Can Wheat Drive More Than Your Digestive System Crazy?

Can Wheat Drive More Than Your Digestive System Crazy? | your-brain-on-gluten | General Health Sleuth Journal Special Interests

Wheat could be driving more than your digestive system crazy.

While wheat is well known to wreak havoc on the gastrointestinal health of genetically susceptible folks, such as those with celiac disease, and more recently, irritable bowel syndrome, new research published in the journal Psychiatry Research indicates that sensitivity to one of the components in wheat known as gliadin could be driving some into states of acute mania:

“The relationship of the antibodies to the clinical course of mania was analyzed by the use of regression models. Individuals with mania had significantly increased levels of IgG antibodies to gliadin, but not other markers of celiac disease, at baseline compared with controls in multivariate analyses.”

“Among the individuals with mania, elevated levels at follow-up were significantly associated with re-hospitalization in the six month follow-up period.”1

While correlation does not equal causation, it is interesting to note that there is already robust supportive research on the link between wheat consumption and schizophrenia. Seven such studies can be viewed on our open source wheat database, for those inclined to explore this connection further. You will also find listed there over a dozen neurological conditions linked to wheat consumption.

For an additional explanation for why wheat may exhibit neurotoxic, if not also psychotropic properties, the excerpts from our essay series The Dark Side of Wheat are provided to shed light on the topic:

Gliadin can be broken down into various amino acid lengths or peptides. Gliadorphin is a 7 amino acid long peptide: Tyr-Pro-Gln-Pro-Gln-Pro-Phe which forms when the gastrointestinal system is compromised. When digestive enzymes are insufficient to break gliadorphin down into 2-3 amino acid lengths and a compromised intestinal wall allows for the leakage of the entire 7 amino acid long fragment into the blood, glaidorphin can pass through to the brain through circumventricular organs and activate opioid receptors resulting in disrupted brain function.

There have been a number of gluten exorphins identified: gluten exorphin A4, A5, B4, B5 and C, and many of them have been hypothesized to play a role in autism, schizophrenia, ADHD and related neurological conditions.   In the same way that the celiac iceberg illustrated the illusion that intolerance to wheat is rare, it is possible, even probable, that wheat exerts pharmacological influences on everyone. What distinguishes the schizophrenic or autistic individual from the functional wheat consumer is the degree to which they are affected.

Below the tip of the “Gluten Iceberg,” we might find these opiate-like peptides to be responsible for bread’s general popularity as a “comfort food”, and our use of phrases like “I love bread,” or “this bread is to die for” to be indicative of wheat’s narcotic properties. I believe a strong argument can be made that the agricultural revolution that occurred approximately 10-12,000 years ago as we shifted from the Paleolithic into the Neolithic era was precipitated as much by environmental necessities and human ingenuity, as it was by the addictive qualities of psychoactive peptides in the grains themselves.

The world-historical reorganization of society, culture and consciousness accomplished through the symbiotic relationship with cereal grasses, may have had as much to do with our ability to master agriculture, as to be mastered by it.   The presence of pharmacologically active peptides would have further sweetened the deal, making it hard to distance ourselves from what became a global fascination with wheat.

An interesting example of wheat’s addictive potential pertains to the Roman army. The Roman Empire was once known as the “Wheat Empire,” with soldiers being paid in wheat rations. Rome’s entire war machine, and its vast expansion, was predicated on the availability of wheat. Forts were actually granaries, holding up to a year’s worth of grain in order to endure sieges from their enemies. Historians describe soldiers’ punishment included being deprived of wheat rations and being given barley instead.   The Roman Empire went on to facilitate the global dissemination of wheat cultivation which fostered a form of imperialism with biological as well as cultural roots.

The Roman appreciation for wheat, like our own, may have had less to do with its nutritional value as “health food” than its ability to generate a unique narcotic reaction. It may fulfill our hunger while generating a repetitive, ceaseless cycle of craving more of the same, and by doing so, enabling the surreptitious control of human behavior. Other researchers have come to similar conclusions. According to the biologists Greg Wadley & Angus Martin:

“Cereals have important qualities that differentiate them from most other drugs. They are a food source as well as a drug, and can be stored and transported easily. They are ingested in frequent small doses (not occasional large ones), and do not impede work performance in most people. A desire for the drug, even cravings or withdrawal, can be confused with hunger. These features make cereals the ideal facilitator of civilization (and may also have contributed to the long delay in recognizing their pharmacological properties).”

WHEAT PEPTIDES EXHIBIT MOLECULAR MIMICRY

Gliadorphin and gluten exporphins exhibit a form of molecular mimicry that affects the nervous system, but other wheat proteins effect different organ systems. The digestion of gliadin produces a peptide that is 33 amino acids long and is known as 33-mer which has a remarkable homology to the internal sequence of pertactin, the immunodominant sequence in the Bordetella pertussis bacteria (whooping cough). Pertactin is considered a highly immunogenic virulence factor, and is used in vaccines to amplify the adaptive immune response. It is possible the immune system may confuse this 33-mer with a pathogen resulting in either or both a cell-mediated and adaptive immune response against Self.

WHEAT CONTAINS HIGH LEVELS OF EXCITO-TOXINS

John B. Symes, D.V.M. is responsible for drawing attention to the potential excitotoxicity of wheat, dairy, and soy, due to their exceptionally high levels of the non-essential amino acids glutamic and aspartic acid. Excitotoxicity is a pathological process where glutamic and aspartic acid cause an over-activation of the nerve cell receptors (e.g. NMDA and AMPA receptor) leading to calcium induced nerve and brain injury.   Of all cereal grasses commonly consumed wheat contains the highest levels of glutamic acid and aspartic acid. Glutamic acid is largely responsible for wheat’s exceptional taste. The Japanese coined the word umami to describe the extraordinary “yummy” effect that glutamic acid exerts on the tongue and palate, and invented monosodium glutamate (MSG) to amplify this sensation. Though the Japanese first synthesized MSG from kelp, wheat can also be used due to its high glutamic acid content.   It is likely that wheat’s popularity, alongside its opiate-like activity, has everything to do with the natural flavor-enhancers already contained within it. These amino acids may contribute to neurodegenerative conditions such as multiple sclerosis, Alzhemier disease, Huntington’s disease, and other nervous disorders such as epilepsy, attention deficit disorder and migraines.

1 Markers of gluten sensitivity in acute mania: A longitudinal study.  Psychiatry Res. 2012 Mar 2. Epub 2012 Mar 2. PMID: 22386570

For Additional Research Visit Our Wheat & Gluten Education Center

A critically acclaimed internet classic, The Dark Side of Wheat is now available to own as a downloadable document exclusively from GreenMedInfo.com. It includes two hard-hitting essays that represent a change in the way wheat intolerance is comprehended; no longer a rare, strictly genetically-based disease, wheat is revealed to be a species-specific intolerance, whose role in health and disease has been greatly misunderstood since ancient times. The downloadable document also includes a 90-page quick reference guide containing hyperlinks to research on the National Library of Medicine on over 120 diseases that have been linked to wheat consumption.

