag on a balcony. Why You Should Grow Potatoes gives a very simple growing guide as well as discussing the nutritional benefits of potatoes.

What do you think about GMO potatoes?

I’m sure my comments section will be filled with people proclaiming the wonders of GMO potatoes, just like they did when I wrote about GMO apples. Hey, knock yourself out. I’m not trying to keep you from consuming your precious genetically modified food-like substances. This information is for people who wish to avoid it – something they have every right to do, just like you seem to want to go out of your way to consume these foods. Who knows, maybe you’ll end up with superhuman, Spiderman or Incredible Hulk-like powers if you eat enough of them. Go for the gusto.

So what do you all think? Would you use genetically modified potatoes? Will this change your shopping habits?  Why or why not? Feel free to share in the comments below.


Subscribe to The Sleuth Journal Newsletter for Daily Articles!


Save

The post GMO Potatoes Will Hit Stores and Restaurants Soon…If They Haven’t Already appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Hemp: Puzzling Prohibition

Hemp: Puzzling Prohibition | marijuiana | Agriculture & Farming Government Government Control Organics Petitions

In the 1940s, hemp farmers were considered “patriotic supporters” of the war effort. But in 1970, President Richard Nixon signed the Controlled Substances Act, making it illegal to grow industrial hemp.

Thanks to that law—which mistakenly lumps industrial hemp in with marijuana—U.S. consumers can buy hemp seeds at our health food stores, or hemp building materials from building suppliers, or clothes made from hemp. But U.S. farmers face a jail sentence for growing the type of hemp used to make those products.

Americans bought more than $600 million worth of hemp products in 2016. Almost all those products were imported from Europe, China or Canada. Because what was once a dominant, lucrative and largely sustainably grown crop here in the U.S., is now outlawed.

Congress has two bipartisan bills which would bring back hemp farming and create rural jobs. A White House petition asking the Trump Administration to pass these laws is nearing the critical 100,000 signatures mark. We need just north of 12,000 more signatures by February 19 to force the White House to respond. Can you help?

TAKE ACTION: Sign the White House petition to let American farmers grow hemp

Learn more

The post Hemp: Puzzling Prohibition appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS