Symptoms of Liver Toxicity

Symptoms of Liver Toxicity | fatigue | General Health Special Interests Toxins

Symptoms of liver toxicity are not always easy to pinpoint. Many conditions associated with an overloaded liver are problems that can arise from a number of causes. Although some conditions, such as fatigue or irritability are often just part of life, and not necessarily the result of liver deficiencies, ignoring pervasive health conditions is never advised. Instead, we should view health problems as weeds to be removed. Often times, ailments resulting from imbalances and toxicity within the body spring up in multiple ways and appeasing deficiencies can help to alleviate them at the source.

Understand What Causes Toxicity

Your concern should increase if you find yourself regularly experiencing multiple adverse conditions at once, especially when that becomes “the norm.” If “the norm” for you is constant misery and dis-ease, it may be an indication that your body and liver are overloaded with function-impeding toxins. In such instances, the best course of action is to take inventory of your lifestyle to remove the sources of toxins and complement that lifestyle change with a liver cleanse using all-natural, organic methods.

Symptoms of Liver Toxicity

One of the most common symptoms of liver toxicity is chronic fatigue. Many people with overburdened livers will wake up in the morning feeling lethargic and drained, as if they have had no sleep at all. When you’re feeling weighed down before you even start your day, it takes a great deal of effort to get momentum up. It comes without surprise that persons experiencing this are often finished by mid day, a slow down often accompanied by stiffness and aches.

Chronic fatigue can stem from a number of origins and immediately assuming liver dysfunction and overreacting inappropriately should be avoided. However, it is a condition that requires attention and investigation may determine impairment of liver function to be a contributing factor. If it begins to be accompanied by emotional instability, then there is a greater cause for concern. The liver’s performance can directly impact emotional constitution. A toxic liver can be the catalyst for various forms of depression, which is really a form of anger turned inward. General moodiness, feelings of despair, and occasional outbursts of anger can all be caused by a burdened liver.

There are chemicals in the brain that cause a variety of emotional disturbances when they’re out of balance and moodiness may or may not be an actual symptom of liver toxicity. However, many people do not realize that the liver’s operation, or operational deficiencies, play significant role in emotional health. The annoyances of a bad day are one thing, chronic and wide mood swings accompanied with physical energy are another.

Symptoms of liver toxicity can also manifest as problems with the digestive system. Swelling and bloating after a meal, along with the seeming inability to lose weight regardless of diet or exercise, are possible indicators of liver dysfunction. These conditions can be further exacerbated by frequent alcohol consumption, a heavy meat diet, eating foods with refined sugars, and processed foods high in carbohydrates.

A Toxic Liver Needs Detoxification

If you’re constantly feeling drained or overloaded with negative emotions, you may be suffering from a form of liver dysfunction and could benefit by a simple cleansing.

As I said before, general, non-specific problems like chronic fatigue, moodiness, and digestive upset should not immediately be assumed to be the result of liver dysfunction. They may or may not be. Often times, for most people, determining what is causing them to feel less than their best is the difficult first step in turning things around. Body burden is an interesting subject because it affects different people differently. If you’re experiencing what you consider to be ill-health on a “regular” basis, something is amiss; the reality is an overload of toxins is often to blame. If you feel liver toxicity is to blame, it’s recommended you engage in an all-natural liver cleanse.

The post Symptoms of Liver Toxicity appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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Turmeric May Repair And Regenerate Diabetic Liver Function

turmeric

Groundbreaking research published in the Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand found that curcumin, the primary polyphenol in turmeric, is capable of repairing and even regenerating the liver tissues of diabetic rats.

The research was performed at Srinakharinwirot University in Bangkok, Thailand. The administration of curcumin to diabetic rats, whose livers showed the characteristic pathology and destruction of liver tissues and microvasculature, resulted in significant reversal of the condition.

They noted:

Fascinatingly, liver microvasculature in curcumin treated group developed into regenerate and repair into healthy and normal characteristics.” They concluded: “These results optimistically demonstrated the potential use of curcumin as a novel therapeutic agent in liver pathology of diabetic rats.

Curcumin is actually one of the world’s most thoroughly studied and well-characterized natural compounds, with over 5100 references in peer-reviewed publications. Over 1400 of these have been selected for inclusion in our database, and indicate its value in over 500 health conditions. Considering its remarkably wide range of therapeutic benefits, it is not surprising that curcumin has been researched to either prevent or treat, liver disease.

For example, you can view 36 studies on curcumin’s anti-liver cancer properties here: curcumin liver cancer. Perhaps even more impressive are these 78 studies on curcumin’s liver-protective properties: hepatoprotective properties of curcumin. Another 30 studies indicate its profound value in improving liver fibrosis.

There are also a broad range of therapeutic effects relevant to diabetes, as illustrated by the screenshot of the section on our database below.