The Dark Side of Wheat has changed many minds about the exalted status of wheat among secular and sacred institutions alike.

As Dr. Ron Hoggan, co-author of “Dangerous Grains” puts it in the foreword: “Sir Isaac Newton’s famous metaphor (perhaps quoting others) said something to the effect that we see further, not because of any special endowment of our own, but because we are standing on the shoulders of giants. After reading Sayer’s work on wheat, I felt as if I had just been boosted to a higher plane from which I could see and understand much, much more. Sayer’s insights continue to shape and inform much of my effort to understand the various impacts of grains on human health.”

© June 26, 2017 GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here http://www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter.


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Think The Anti-GMO Movement Is Unscientific? Think Again

Think The Anti-GMO Movement Is Unscientific? Think Again | monsanto-protest | GMOs Organic Market Classifieds Science & Technology

“Anyone that says, ‘Oh, we know that this is perfectly safe,’ I say is either unbelievably stupid, or deliberately lying. The reality is, we don’t know. The experiments simply haven’t been done, and now we have become the guinea pigs.”  ~ David Suzuki, geneticist

Now that the mainstream media is catching on to the public sentiment against GMO food, or at least against unlabeled GMO food, to the tune of millions of Americans who made it a point to drag themselves out of their homes to protest Monsanto (as well as at least 40 additional countries), inevitably the indictment will be made: “the anti-GMO movement is “unscientific.”” Is that really so?

What we do know is that the unintended consequences of the recombinant DNA process employed to create genetically engineering organisms are beyond the ability of present-day science to comprehend.  This is largely due to the post-Human Genome Project revelation that the holy grail of molecular biology, the overly-simplified ‘one gene > one trait’ model, is absolutely false.

Only recently, for instance, a previously unidentified viral gene fragment was discovered to be present in most of the GM crops commercialized to date; a finding which calls into question the safety of 54 commercialized crops already commercialized and being used in both food and feed. There could be hundreds of viral-gene altered proteins within these foods, whose complex interactions with DNA and toxicity have never been characterized.

Which statement therefore is more unscientific?

1)      GMO food safety cannot be proven

2)      GMO food harms cannot be proven

The scientific and logical answer would be that both GMO food safety and harms cannot be sufficiently proven; for reasons that include the fundamentally unethical nature of a human clinical trial that could result in poisoning the test subjects.

But, the weight of evidence actually indicates that statement #2 is the more unscientific one, as there is a growing body of scientific research produced by independent scientists indicating that GMO food harms can be clearly demonstrated, and through a simple process of extending feeding studies beyond the 90-day cut-off mark established by biotech corporations with a vested interest in hiding chronic adverse health effects. [see the latest long-term feeding study]

In other words, a failure of science to positively identify a problem does not mean that a problem does not exist. To err on the side of caution, is no less scientific than to err on the side of reckless abandon. When we fail to exercise the precautionary principle in our risk assessments, we are basically saying that GM foods are innocent until proven guilty. Juxtapose that to the burden of proof applied to nutritional or dietary supplements, which despite billions of doses taken in the US each year, have never been found to take anyone’s life. These are increasingly defined as guilty unless proven innocent through multi-million dollar clinical trials.

The problem, of  course, is that the burden of proving safety or toxicity falls on the exposed populations (Suzuki’s “guinea pigs), which only after many years of chronic exposure reveal the harms in their diseases, and then only vaguely in hard-to-prove post-marketing surveillance and epidemiological associations and linkages.

So, with this in mind, let’s bring up one dimension of the toxicity of GM foods and agriculture that cannot be thrown out as ‘unscientific,’ because it is clearly proven to be a health problem in the peer-reviewed and published literature: Roundup herbicide.

Think The Anti-GMO Movement Is Unscientific? Think Again | gmi_doc1_(1) | GMOs Organic Market Classifieds Science & Technology

free Roundup herbicide download

First, GreenMedInfo.com would like to announce that we are providing a free PDF download of all the research we have accumulated on the dangers of the glyphosate-based herbicide formulations, the most well-known being Monsanto’s patented glyphosate-based formulation known as Roundup. This document contains over 100 study abstracts from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) linking these herbicides to over 40 adverse health effects. Each study in the document is hyperlinked back to the original citation location on the NLM’s bibliographic citation database  MEDLINE. Download the document for free here: Glyphosate formulation research.

As the research in this document will clearly show (and the related open access research page on our website which also contains all the abstract) Roundup’s main ingredient glyphosate is now a ubiquitous poison, found in virtually all water, air and rainfall samples tested. It contaminates the groundwater, the source of most of our natural drinking water, and the soil to the point where it has suppressed and destroyed the microbial biodiversity in certain regions of the world, including probiotic organisms of major food importance. Moreover, it has been found to exhibit toxicity and carcinogenicity in cell studies at concentrations several orders of magnitude lower than found in agricultural applications (within the parts per trillion range).  When you calculate that several hundred millions of pounds are produced and used globally each year, this chemical is producing a health and environmental nightmare that is running completely out of control, with the future outlook looking even grimmer. With the discovery of  glyphosate-resistant weeds and insects, companies like Dow and Monsanto are planning on ‘stacking’ herbicide resistance GM traits, and producing plants that are resistant to a multitude of highly toxic agrichemicals, including the Agent Orange ingredient 2,4-D, guaranteeing the ratcheting up of a chemical arms race against the biosphere (and ourselves).

Another fundamental point that many miss with GM food safety is that not only is genetically engineered no longer food (food, by definition, are organisms that we have co-evolved with and consumed for hundreds of thousands, and sometimes millions of years), but in the case of the Bt gene-containing commercial crops are actually classified by the EPA as biopesticides.

But it gets worse. Roundup-ready foods have been engineered to survive the application of glyphosate-based herbicide poisoning. The toxic compounds in herbicides like Roundup, which include toxicity-amplifying surfactants like polyethoxylated tallow amine, end up in the tissue of the plants that we consume, or that our animals consume, bioaccumulating and amplifying their toxicity when we consume them as food.  One major metabolite of glyphosate called Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), which accumulates in the plant tissues of all Roundup Ready GM plants, is itself highly toxic, but which has not fallen under stringent regulatory oversight.  Essentially, if you eat GM food, it is not just the transgenes and the unintended toxic proteins they produce that are the problem. Rather, the ‘food’ is guaranteed to contain residues of highly toxic chemicals.

While it can be argued that it is ‘unscientific’ to claim the transgenes and their proteins in GMO food cause harm, it is foolish to argue that the continual exposure to known biocides like Roundup residues in our food is safe. Those who make this argument are the ones who lack the guidance of good science, or use the term ‘science’ as a political weapon against those who would seek out and express the truth.

Next time the invective “Unscientific!” comes up in a discussion about GMO food safety, arm yourself with the research that already exists proving GM food is harmful to animal, human and environmental health. And please help us share this article and the PDF far and wide.

Think The Anti-GMO Movement Is Unscientific? Think Again | not_a_science_experiment | GMOs Organic Market Classifieds Science & Technology

© June 23, 2017 GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here http://www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter.


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“Germs” Help The Body Produce Vitamin C: Breakthrough Discovery

"Germs" Help The Body Produce Vitamin C: Breakthrough Discovery | germs_help_body_produce_vitamin_C | General Health Medical & Health Science & Technology Sleuth Journal Special Interests

Groundbreaking new research indicates that humans are capable of synthesizing vitamin C via their highly complex and capable microbiome.

We live in a time and age where decades old assumptions about the human body are being overturned on a surprisingly regular basis. For instance, bodily cells were recently found to communicate inheritable information to sex cells (e.g. sperm) capable of being passed down to the next generation, effectively challenging the exclusivity of Darwinian forms of inheritance in favor of including the long denied Larmarckian view. Last year, edible plant material was found to ‘talk’ to the cells in our body via nanoparticles known as exosomes that regulate the expression of our DNA, as well as other important physiological pathways. This month, we reported on research showing that mammalian cells are capable of extracting energy directly through the sun with the help of the ‘plant blood’ molecule chlorophyll. Even more amazing may be Gerald Pollack’s notion that water’s hypothesized fourth phase acts like a battery within the body, providing a continuous source of sunlight-driven energy that requires no intermediary to convert directly to biochemical energy through the charge separation it affects in water.

These are only small sampling of new, scientifically confirmed discoveries that fly in the face of conventional scientific wisdom, opening up possibilities in nutrition and medicine that may contribute to radically safer and more effective therapeutic interventions in the near future.

‘Germs’ Makes Us Supra-Human?

Recently, I had a rather stimulating email exchange with my colleague Stephanie Seneff, PhD, who pointed out a study she had found wherein it was discovered that the human microbiome is capable of producing vitamin C. This is a remarkable possibility, as the human body is not believed capable of producing this essential vitamin, long since our hominid ancestors lost the genetic ability to do so about 60 million years ago.  The microbiome, however, is part of the new definition of the human body as a meta-organism, consisting of trillions of other microbial organisms and viruses without which we would never have survived. Also known as the hologenome theory of evolution, the idea is that the object of natural selection is not the individual organism, but the holobiont, i.e. the individual organism plus its associated microbial communities which include a mind numbingly complex web of bacteria, viruses, protozoa, helminths and fungi. In fact, if one looks at the genetic contribution of the human genome versus the total set of genes represented by the other organisms that make up the holobiont our genes only account for about 1%.

Not only is this a real ego challenge to anthropocentric and germophobic thinkers, but it reveals just how many capabilities we may borrow from these tiny co-inhabitants. For instance, recent research shows that our body draws from over 90 different bacterial strains in our gut to digest the gluten proteins in wheat that our own genome does not readily enable us to break down with any efficiency. Another cool example of how ‘germs’ help us to compensate for our genetic defects is the discovery that a certain Lactobacillus strain of food importance is capable of producing the active methylated form of folate — 5-methylenetetrahydrofolate — that those with MTHFR mutations are notoriously poor at producing in optimal quantities. We can assume, therefore, that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are not the final story on nutritional deficiencies or aberrations, but that our microbial friends may fill in gaps or voids epigenetically that our genes are not capable satisfying.

In this sense, the microbial portion of the holobiont significantly extends our genetic and/or epigenetic capabilities, making it possible to survive the ever-shifting ecological, environmental, nutritional niches that we have traversed in our seemingly infinitely long march (biological time stretching back millions of years) to our present-day incarnation. Whereas the primary nucleotide sequences in our DNA may require tens, hundreds and even millions of years to be significantly and/or functionally altered, microbial DNA contributions may shift in years, months, weeks, minutes and perhaps even in real-time in a matter of seconds. Can you see why Nature has compelled us into collaborating and even incorporating ‘germs’ into our body (note: the mitochondria in our body, according to the endosymbiotic view, were once proteobacteria outside of us!).

How We Produce Vitamin C

And so, it was within the context of this new understanding of the human body and it’s physiological capabilities that Seneff and I explored the possibility of vitamin C producing bacteria in our gut.

(click image to enlarge)

"Germs" Help The Body Produce Vitamin C: Breakthrough Discovery | screenshot | General Health Medical & Health Science & Technology Sleuth Journal Special Interests

The paper where this idea first emerged was published in Current Opinion on Biotechnology titled, “Bacteria as vitamin suppliers to their host: a gut microbiota perspective.” The remarkable paper focused on the role of food-related lactic acid bacteria (as found in cultured foods such as yogurt) as well as human gut commensal such as bifidobacteria and their ability to produce the vitamins we are not able to produce ourselves. The highlight, of course, was the discovery that bacterial isolates from human gut samples were capable of producing a wide range of vitamins, including vitamin C (ascorbate):

Notably, vitamin metabolism pathways were shown to be highly represented in all enterotypes, while two enterotypes were particularly  enriched in genes that specify the biosynthetic enzymes for biotin, riboflavin, pantothenate, ascorbate, thiamine and folate production. These phylogenetic and functional differences among enterotypes thus reflect different combinations of microbial trophic chains with a probable impact on synergistic interrelations with the human host.” [emphasis added]

Unfortunately, the paper did not discuss the methodological details as to how exactly they uncovered this fact. And so, in an effort to validate this study I did an extensive database search until I discovered a concrete example of a bacterial strain known to inhabit the human body that is capable of producing ascorbate: Corynebacterium glucuronolyticum (ATCC 51867), which contains an L-ascorbate biosynthesis pathway depicted below.

(click image to enlarge)

"Germs" Help The Body Produce Vitamin C: Breakthrough Discovery | Screen-Shot-2015-05-25-at-2_04_29-PM1 | General Health Medical & Health Science & Technology Sleuth Journal Special Interests

Interestingly, most Corynebacterium species are considered benign, but C. glucouronolyticum has been been linked to human urogential infections, and C. diphtheria is associated with opportunistic diphtheria infections. Emerson once said that a weed is an herb whose virtues have yet to be discovered. So too may be the case with ‘germs.’ A nuisance, perhaps, may grow into greater numbers when the body is suffering from a deficiency of one of its primarily biosynthetic pathways and associated biomolecule, be it a vitamin, anti-tumor agent, or antibiotic. It is possible that C. glucuronolyticum grows into ‘infectitious’ proportions when the body is starved in vitamin C, and that when the body is replete with vitamin C the normally benign strain does not contribute to urogenital infection.