Also, it is important to realize that curcumin, relative to conventional pharmacological agents, has a broad, and extremely effective therapeutic profile. In fact, we have indexed over 160 distinct, beneficial pharmacological actions associated with curcumin alone. Moreover, curcumin has been shown to be at least as effective, and in some cases superior to the following drug types:
  • NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs)[i]
  • Hydrocortisone[ii](for inflammation)
  • Prednisone[iii](for inflammation)
  • Corticosteroids (uveitis)[iv]
  • Memantine and Diclofenac[v](for memory)
  • Atorvastain (for inflammation-mediated endothelial dysfunction)[vi]
  • Dexamethasone (lung transplantation or injury)[vii] [viii]
  • Fluoxetine [Prozac] and imipramine [Tofranil] (depression)[ix]
  • Acetylsalicylic acid (Thrombosis and Arthritis)[x]
  • Quinidine (myocardial ischemia)[xi]
  • Oxaliplatin (Colorectal Cancer)[xii]
  • Metformin (Gluconeogenesis/Blood Sugar)[xiii]

Finally, curcumin’s superiority over conventional pharmacological agents in treating cancer is well characterized. We have indexed 36 studies showing curcumin is ability to inhibit and/or kill drug-resistance cancers. Even more impressive, here are 27 studies showing that curcumin can killmulti-drug resistance cancers.

We will end with a simple image. Turmeric, the mother plant if you will, which gives rise to the compound curcumin. Do you see how the Earth provides this gift for free? It simply grows out of the ground. There is love in this fact. I hope you can appreciate the profound meaning of this gift. For additional information on our Turmeric Database, the world’s most exhaustive, view the youtube below

RESOURCES
[i] Yasunari Takada, Anjana Bhardwaj, Pravin Potdar, Bharat B Aggarwal. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents differ in their ability to suppress NF-kappaB activation, inhibition of expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and cyclin D1, and abrogation of tumor cell proliferation.Oncogene. 2004 Dec 9;23(57):9247-58. PMID: 15489888

[ii] Min Xu, Bin Deng, Yeuk-Lung Chow, Zhong-Zhen Zhao, Bin Hu. Effects of curcumin in treatment of experimental pulmonary fibrosis: a comparison with hydrocortisone. J Ethnopharmacol. 2007 Jun 13;112(2):292-9. Epub 2007 Mar 13. PMID: 17434272

[iii] Bi Chen, De-Ping Zhang, Wei Gao. [Effect of curcumin on the expression of collagen type I protein and transforming growth factor-beta1mRNA in pulmonary fibrosis rats]. Zhonghua Lao Dong Wei Sheng Zhi Ye Bing Za Zhi. 2008 May;26(5):257-61. PMID: 18727865

[iv] B Lal, A K Kapoor, O P Asthana, P K Agrawal, R Prasad, P Kumar, R C Srimal. Efficacy of curcumin in the management of chronic anterior uveitis. Phytother Res. 1999 Jun;13(4):318-22. PMID: 10404539

[v] Elham H A Ali, Nadia M S Arafa. Comparative protective action of curcumin, memantine and diclofenac against scopolamine-induced memory dysfunction. Fitoterapia. 2011 Jan 26. Epub 2011 Jan 26. PMID: 21277954

[vi] P Usharani, A A Mateen, M U R Naidu, Y S N Raju, Naval Chandra. Effect of NCB-02, atorvastatin and placebo on endothelial function, oxidative stress and inflammatory markers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, 8-week study. Drugs R D. 2008;9(4):243-50. PMID: 18588355

[vii] Jiayuan Sun, Weigang Guo, Yong Ben, Jinjun Jiang, Changjun Tan, Zude Xu, Xiangdong Wang, Chunxue Bai. Preventive effects of curcumin and dexamethasone on lung transplantation-associated lung injury in rats. Crit Care Med. 2008 Apr;36(4):1205-13. PMID: 18379247

[viii] J Sun, D Yang, S Li, Z Xu, X Wang, C Bai. Effects of curcumin or dexamethasone on lung ischaemia-reperfusion injury in rats. Cancer Lett. 2003 Mar 31;192(2):145-9. PMID: 18799504

[ix] Jayesh Sanmukhani, Ashish Anovadiya, Chandrabhanu B Tripathi. Evaluation of antidepressant like activity of curcumin and its combination with fluoxetine and imipramine: an acute and chronic study. Acta Pol Pharm. 2011 Sep-Oct;68(5):769-75. PMID: 21928724

[x] R Srivastava, V Puri, R C Srimal, B N Dhawan. Effect of curcumin on platelet aggregation and vascular prostacyclin synthesis. Arzneimittelforschung. 1986 Apr;36(4):715-7. PMID: 3521617

[xi] M Dikshit, L Rastogi, R Shukla, R C Srimal. Prevention of ischaemia-induced biochemical changes by curcumin&quinidine in the cat heart. Indian J Med Res. 1995 Jan;101:31-5. PMID: 7883281

[xii] Lynne M Howells, Anita Mitra, Margaret M Manson. Comparison of oxaliplatin- and curcumin-mediated antiproliferative effects in colorectal cell lines. Int J Cancer. 2007 Jul 1;121(1):175-83. PMID: 17330230

[xiii] Teayoun Kim, Jessica Davis, Albert J Zhang, Xiaoming He, Suresh T Mathews. Curcumin activates AMPK and suppresses gluconeogenic gene expression in hepatoma cells. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2009 Oct 16;388(2):377-82. Epub 2009 Aug 8. PMID: 1

© May 5, 2016 GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here http://www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter.