Of course this discovery does not prove that the gut flora are capable of producing physiological relevant quantities of vitamin C via this strain alone. But it does prove that it is possible for the human body to produce vitamin C — further exemplifying how little we know about the human body, and again, how vitally important the ‘germs’ may be in helping us to compensate for our genetic impairments. I’ve always struggled with the idea that our ancestors were somehow able to survive 60 million years completely dependent on dietary sources of vitamin C, when an extreme deficiency (an inevitability given the famine-fast fluctuations of hunter-gatherer modes of subsistence) could result in severe debilitation or even death. That our body may contain a means to produce vitamin C — perhaps small but still life-saving amounts — makes intuitive sense, given the intelligence shot through the infinite complexity of Nature. And so, perhaps we are now only beginning to understand how much more energetic and biomolecular independence we have than conventional science has claimed we have.

© GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here http://www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter.


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MSG Proven Highly Toxic: 1 Dose Causes Headache In Healthy Subjects

MSG Proven Highly Toxic: 1 Dose Causes Headache In Healthy Subjects | msg_headache | General Health Toxins

Found everywhere as an additive in your food, research has uncovered that this “flavor enhancer” is extremely toxic, causing a battery of adverse health effects within normal dietary ranges.

A study published in the Journal of Headache Pain reveals that a single intake of monosodium glutamate (MSG) produces headache in the majority of healthy subjects tested.[i]

The researchers conducted a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover study to examine the effect of repeated MSG intake on the following:

  • Spontaneous pain
  • Mechanical sensitivity of masticatory muscles (the four muscles that move the jaw laterally)
  • Side effects
  • Blood pressure

The study method was described as follows:

“Fourteen healthy subjects participated in 5 daily sessions for one week of MSG intake (150 mg/kg) or placebo (24 mg/kg NaCl) (randomized, double-blinded). Spontaneous pain, pressure pain thresholds and tolerance levels for the masseter and temporalis muscles, side effects, and blood pressure were evaluated before and 15, 30, and 50 min after MSG intake. Whole saliva samples were taken before and 30 min after MSG intake to assess glutamate concentrations.”

The results were as follows:

  • Headache occurred in 8/14 subjects during MSG and 2/14 during placebo.
  • Salivary glutamate concentrations on Day 5 were elevated significantly (P < 0.05).
  • Pressure pain thresholds in masseter muscle were reduced (i.e. pain increased) by MSG on Day 2 and 5 (P < 0.05).
  • Blood pressure was significantly elevated after MSG (P < 0.040).
  • Tolerance did not develop over 5 days of MSG intake.

Also, a wide range of side effects were observed to occur in much greater frequency in the MSG group, including:

  • Sore Jaw
  • Nausea
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Stomach Ache
  • Dizziness
  • Chest Pressure

To view the study’s side effect tables, go here and here.

MSG Proven Highly Toxic: 1 Dose Causes Headache In Healthy Subjects | side_effects_msg | General Health Toxins

Discussion

This study has profound implications, insofar as the majority of packaged and prepared foods on the market today have either monosodium glutamate added, or a glutamate rich ‘food concentrate’ intended to model its flavor-enhancing effects, e.g. “hydrolyzed soy protein,” “yeast extract,” etc. It is therefore nearly impossible to avoid it, unless you are eating a whole food based diet, or one where you are preparing your foods from scratch. For those suffering from the battery of health complaints listed above, MSG avoidance should be a vital part of your strategy to improve your health through diet.

This study also has profound implications for the treatment of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD).  According to the study, TMD affects approximately 10% of the population, [ii] [iii] with the chief symptom leading the patient to seek medical attention being pain in the temporomandibular joint and/or masticatory muscles.  Interestingly, 70% of TMD sufferers report masticatory muscle pain and are described as suffering from myofascial TMD, [iv] despite the fact that there is little evidence of ongoing pathological change in masticatory muscles. It has been hypothesized that dietary triggers might aggravate craniofacial pain conditions, but until now little to no research has been conducted on their link with MSG. Because the doses used in the study (150 mg/kg) are within the daily total dietary ranges of glutamate consumption (50–200 mg/kg/day),[v] it is likely that the high prevalence of TMD without obvious pathological lesions within glutamate consuming populations may be due to MSG.

MSG Has A Broad Range of Adverse Health Effects

MSG is a neurotoxic and endocrine disruptive substance, linked to over a dozen health conditions. You can peruse the first-hand published research on our problem substances database: monosodium glutamate. In a previous article, “MSG: Drug, Poison or Flavor Enhancer,” we focused on the excitotoxic mechanism by which it ‘enhances flavor’ in a drug-like fashion, while at the same time damaging neurons, in addition to its ability to contribute to metabolic syndrome: a cluster of pathologies including insulin resistance, weight gain, altered blood lipid profiles, and hypertension. If it is so harmful, why does everyone use it? Because it makes food taste better, and causes a profound craving for more, in a vicious not that different from an illicit drug.


[i] Akiko Shimada, Brian E Cairns, Nynne Vad, Kathrine Ulriksen, Anne Marie Lynge Pedersen, Peter Svensson, Lene Baad-Hansen. Headache and mechanical sensitization of human pericranial muscles after repeated intake of monosodium glutamate (MSG). J Headache Pain. 2013 Dec ;14(1):2. Epub 2013 Jan 24. PMID: 23565943

[ii] ·  Cairns BE. Pathophysiology of TMD pain – basic mechanisms and their implications for pharmacotherapy. J Oral Rehabil. 2010;14:391–410. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2842.2010.02074.x. [PubMed] [Ref list]

[iii] LeResche L, Drangsholt M. In: Orofacial pain: from basic science to clinical management. Sessle BJ, Lavigne GJ, Lund JP, Dubner R, editor. Quintessence Books, Illinois; 2008. Epidemiology of orofacial pain: prevalence, incidence, and risk factors; pp. 13–18. [Ref list]

[iv] Lobbezoo F, Drangsholt MT, Peck C, Sato H, Kopp S, Svensson P. Topical review: new insights into the pathology and diagnosis of disorders of the temporomandibular joint. J Orofac Pain. 2004;14:181–191. [PubMed] [Ref list]

[v] Geha RS, Beiser A, Ren C, Patterson R, Greenberger PA, Grammer LC, Ditto AM, Harris KE, Shaughnessy MA, Yarnold PR, Corren J, Saxon A. Review of alleged reaction to monosodium glutamate and outcome of a multicenter double-blind placebo-controlled study. J Nutr. 2000;14(4S Suppl):58S–62S. [PubMed] [Ref list]


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Source: Alternative news journal

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Coconut Water: A New Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment?

Coconut Water: A New Alzheimer's Disease Treatment? | coconut | Natural Medicine Special Interests

Unlike conventional drug treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, coconut oil and water may help resolve some of the root causes of neurodegenerative conditions. 

Have you ever noticed that sometimes a food that nourish a particular organ often look uncannily similar to it? For instance, the walnut shell and bi-hemispheric flesh look awfully like the skull and brain it is now known to be exceptionally good for. Pomegranate fruit, the actual fruiting ovary of the plant, looks a lot like the mammalian ovary that it has been proven to support, containing relatively high levels of the actual bioidentical estrogen estrone. So too is the case with the head-like coconut, which is increasingly being looked at for preventing and/or improving brain dysfunctions such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) due to its wide range of potentially therapeutic properties, such as:

1)     Increasingly energy production in the brain by providing neurons an alternative to glucose, namely, the brain-nourishing metabolites of medium chain fatty acids known as ketone bodies.

2)     By contributing potent antioxidant polyphenols that may reduce oxidative stress, improve brain blood circulation and reducing neuroinflammation

3)     By inhibiting amyloid beta plaque-associated neuronal toxicity.

Indeed, a growing number of cell, animal, human and population-based studies reveal that coconut consumption may provide a natural solution to a growing global epidemic that pharmaceutical drugs have been shown to do nothing to mitigate. In fact, we have discussed in previous articles how modern drug-based treatment for AD actually is more like chemical warfare than a therapeutic intervention.

One reason why conventional interventions are so ineffective is that the brain is highly protected against the entry of chemicals due to the brain-blood-barrier (BBB), with most small molecule drugs and virtually all large molecule drugs incapable of gaining entry to the brain because of it. Even naturally occurring biomolecules such as fats have a hard time penetrating directly through the BBB. Coconut may be an exception to this rule, as it has copious amounts of the medium chain triglyceride known as caprylic acid, which preliminary research indicates is able to pass through the BBB and which has been demonstrated to possess  anti-convulsive and neuroprotective properties in the animal model.[1]

Coconut Water’s Anti-Alzheimer’s Properties

We have reported previously on coconut oil and Alzheimer’s research, but it appears another coconut product: coconut water, which contains no fatty acids of physiological relevance, may also have great value for those suffering with Alzheimer’s disease.

Coconut water is one of nature’s best forms of hydration due to its isotonic properties (it is able to pass through cell membranes easily). And while the focus on brain health has been primarily on brain structures, e.g. neurons, brain plaque, etc., little focus has been on the role of water in brain health, and particularly dehydration as a factor in chronic neurodegeneration illness. Coconut water may help to restore hydration to the brain, and considering the discovery of a 4th phase of water known as EZ by Gerald Pollack which acts like a battery by absorbing the energy of sunlight, this increased hydration of the brain may also translate to increased energy production in those tissues and associated improvements in cognition.

First, coconut water contains a range of essential biomolecules needed for health, including vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, amino acids, enzymes, growth factors and other nutrients which have yet to be fully characterized.

Second, one of the more promising classes of phytocompounds in coconut water (and related plants) is known as cytokinins. These plant hormones modulate plant cell division and are believed to have anti-aging properties. One cytokinin known as trans-zeatin has been investigated as a possible new treatment for neuronal diseases including Alzheimer’s disease. According to a recent review on coconut’s value in Alzheimer’s disease, trans-zeatin is capable of preventing the brain cell damaging properties of amyloid beta brain plaque and related impairments in memory:

“Zeatin has demonstrated antioxidant and cell protective effects against Ab-induced neurotoxicity in cultures of neuronal PC12 cells, and in experiments of mice treated with scopolamine to induce amnesia, pretreatment of the mice with zeatin caused a reduction in the level of induced amnesia, according to the passive avoidance test and Y maze test(165)[2]. Interestingly, another study has found that trans-zeatin could inhibit acetylcholinesterase (166,167)[3][4]. This indicates that cytokinin could have therapeutic value, as levels of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine are reduced in AD, and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are currently used to ameliorate the symptoms of AD.”

The enzyme acetylcholinersterase is the target of most AD drugs, because when this enzyme is inhibited it increases the duration of activity for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which in Alzheimer’s patients is believed to impaired or deficient.

Furthermore, the study pointed out another potentially beneficial property of coconut water for neurodegenerative disease via improving cardiovascular disease parameters (e.g. blood lipids and blood pressure):

“Coconut water has also been shown to have beneficial effects on serum and tissue lipid parameters, when given to rats concurrently fed a high-cholesterol containing diet(168).[5] Another study has investigated the positive effect of regular consumption of two tropical food drinks, coconut (C. nucifera) water and mauby (Colubrina arborescens), on the control of hypertension(169).[6] The combined products were found to be almost twice as effective as the products in isolation.”

If you have followed my previous writing on coconut water it is no secret to you that I am quite smitten with coconut water. In a previous article, “Coconut Water: More Than Just A Refreshing Beverage,” I broke down the multitude of health benefits it has been studied to possess. Despite these scientifically validated health properties, a common concern is coconut water’s sugar content. And yet, despite coconut water’s sweet taste and not insignificant simple sugar content it has actually been studied to have significant anti-diabetic properties.[7] [8] Also, take a look at this study showing that coconut water may outperform a blockbuster statin drug[9] for improving blood lipid profiles.  Because statin drugs are well known diabetogenic agents, coconut’s potential role in substituting for statin drugs may actually make it a powerful contributor to reducing iatrogenic, drug-caused diabetes.

Ultimately, I believe a compelling pattern of evidence points to the use of coconut oil and water as a therapeutic agent in the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. To learn more about how alternative fuel sources such as fatty acids may benefit brain health read “Sugar and Your Brain: Is Alzheimer’s Disease Actually Type 3 Diabetes?” To explore a rich database of research on natural interventions for Alzheimer’s disease view our section dedicated to the topic here: Alzheimer’s disease research.

References


[1] Wlaz´ P, Socała K, Nieoczym D, et al. (2012) Anticonvulsant profile of caprylic acid, a main constituent of the medium chain triglyceride (MCT) ketogenic diet, in mice. Neuropharmacology 62, 1882–1889.

[2] Choi SJ, Jeong CH, Choi SG, et al. (2009) Zeatin prevents amyloid b-induced neurotoxicity and scopolamine-induced cognitive deficits. J Med Food 12, 271–277.

[3]  Heo HJ, Hong SC, Cho HY, et al. (2002) Inhibitory effect of zeatin, isolated from Fatoua villosa, on acetylcholinesterase activity from PC12 cells. Mol Cells 13, 113–117.

[4] Mirjana BCˇ, Danijela ZK & Tamara DL (2013) Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors: pharmacology and toxicology. Curr Neuropharmacol 11, 315–335.

[5] Sandhya VG & Rajamohan T (2006) Beneficial effects of coconut water feeding on lipid metabolism in cholesterolfed rats. J Med Food 9, 400–407. 169.