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The post Turmeric May Repair And Regenerate Diabetic Liver Function appeared first on The Sleuth Journal.


Source: Alternative news journal

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Liver Health: The Role Of Turmeric In Fatty Liver Disease

Liver Health: The Role Of Turmeric In Fatty Liver Disease

Fatty liver is a condition that’s affecting more and more people every day and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is the most widely experienced. Obesity and diabetes, two major health threats, are conditions that drastically increase one’s chances of developing fatty liver. A new study is showing that the polyphenols in turmeric may be helpful for reducing the risk of fatty liver while decreasing stress at the cellular level. This study is just one of the recent examples in the literature showing a strong benefit of turmeric with liver health.

Turmeric and Fatty Liver

A recent study set to publish in the December 2015 issue of Archives of Animal Nutrition examined the effect of turmeric polyphenols on the livers of cows. [1] Since many conventional feedlots are crowded and dirty, cows are under a great deal of stress. This stress causes physiological changes that impact the health of the liver in much the same way as stress impacts the liver (among other organs) in humans. It has been suggested that physiological stress of the endoplasmic reticulum in the liver contributes to fatty liver development, just like excess consumption of refined sugars.

In the study, a major stress hormone in the liver was significantly reduced in the group of cows fed the polyphenol mixture consisting of turmeric and green tea. In addition, the study also saw reduction in irritation markers, suggesting a possible risk reduction for fatty liver. The researchers commented that turmeric polyphenols may be helpful in decreasing fatty liver risk in cows. Considering that the induction of fatty liver works in the same way, could turmeric be helpful in fighting fatty liver in humans, too? It can’t be said for certain but this isn’t the first example of good news like this. [2]

The Secret Benefits of Turmeric

Turmeric has far more benefits than just adding color and flavor to your curry. An explosion of research in the field of nutrition has revealed surprising benefits of turmeric, from combating the damage of UV rays to protecting against neurological disorders. [3] Turmeric could very well be one of the most healthiest spices in the world. There is also some evidence that turmeric may support a healthy aging process and aid with weight loss. It seems as though turmeric is a bit like vitamin D in that it holds promise for a wide range of health issues.

Most people are unaware that turmeric comes in many different forms. A highly concentrated extract of turmeric provides the most benefit, but the powdered and raw root form of the spice is also beneficial. According to some research, piperine, the active ingredient in black pepper, increases absorption of turmeric’s active curcumin compounds. [4] So, it may be wise to consume your turmeric with a bit of black pepper to boost the health benefits.

Other Ways to Support Liver Health

There are two types of fatty liver: alcoholic fatty liver and nonalcoholic fatty liver. Prior to the 20th century, alcoholic fatty liver was the primary condition suffered by adults. But today, people of all ages suffer from fatty liver due to high rates of obesity and insulin resistance. Nonalcoholic fatty liver is commonly caused by the overconsumption of refined carbohydrates and is associated with metabolic syndrome. Fortunately, it is a reversible condition. Taking turmeric might be something to consider but the real change is going to come from consuming liver-cleansing foods on a regular basis, getting plenty of exercise, and eating a diet that is low in refined sugars and simple carbohydrates.

Have you experienced fatty liver? How do you cope?

References:

  1. Winkler A, Gessner DK, Koch C, et al. Effects of a plant product consisting of green tea and curcuma extract on milk production and the expression of hepatic genes involved in endoplasmic stress response and inflammation in dairy cows. Arch Anim Nutr. 2015 Dec;69(6):425-41. doi: 10.1080/1745039X.2015.1093873.
  2. Yiu WF, Kwan PL, Wong CY, et al. Attenuation of fatty liver and prevention of hypercholesterolemia by extract of Curcuma longa through regulating the expression of CYP7A1, LDL-receptor, HO-1, and HMG-CoA reductase. J Food Sci. 2011 Apr;76(3):H80-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1750-3841.2011.02042.
  3. Sumiyoshi M, Kimura Y. Effects of a turmeric extract (Curcuma longa) on chronic ultraviolet B irradiation-induced skin damage in melanin-possessing hairless mice. Phytomedicine. 2009 Dec;16(12):1137-43. doi: 10.1016/j.phymed.2009.06.003.
  4. Rinwa P, Kumar A. Piperine potentiates the protective effects of curcumin against chronic unpredictable stress-induced cognitive impairment and oxidative damage in mice. Brain Res. 2012 Dec 7;1488:38-50. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2012.10.002.

Dr. Edward F. Group III, DC, NP, DACBN, DCBCN, DABFM has studied natural healing methods for over 20 years and now teaches individuals and practitioners all around the world. He no longer sees patients but solely concentrates on spreading the word of health and wellness to the global community. Under his leadership, Global Healing Center, Inc. has earned recognition as one of the largest alternative, natural and organic health resources on the Internet.

The article Liver Health: The Role Of Turmeric In Fatty Liver Disease published by TheSleuthJournal – Real News Without Synthetics


Source: Alternative news journal

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