[6]  Alleyne T, Roache S, Thomas C, et al. (2005) The control of hypertension by use of coconut water and mauby: two tropical food drinks. West Indian Med J 54, 3–8.

[7] Isabella F D Pinto, Railmara P Silva, Adriano de B Chaves Filho, Lucas S Dantas, Vanderson S Bispo, Isaac A Matos, Felipe A M Otsuka, Aline C Santos, Humberto Reis Matos. Study of Antiglycation, Hypoglycemic, and Nephroprotective Activities of the Green Dwarf Variety Coconut Water (Cocos nucifera L.) in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats. J Med Food. 2015 Feb 4. Epub 2015 Feb 4. PMID: 25651375

[8] P P Preetha, V Girija Devi, T Rajamohan. Hypoglycemic and antioxidant potential of coconut water in experimental diabetes. Food Funct. 2012 May 11. Epub 2012 May 11. PMID:22576019

 

© June 17, 2017 GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here http://www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter.

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Is BRCA (“Breast Cancer Gene”) A Death Sentence?

Is BRCA ("Breast Cancer Gene") A Death Sentence? | breast-cancer-gene | General Health Medical & Health Science & Technology Special Interests

What we think we know about the BRCA (Breast Cancer Susceptibility Associated) genes causing cancer is patently false, according to a new meta-analysis on the extant literature on the subject of these gene variations on breast cancer survival prognosis.  

A groundbreaking meta-analysis published in PLoS titled,”Worse Breast Cancer Prognosis of BRCA1/BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: What’s the Evidence? A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis“, calls into question the value of using BRCA1/2 gene status to determine breast cancer survival prognosis, as is common practice today. This implications of this research may have wide-ranging effects as the present climate, following Angelina Jolie’s high profile decision to have prophylactic breast, ovary and fallopian tube removed due to her perceived “genetic inheritance,” is to equate BRCA status with bona fide and mathematically calculable disease risk certainty.

Jolie’s decision to subject herself to multiple prophylactic organ removal was based on the premise that her BRCA mutations would result in an 87 percent lifetime risk of developing breast cancer and up to 54 percent chance of ovarian cancer, as prognosticated by her doctors. The notion that BRCA genes have full or near full penetrance (the ability of a mutation to cause clinically identifiable disease) has profound implications for the health of millions of women who rely on these predictions to make life and death medical decisions.

Because of a wide range of conflicting conclusions on the subject of BRCA’s role in determining cancer risk and prognosis, researchers in the new study attempted a systematic and quantitative synthesis of evidence using the following method:

“Eligible publications were observational studies assessing the survival of breast cancer patients carrying a BRCA1/2 mutation compared to non-carriers or the general breast cancer population. We performed meta-analyses and best-evidence syntheses for survival outcomes taking into account study quality assessed by selection bias, misclassification bias and confounding.”

They summarized their findings:

“Our review shows that, in contrast to currently held beliefs of many oncologists and despite 66 published studies, it is not yet possible to draw evidence-based conclusions about the association between BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriership and breast cancer prognosis. We only found sufficient evidence for a 10% worse unadjusted recurrence-free survival for BRCA1 mutation carriers. For all the other outcomes the evidence was judged to be indecisive.”

In their concluding remarks, the researchers state, “In contrast to currently held beliefs of some oncologists, current evidence does not support worse breast cancer survival of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers in the adjuvant setting; differences if any are likely to be small. More well-designed studies are awaited.”

In order to fully appreciate the implications of these findings one must understand the difference between using breast cancer diagnosis and breast cancer survival as a study end-point. Breast cancer is highly overdiagnosed and overtreated, with recent estimates indicating that about 1.3 million US women were wrongly diagnosed and treated for breast cancer in the past 30 years. And so, previous studies on BRCA1/2 gene variations and the incidence of breast cancer have not taken this massive statistical inflation of non-cancerous “breast cancer diagnoses” into account, further feeding the illusion that having an identified BRCA mutation equates to having a inexorably higher risk of a deadly cancer, when in fact, in cases where BRCA was linked to so-called early stage or ‘stage zero’ lesions such as Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS), this condition was recently determined to be intrinsically benign by a NCI-commissioned expert panel and therefore should not be lumped together with other truly deadly forms of breast cancer, as is still common practice today despite the growing body of evidence against it.

The same goes with BRCA-linked ovarian tumors, such as Borderline Ovarian Tumors (BOTs), which are also benign and highly overdiagnosed and overtreated. In fact, a JAMA study found that 5 times more women are diagnosed and treated with ovarian cancer than actually have it — indicating a massive problem that is not being taken into account by most literature on the role of BRCA mutations in cancer risk because these studies accept diagnosed cancer uncritically as actual cancer which is simply not the case due to the still largely unaccounted for issue of overdiagnosis. Furthermore, prophylactic removal of the ovaries before age 45 (Jolie is 39) has been linked to 67% increased mortality risk, according to a 2006 study published in Lancet Oncology, indicating that organ removal as a generic form of “cancer prevention” may be doing the opposite of ‘saving lives’ as widely claimed.

And so, what do we take away from this? First, BRCA gene status, based on this recent extensive meta-analysis on the topic, does not necessarily determine your health destiny when it comes to breast (or ovarian) cancer survival. The study found at best, sufficient evidence for a 10% worse unadjusted recurrence-free survival for BRCA1 mutation carriers, but nothing like the oft-quoted ‘personalized estimate’ of an 87% increase in mortality Jolie received from her doctors and which now many women think is far more common than is the case.

While BRCA gene ‘mutations’ (technically known a single nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs, a much less derogatory sounding descriptor) can result in dysfunctional or inactive BRCA protein production, which can prevent our body from healing DNA damage, they also ironically confer certain advantages as far as making the body susceptible to conventional chemotoxic treatments. Also, there is evidence that some of these ‘mutations’ confer survival advantage, as we addressed in our article, “Did Angelina Jolie Make A Mistake By Acting On The ‘Breast Cancer Gene’ Theory?“:

“BRCA1 variation K1 183R is related inversely to cancer risk, leading the authors of a review on the topic titled, “The case against BRCA1 and 2 testing,” to conclude: “It seems that some polymorphisms may actually have a protective effect.”

And therefore, what do we really understand about BRCA gene ‘mutations’ when there are over 500 that have been identified, and whose complexity and role in health and disease are still not yet understood? The truth is that the linear and deterministic gene > trait > disease risk/prognosis way of thinking is archaic, and reflects the type of hubris that should have been sloughed off after the first draft of the human genome project in 2005 found that the ‘holy grail’ of molecular biology was not to be found in the genome, but in the interstitial space of its interactions with the myriad factors ‘beyond the control of the gene,’ the realm of epigenetics, which involves everything from the food your mother ate, your in utero exposures, to your breast feeding duration, the toxins and toxicants you were and are exposed to, your way of thinking, attitudes and beliefs and the downstream physiological effects they have, ad infinitum.

Ironically, the notion that genes determine destiny is more than just an idea but a reality for those who believe it and act on the meme, putting ideology into practice in their biology and medical decisions. This is why acknowledging the research that calls into question biological determinism and medical fatalism is so powerful and why we hope our readers continue to explore the primary literature itself as it expands and transforms the often out-dated knowledge base that conventional practice is still under the illusion is reflective of the truth.

© GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here http://www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter.

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Coconut Oil May Reduce White Rice Calories 50-60%

Coconut Oil May Reduce White Rice Calories 50-60% | rice | General Health

White rice is far from a health food, the excessive consumption of which contributes to overweight, obesity and blood sugar disorders, but new research indicates adding coconut oil while cooking it can dramatically alter its nutritional structure and function.

The way that a food will affect your blood sugar depends on a wide range of factors.

For instance, you can’t just take a particular food’s glycemic rating in isolation, such as white rice, because it is invariably consumed with other ingredients and dishes.  And some of them, containing fat or spices, may significantly reduce the effect a particular ingredient within a meal will have on your blood sugar.

White rice, of course, is emblematic of a highly processed grain, as it’s germ and bran have been removed, which constitute the bulk of its vitamins, minerals, essential fats and fiber. What you have remaining is essentially starch, which being comprised of a large number of glucose units, is a form of “hidden sugar.”  It rates about 65 on the glycemic index, which compared to brown rice, is about 10 points higher. White sugar (sucrose), for perspective, is rated 68, and an apple 38.

Within certain schools of nutritional thought, it has long been held that if you mix certain fats with carbohydrate-rich, high glycemic starchy foods you will be able to reduce the blood sugar raising effect they have, yet little scientific research has been conducted to prove this.

Now, two scientists from the College of Chemical Sciences, Industrial Technology Institute, Sri Lanka, have found an innovative way to shed light on this theory, making news headlines with their remarkable results. An undergraduate, Sudhair James, presented his preliminary research at National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society last month:

“What we did is cook the rice as you normally do, but when the water is boiling, before adding the raw rice, we added coconut oil—about 3 percent of the weight of the rice you’re going to cook. After it was ready, we let it cool in the refrigerator.”

James’ supervisor, Dr. Pushparajah Thavarajah, pointed out in interview that this formulation renders the starch more resistant to digestion: “If you can reduce the digestible starch in something like steamed rice, you can reduce the calories. The impact could be huge.”

The researchers tested eight difference recipes on 38 different types of rice available in Sri Lanka, and when their new cooking method was applied to the least healthful of varieties they produced a 10-12 percent reduction in calories. But they claim this is just the beginning and that a 50-60 percent reduction is possible using their method with more suitable varieties of rice which will be tested in the future.

A Washingtonpost.com report elaborates further on their findings:

“James and Thavarajva tested eight different recipes on 38 different kinds of rice found in Sri Lanka. What they found is that by adding a lipid (coconut oil in this case, because it’s widely used in Sri Lanka) ahead of cooking the rice, and then cooling the rice immediately after it was done, they were able to drastically change its composition—and for the better.

“The oil interacts with the starch in rice and changes its architecture,” said James. “Chilling the rice then helps foster the conversion of starches. The result is a healthier serving, even when you heat it back up.”

So far they have only measured the chemical outcome of the most effective cooking method for the least healthful of the 38 varieties. But that variety still produced a 10 to 12 percent reduction in calories. “With the better kind, we expect to reduce the calories by as much as 50 to 60 percent,” said James.”

One of the ‘tricks’ of this new process that the finished product must be refrigerated for 12 hours and served. The coconut oil, it was reported, “changed the structure of the rice molecularly in such a way that its starch turns healthier.” It was also observed that even when the chilled rice was re-heated, it still maintained its novel properties. James explained the chemistry behind this alteration: “Cooling for 12 hours will lead to formation of hydrogen bonds between the amylose molecules outside the rice grains which also turns it into a resistant starch.”

It should be noted that there are already a form of rice, known as parboiled or “converted rice,” which is both lower in calories and much lower on the glycemic index at 38. In the production of parboiled rice the vitamins and minerals from the husk are forced through steaming and being dried into the starchy and gelatinous granule. This retains approximately 80% as much of the nutrients as brown rice and also creates “prebiotic” fuel (type 3-resistant starch) for beneficial bacteria in the gut.[i]

With biotech corporations scrambling to alter the genetic code of food crops to accomplish similar results which can be patented, monetized and controlled, this new research is a refreshing reminder that culinary innovations (some of them no doubt drawing from ancient tradition) may solve problems and enhance nutritional profiles in simple, do-it-yourself ways.

You can read the American Chemical Society’s offical press release on their work here: New low-calorie rice could help cut rising obesity rates


[i] Elizabete Helbig, Alvaro Renato Guerra Días, Rafael Aldrighi Tavares, Manoel Artigas Schirmer, Moacir Cardoso Elias. [The effect of parboiled rice on glycemia in Wistar rats]. Arch Latinoam Nutr. 2008 Jun ;58(2):149-55. PMID: 18833992


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A Failing Chemotherapy Paradigm Looks To Flaxseed For Help

A Failing Chemotherapy Paradigm Looks To Flaxseed For Help | flaxseed_cancer_greenmedinfo | Natural Medicine Sleuth Journal Special Interests

When conventional cancer medicine fails to produce positive outcomes, a humble little seed comes to the rescue. 

A new study published in the International Journal of Oncology illustrates an important shift occurring in medical research today, namely, a growing recognition that conventional treatments like chemotherapy, taken alone, are failing to produce positive results and that the use of natural substances may be an indispensable way to improve outcomes.

In the study titled, Combining doxorubicin with a phenolic extract from flaxseed oil: Evaluation of the effect on two breast cancer cell lines, Italian researchers sought to evaluate the possible synergistic role of an extract of flaxseed in combination with the conventional chemo-drug doxorubicin in a number of breast cancer cell lines.

They also noted that a commonly used cancer drug known as doxorubicin is notorious for its many side effects. You can review the primary literature on dozens of doxorubicin’s known side effects on our database. The researchers hypothesized that one way around this problem would be to reduce the amount of doxorubicin used by combining it with a safer, more natural compound.

In a previous study, the researchers showed a phenolic extract of flaxseed oil resulted in a number of chemotherapeutic effects (increase in apoptosis, G0/G1 phase cell cycle, and the activation of signaling and pro‑oxidant pathways). The new study looked at the combined effect of doxorubicin and a phenolic extract of flaxseed oil on two different breast cancer cell lines, focusing on what conditions are ideal for using lower doses doxorubicin. They reported the experiment a success:

“We report the data relating to the ability of this mixture to induce cytotoxicity and apoptosis, cell cycle modification, mitochondrial membrane depolarization and activation of extrinsic and/or intrinsic apoptotic pathway.”

While this only a preliminary investigation, and does not have the gravitas of a human clinical trial, flaxseed has been subject to extensive research on its chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic properties. We’re reported on this in depth in previous articles, such as:

We have also done a lot of advocacy around the topic of conventional treatment failure, including the problems of cancer overdiagnosis, overtreatment, and the failure of modern oncology to address the root causes of cancer and the role that cancer stem cells play in the process of carcinogenesis and treatment failure.

There is a profound shift occurring in the medical research community today. With the growing awareness that food is not just a source of energy and material building blocks for the body, but capable of being a form of medicinal or nutrigenomic information, it is no longer considered far fetched to look at something as commonplace, and benign as flaxseed as having disease-resolving power.

For more information on natural substances that may be of value in the prevention and treatment of cancer. Use our Cancer database on the topic to search thousands of studies.

© June 10, 2017 GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here http://www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter.


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3 Natural H. Pylori ‘Cures’ That Are Clinically Proven

3 Natural H. Pylori 'Cures' That Are Clinically Proven | helicbacter_pylori_cures_natural_proven | Natural Medicine

H. pylori infection is often treated with three drugs simultaneously, but not everyone responds favorably. Thankfully there are clinically confirmed natural, food-based alternatives. 

Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a bacteria estimated to be found in the body of two-thirds of the world’s population naturally, and usually does not cause symptoms. But in some cases it can be found as a contributing factor in ulcers, and may even drive some forms of gastric cancer.  Modern treatment for H. pylori infection focuses on total eradication using so-called “triple therapy,” which includes two antibiotics and an acid-blocker. Treatment of this kind, however, often results in antibiotic-associated imbalances in the gut flora, as well as driving antibiotic-resistant strains of H. pylori which can cause more serious forms of recurrence. This is one reason why there is growing interest in natural alternatives to drug-based treatment, and why we are excited to highlight some of the more compelling research out there on ‘natural cures’ to this common problem.

Here are three clinically tested solutions that may work in tandem, or as a complete alternative to conventional treatment:

  1. Broccoli Sprouts: A study published in Digestive Diseases and Sciences in 2004 titled, “Oral broccoli sprouts for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection: a preliminary report“, found that seven of nine patients (78%) who consumed broccoli sprouts (14, 28, or 56 g) twice daily for 7 days were stool antigen negative for H. pylori infection immediately after the completion of therapy and six remained negative at day 35. Broccoli sprouts contain extremely high levels of the sulfur-containing biomolecule sulforaphane which we have identified research on mitigating over 150 different diseases.

  2. Probiotics: A 2012 study published in Inflammation and Allergy Drug Targets titled, “Probiotic multistrain treatment may eradicate Helicobacter pylori from the stomach of dyspeptics: a placebo-controlled pilot study“, found that a 10-day treatment with a multi-strain probiotic in patients with H. pylori associated dyspepsia resulted in 13 of the 40 patients experiencing complete eradication. (Note: The patients received 1.8 trillion alive of the following strains: Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium longum, Lactobacillus plantarum, Bifidobacteriuym brevis, Lactobacillus paracasei, Bifidobacterium infantis, Lactobaccilus delbrueckii bulgaricus subspecies). Probiotics fight infection naturally. For additional information consult our research page on probiotics which includes research on its value in over 200 conditions, many of which are infection-related.

  3. Black Seed (Nigella Sativa): A 2010 study published in the Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology titled, “Comparative study of Nigella Sativa and triple therapy in eradication of Helicobacter Pylori in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia“, found that a dose of only 2 grams of black seed (Nigella Sativa) in combination with an acid blocker was about as effective (67%) as triple therapy (which includes an acid blocker, and two antibiotics) in treating H. pylori infection. Black seed has been studied to have value in a wide range of conditions. Consult our black seed database page for more information.

In addition to these solutions, please consult our growing Helicobacter pylori research page which includes over 50 studied natural, evidence-based interventions, including possible problem substances such as aspirin which may cause underlying damage to the mucosal lining of the digestive tract, producing conditions that lead to the opportunistic overgrowth of “bad” bacteria such as H. pylori.

Also, you can learn more by reading a really wonderful 2014 review published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology titled, “Exploring alternative treatments for Helicobacter pylori infection“, looked at over 300 studies published between 1991 and 2013 which covered plant-based anti-H. pylori activity from around the world, highlighting garlic, licorice, broccoli, green tea, probiotics and the bee products honey and propolis.

Lastly, for additional information on the increasing rise of antibiotic resistant bacteria, and alternatives to conventional treatment suggested by the growing evidence base, consult the following articles:

 

©  June 8, 2017 GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here http://www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter.


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Why Laptops Should Be Renamed To Protect Consumers

Why Laptops Should Be Renamed To Protect Consumers | laptop | General Health Science & Technology

Recent research published in the journal Archives of Environmental and Occupational Health concluded that the “Laptop is paradoxically an improper site for the use of a LTC [laptop computer], which consequently should be renamed to not induce customers towards an improper use.” [emphasis added]

What lead these reseachers to reach such a seemingly drastic conclusion?

In the study referenced above and titled “Exposure to electromagnetic fields from laptop use of “laptop” computers,” researchers found that electromagnetic fields (EMFs) produced by laptop computers likely induce currents within the adult body, and the bodies of developing fetuses exposed by proxy, to unsafe levels.  They found that in the laptop computers analyzed EMF values were “considerably higher than the values recommended by 2 recent guidelines for computer monitors magnetic field emissions…”

Furthermore:

When close to the body, the laptop induces currents that are within 34.2% to 49.8% ICNIRP recommendations, but not negligible, to the adult’s body and to the fetus (in pregnant women). On the contrary, the power supply induces strong intracorporal electric current densities in the fetus and in the adult subject, which are respectively 182-263% and 71-483% higher than ICNIRP 98 basic restriction recommended to prevent adverse health effects.
— Archives of Environmental and Occupational Health, 2012 Jan; 67(1): 31-6

The fact that laptop computers may have adverse health effects was confirmed late last year (Nov. 2011) in the journal Fertility and Sterility, which we reported on in this article.  In summary, researchers discovered that laptops connected to the internet through Wi-Fi decrease human sperm motility and increase sperm DNA fragmentation. This was the first human clinical study of its kind to establish that laptop-associated radiation can cause substantial harm to male fertility.

Laptop computers are far more convenient than desktops and difficult to avoid, especially if your livelihood is in any way connected to computer work and the internet. An effort should be made to use them cautiously and to avoid putting them directly on your lap. When circumstances make such exposures unavoidable it is possible that natural substances like turmeric, and propolis, along with other radioprotective substances, can reduce the adverse effects associated with exposure to harmful electromagnetic fields.

© June 5, 2017 GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here http://www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter.

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